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New Leaf

A Whole Health Community

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What is New Leaf?

To thrive in our personal and professional lives, we need to properly care for our health and wellness throughout the day. To this end, the New Leaf website has been developed to promote a whole health community, connecting employees with the best activities, tools, and resources to maintain a healthy well-being that encompasses our physical, emotional, and mental health. New Leaf is the idea that when you care for yourself, you give yourself the nutrients to grow a new leaf on your personal "tree". For example- managing your stress can give you the patience and concentration to grow in other areas of your life. Eating a balanced and nutritious diet will help you to stay healthy and have a stronger and healthier immune system. This whole health community also ties us to nature and will connect with the workshops on becoming more eco-friendly and help us to live a less toxic lifestyle.

This new virtual whole health community will include information on nutrition, alternative ways of caring for your health, connecting with nature, physical fitness and much more. We are working on creating a community that you can engage with; not just in person during your lunch break or at work, but providing tools that can help improve your health and well-being from anywhere.

A new recipe will be featured weekly. A new Physical, Emotional and Nutritional tip will be featured the first week of every month. 

Roasted Chicken with Potatoes, Arugula, and Garlic Yogurt

April 16 - 20, 2018

roasted chicken with potatoes etc

Ingredients:
  • 1 ½ to 2 pounds boneless skinless chicken thighs (8-10 thighs)
  • 1 ¼ pounds small Yukon Gold potatoes, halved and cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 2 ½ teaspoons kosher salt, more as needed
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper, more as needed
  • 2 tablespoons harissa (or use another thick hot sauce, such as sriracha)
  • ½ teaspoon ground cumin
  • 4 ½ tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, more as needed
  • 2 leeks, white and light green parts only, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced
  • ½ teaspoon lemon zest (from 1/2 lemon)
  • ⅓ cup plain yogurt (I used Greek yogurt)
  • 1 small garlic clove
  • 2 ounces baby arugula, or more, as desired
  • Chopped fresh dill, as needed
  • Lemon juice, as needed

Instructions:
  1. Combine chicken and potatoes in a large bowl. Season with salt and pepper.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together harissa, cumin and 3 tablespoons oil. Pour over chicken and potatoes and toss to combine. Let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes, or up to 8 hours in the refrigerator.
  3. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, combine leeks, lemon zest, a pinch of salt and the remaining 1 1/2 tablespoons oil.
  4. Heat oven to 425 degrees (I used the convection roast setting). Arrange chicken and potatoes on a large rimmed baking sheet in a single layer making sure not to overcrowd the pan. Roast 15 minutes.
  5. Remove pan from the oven and toss potatoes lightly. Scatter leeks over pan. Roast until chicken and potatoes are cooked through and everything is golden and slightly crisped, 20 to 30 minutes longer.
  6. While chicken cooks, place yogurt in a small bowl. Grate garlic over yogurt and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  7. To serve, scatter dill over the chicken and vegetables in the pan. Place a generous handful of arugula on each plate. Spoon chicken and vegetables over the arugula. Dollop yogurt sauce over the chicken. Drizzle with oil and lemon juice and serve. (I served each plate with lemon to squeeze over the top, as desired.)

Natural Remedies for Seasonal Allergies

April 2018

allergies

Seasonal allergies are annoying, and so are the drugs you pop to relieve sneezing, sniffling, and itchy, red eyes. (They tire you out! They’re expensive!) While you can't reduce the pollen in the air, you might be able to limit the number of drugs you take in response. "The biggest trend we see in allergies isn't technology and it isn't medicine—it's the tendency to go for a more natural treatment," says Brunilda Nazario, MD, medical editor at WebMD. Here are some natural remedies for allergies to keep your symptoms at bay.

Rinse with saline before symptoms strike.

Head off allergies by starting to treat them before you feel anything, advises Nathanael Horne, MD, of New York Medical College. This is especially important these days, as allergy season seems to start earlier every year. One step is to spritz a saline rinse into your nose daily to wash away pollen. This method won't necessarily take the place of medication, but it could reduce your need for drugs. In one study, participants who rinsed their sinuses twice a day for three to six weeks reported less nasal congestion than those who didn't. Allergists with allergies swear by saline rinses and these other tricks to nip their symptoms in the bud.

Choose chicken over beef.

A two-year study of 334 adults with hay fever and 1,336 without found those who had the most trans oleic acid in their diets, a form of monounsaturated fat found primarily in meat and dairy products, were nearly three times as likely to have hay fever as those who ate the least. Olive oil is okay; although it’s got a lot of oleic acid, it’s not the “trans” form. Here's why nutritionists want you to stop cooking with coconut oil.

Pop a fish oil supplement.

A study of people with allergic asthma (asthma caused by allergies) found those who took daily fish-oil supplements for a month had lower levels of leukotrienes, chemicals that contribute to the allergic reaction. Steer clear of these 8 useless vitamins that are a total waste of money.

Never leave without a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses.

It may look like you're an incognito Hollywood star, but both of these will keep pollen from blowing into your eyes and making them an itchy, watery mess. Check out these 11 weird things that make your allergies worse.

Try butterbur.

Pharmaceuticals pack more punch, but if you want to use natural remedies for allergies, butterbur has the best track record among herbs used for pollen allergies (it's also a known headache remedy), David Rakel, MD, founder and director of the University of Wisconsin Integrative Medicine Program, told WebMD. Some studies suggest it can be as effective for nasal symptoms as an antihistamine, with no accompanying sleepiness. (Keep in mind that the safety of long-term use hasn't been studied.) You need to stop believing these 11 allergy myths right now.

Try acupuncture.

Acupuncture may help relieve hay fever, according to new research published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. In the study, allergy sufferers who were randomly assigned to a dozen acupuncture sessions had more symptom relief and used less antihistamine medication than those who got a “sham treatment” or did not get the treatment. Experts don’t know for sure why acupuncture acts as one of the many natural remedies for allergies, but suspect that it “curbs inflammatory immune-system substances involved in allergic reactions,” according to HealthDay. Acupuncture may also help treat pain, digestive issues, boost fertility, and other health conditions.

Cook with turmeric.

Turmeric, a spice common in curry and Indian cuisine, contains curcumin. It may act as a decongestant, help reduce allergy symptoms, and ward off colds. "It seems to be as effective as some drugs for certain conditions," said Bharat Aggarwal, PhD, professor of experimental therapeutics at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Try adding these 9 other healing herbs and spices to your recipes for good health.

Move your outdoor workout to dusk.

Save outdoor exercise for the evening, advises H. James Wedner, MD, of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Not only do many people with allergies experience more sneezing and itching in the morning, but many trees release their pollen at first light, and ragweed pollen tends to fly most thickly at midday—so stick to end-of-day strolls. (Allergists reveal the worst advice they've ever heard about allergies.)

Change your clothes when you come home.

You already know to leave windows shut and to avoid spending time outdoors on windy, sunny, pollen-infested days, but don’t forget that you drag pollen into your home on your clothes and shoes even if you can’t see it. Toss soiled clothes in the hamper immediately; even better, jump in the shower.

Make sure your appliances have HEPA filters.

If you don't have a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter in your vacuum cleaner, you may be making your symptoms worse by stirring up pollen that has settled on your floor and furniture, says Selina Gierer, DO, an allergy expert at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City. Using HEPA filters in your air conditioner or heating system can also help ease allergy symptoms. Some experts suggest placing a freestanding air purifier with a HEPA filter in a high-traffic area. Here's how to allergy-proof every room in your home.

Change your car’s cabin air filter.

It’s a good idea to do this yearly, says Wedner. Older filters can blast pollen into your face. Check out these surprising allergy triggers that may be giving you a bad case of the sniffles.

Take meds at night, not in the morning.

Hay fever symptoms, such as runny nose, scratchy throat, and sneezing typically, are at their worst in the morning. What helps for most people: taking medication at bedtime, says Richard Martin, MD, at National Jewish Health in Denver. Don't forget to ask these 10 super-important questionsnext time your prescribed a new medication!

Know when to break out the drugs.

Still a sodden, itchy mess? It's time to try conventional medicine, Nazario suggests. If you have symptoms only occasionally, you'll most likely need an over-the-counter antihistamine, a nasal decongestant spray, or both; if you suffer throughout the season, you may need to substitute or add a prescription steroid spray. These are 10 over-the-counter medications you're probably using wrong.

 

Source: https://www.rd.com/health/conditions/12-natural-allergy-remedies-that-provide-relief/ 

The Hidden Health Effects Of Sexual Harassment

April 2018 - Sexual Harassment Awareness Month

me too workplace

Victims of sexual harassment often experience emotional and physical symptoms for years to come.

Sexual harassment in the workplace is nothing new, but the issue is seeing a tidal wave of recognition and attention as celebrities, co-workers and others step up to accuse Hollywood heavy weights like Harvey WeinsteinKevin Spacey and Louis C.K. of sexual misconduct. Through their stories, we've learned that sexual harassment can wreak havoc on its victims, and can cause not only mental health issues, but physical effects as well.

Dr. Colleen Cullen, a licensed clinical psychologist, notes that for victims of sexual harassment, the most common diagnoses are depression, anxiety, and even post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

"An experience [with sexual harassment] can either trigger symptoms of depression and anxiety that are new to the person; or it can exacerbate a previous condition that may have been controlled or resolved. Patients may also see a worsening of symptoms," says Dr. Cullen. "Some research has found that sexual harassment early in one's career in particular can [cause] long-term depressive symptoms."

Someone going through or dealing with the aftermath of sexual harassment may also exhibit symptoms of PTSD, especially if the harassment leads to violence and/or assault.

“Among women who experience a sexual assault, 90 percent who experience sexual violence in the immediate aftermath exhibit symptoms of acute stress,” says Dr. Helen Wilson, a licensed clinical psychologist with expertise on the effects of trauma. “For many people, these symptoms dissipate over time through social support and coping strategies, and many people totally recover and move on; others will be so distressed that it really interferes with their work and life. It takes a certain number of symptoms to diagnose, but that’s when it can become PTSD.”

IT’S NOT ALL IN YOUR HEAD; THE BODY REACTS, TOO

Now, there are some who may counter, “Well, I can see how sexual assault can lead to such disturbances, but how can harassment be so harmful? Sounds a bit dramatic!” This thinking is deeply problematic not only because it dismisses medical science and undermines the stories of survivors, but also because it feeds the crippling doubt that so many victims face. These doubts can foster denial, which can lead to its own set of complications, particularly around physical health.

“Sometimes sexual harassment registers as a trauma, and it's difficult for the [patient] to deal with it, so what literally happens is the body starts to become overwhelmed,” says Dr. Nekeshia Hammond, a licensed psychologist. “We call it somatizing: the mental health becomes so overwhelming one can’t process it to the point of saying ‘I have been traumatized’ or ‘I am depressed.’ Essentially, it’s a kind of denial that when experienced for a long state can turn into physical symptoms.”

These physical symptoms can run the gamut, manifesting as muscle aches, headaches, or even chronic physical health problems such as high blood pressure and problems with blood sugar.

“In the long term, it could lead to heart issues,” says Hammond.

One needn’t be in shock or denial to experience these physical effects. Hammond adds that even patients who have confronted issues with full awareness and recognize that they are anxious or depressed can experience these problems. This is because the brain and body are inextricably linked, as Dr. Wilson explains.

Physical symptoms can run the gamut, manifesting as muscle aches, headaches, or even chronic physical health problems such as high blood pressure and problems with blood sugar.

Physical symptoms can run the gamut, manifesting as muscle aches, headaches, or even chronic physical health problems such as high blood pressure and problems with blood sugar.

"The part of our brain that processes emotions, including stress, are among the earliest to develop, and is right next to the brain stem, which deals with involuntary functions such as heart rate and breathing,” says Wilson. “When we're stressed resources go there, which can impact cardiovascular functioning, autoimmune diseases, metabolic function, [and so on],” says Wilson. “Sometimes people think stress is in our head, but our brains are an organ like any other. It's all very connected. Neurotransmitters found in our brains are also found in our gut. It's a real thing: this is why we tend to get sick when we get stressed, and over time, if we’re in constant stress or if it’s too much to handle, then there are physiological consequences.”

SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN THE WORKPLACE: 'A SLITHERING SNAKE'

While sexual harassment under any circumstances can wreak havoc on a victim's health, workplace harassment is a special kind of ugly. Nannina Angioni, a labor and law employment attorney who has worked on hundreds of sexual harassment cases describes it as "slithering snake that ripples its way through a work environment causing disastrous results."

"Employees talk of having a pit in their stomach commuting to work, having anxiety, panic attacks, inexplicable fits of crying and physical manifestations of stress: hair falling out, hives, weight gain or loss, sleeplessness and lethargy," says Angioni.

Dr. Cullen adds that the feelings of shame or guilt that a person may feel when sexually harassed at work can devastate their self-esteem and sense of self-worth as a professional.

“They may feel that they did something to make this happen or egg it on in some way,” says Cullen. “Embarrassment can be experienced, a fear over other people finding out. Also, particularly early in their career, a person may doubt their ability, and wonder if they weren’t only hired because of their sexual value. They may question their achievements, and if they’re young or new to a field, they may ask, ‘Is this just what it’s like in this field?’ If they have nothing to compare it to, they may not have an idea of what is normal or what the appropriate recourse is.”

Here’s where the research Cullen mentioned earlier, which shows that sexual harassment early in one’s career can have long-term mental health effects comes into play. Wendy L. Patrick, a prosecutor and educator, has personally seen depression “last up to a decade” for women who experienced sexual abuse in the workplace, and notes that it can affect their performance in subsequent jobs.

Surely the (often silent) suffering of the victim mustn’t be underestimated, but it’s important to note that when one employee is being abused, their colleagues may also be afflicted. After all, it’s stressful to keep a secret, especially one that is so clearly damaging.

“When employees are questioned about the effect of harassment [on a colleague], you always hear about some physical manifestation of stress. They can’t sleep. They have to keep getting up to go to the bathroom,” says Angioni. “It’s really hard: You’re watching someone on your team suffer, or even wither away as they just try to get through the days.”

WHEN TO HELP A HURTING COLLEAGUE — AND HOW TO GET TREATMENT

A victim of sexual harassment may ultimately want to speak out against their abuser, but it’s important for others to speak up, too, even ahead of the victim. If you know something, say something; but don’t gossip —that only escalates the problem and further endangers the victim.

“When people suspect something is going on and don’t speak out, the harassment evolves,” says Angioni. “I counsel companies and employees to go about it tactfully. If you think something is happening, don't talk about it at the water cooler, or in front of the victim. Don’t send snarky emails or texts. Talk to someone in management. Help without creating a further problem. If there is not an HR person, find a trusted supervisor. If you really can’t find someone you trust, you contact the Department of Fair Employment and Housing.”

If you know something, say something; but don’t gossip — that only escalates the problem and further endangers the victim.

If you know something, say something; but don’t gossip — that only escalates the problem and further endangers the victim.

For the victim, speaking out may be challenging, and in some cases they may just really not be willing or able to do so. It’s important that both victims and their supporters understand that while silence isn’t ideal, it may be what works for the coping or healing process at the moment. But only if you’re talking to a mental health professional about what is going on. This cannot be emphasized enough: If you are being sexually harassed you mustn’t keep this a secret; it is literally toxic to your health.

“Some victims will never report abuse and they have that right,” says Dr. Hammond. “It’s a case by case thing and sometimes there’s a reason for staying silent — if you feel your safety is threatened, or if you’re literally on the verge of having an emotional breakdown and will be unable to function. But you need to reach out to someone.”

If you’re worried about the cost of visiting a professional, or if you’re wary to begin therapy, Dr. Hammond recommends calling the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-656-HOPE (4673). Services are free and include confidential support from a trained staff member, help finding a local resources if needed, counseling, referrals, information on your local laws regarding harassment and information about medical concerns.

 Source: https://www.nbcnews.com/better 

Health Benefits of Raw Honey

April 2018

raw honey

According to Dr. Ron Fessenden, M.D., M.P.H. the average American consumes more than 150 pounds of refined sugar, plus an additional 62 pounds of high fructose corn syrup every year. (1In comparison, we consume only around 1.3 pounds of honey per year on average in the U.S. (2) According to new research, if you can switch out your intake of refined sugar and use pure raw honey instead, the health benefits can be enormous.

What is raw honey? It’s a pure, unfiltered and unpasteurized sweetener made by bees from the nectar of flowers. Most of the honey consumed today is processed honey that’s been heated and filtered since it was gathered from the hive. Unlike processed honey, raw honey does not get robbed of its incredible nutritional value and health powers. It can help with everything from low energy to sleep problems to seasonal allergies. Switching to raw honey may even help weight-loss efforts when compared to diets containing sugar or high fructose corn syrup. I’m excited to tell you more about one of my all-time favorite natural sweetenerstoday.

8 Health Benefits of Raw Honey

1. Healthy Weight Management

Research studies have linked honey consumption with weight loss. A San Diego State University study found that replacing sugar with honey can actually help prevent packing on extra pounds and also lower blood sugar. The results also suggest that in comparison to sugar, honey may lower serum triglycerides. (3

Another study from the University of Wyoming found that raw honey can activate hormones that suppress the appetite. In the double-blind randomly assigned study, appetite hormones and glycemic responses were measured in 14 healthy non-obese women after consuming a breakfast containing either honey or sugar. Overall, researchers concluded that honey consumption offers potential obesity protective effects. (4)

2. Counters Pollen Allergies

Raw honey contains bee pollen, which is known to ward off infections, provide natural allergy relief and boost overall immunity. Honey’s ability to prevent allergies is based on a concept called immunotherapy. How so? The bees in your neighborhood go from flower to flower collecting pollen that causes you to suffer, but when a you consume local raw honey, you also consume that same offending local pollen. After some time, an allergy sufferer may become less sensitive to this pollen that previously caused problems and experience less seasonal allergy symptoms. Many seasonal allergy sufferers have found local, raw honey to be helpful because it desensitizes them to the fauna triggering their allergic reaction.

A 2013 study found that eating honey at a high dose (one gram per kilogram of body weight of honey daily) can improve allergy symptoms over a period of eight weeks. Researchers absorbed that the honey consumption improved overall and individual symptoms of allergic rhinitis. (5) Allergic rhinitis is an allergic response that causes itchy, watery eyes, sneezing and other similar symptoms.

Some people say that a daily tablespoon of honey can actually act like an allergy shot. The type of honey is key though since pasteurized honey does not contain any pollen. For possible seasonal allergy relief, you need to consume raw honey with pollen in it.

3. Natural Energy Source

Raw honey contains natural sugars (80 percent), water (18 percent), and minerals, vitamins, pollen and protein (2 percent). It’s not surprising that honey has been called “the perfect running fuel.” It provides an easily absorbed supply of energy in the form of liver glycogen, making it ideal for energetic morning starts and as a pre- and post-exercise energy source. 

Studies at the University of Memphis Exercise and Sports Nutrition Laboratory have shown honey to be one of the best choices of carbohydrate to consume right before exercising. Additionally, studies have revealed that as a sporting fuel, honey performs on a par with glucose, which is the sugar used in most commercial energy gels. (6)

When it comes to raw honey’s use in athletic endeavors, I highly recommend raw honey for both fueling and recovery. That’s why raw honey is included in some of the best pre-workout snacksand post-workout meals.

4. Antioxidant Powerhouse

Studies have shown that a daily dose of raw honey raises levels of health-promoting antioxidants in the body. Antioxidants help block free radicals in the body that cause disease. It also boosts the immune system, acting as a preventative against any number of diseases. Honey contains polyphenols, which are powerful antioxidants that have been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer.

One study fed 25 subjects about four tablespoons of honey per day for 29 days in addition to their regular diets. When blood samples were taken at the start and end of the study, researchers found a clear, direct link between honey consumption and an increased level of disease-fighting polyphenols in the blood. (7)

Studies have shown that honey contains the disease-fighting antioxidant flavonoids pinocembrin, pinostrobin and chrysin. (8) Pinocembrin supports enzyme activity, and many studies have shown that pinocembrin induces apoptosis (programmed cell death) of many types of cancer cells. (9) Laboratory research suggests that chrysin may increase the male hormone testosterone and improve bodybuilding results, but human research hasn’t found any effect on testosterone levels. (10)'

5. Sleep Promoter

Raw honey promotes restorative sleep in two ways. By consuming honey before bedtime, it restocks the liver’s glycogen supply and prevents the brain from triggering a crisis search for fuel, which can wake you up. Secondly, eating raw honey fosters the release of melatonin in the brain by creating a small spike in insulin levels, which stimulates the release of tryptophan in the brain. Tryptophan converts to serotonin, which is then converted to melatonin. (11)

Melatonin also boosts immunity and helps rebuild tissue during periods of rest. Poor sleep, by comparison, has been shown to be a risk factor for hypertension, obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke and arthritis. As honey is a proven natural sleep aid, it naturally lowers the risk of all these health problems.

6. Wound and Ulcer Healer

Honey-infused bandages are known to aid healing. Peter Charles Molan at the University of Waikato, New Zealand, has found in multiple studies that honey is a natural antibacterial with wound-healing effects. He also found that honey reacts with the body’s fluids to make hydrogen peroxide, creating an inhospitable environment for bacteria. (12)

For the treatment of burns and wounds, honey is typically applied directly to the problem area or in a dressing that’s changed every 24 to 48 hours. Sometimes the dressing is left in place for up to 25 days. (13) A combination of honey and ghee has also been advocated and used as dressing for infected wounds since 1991 in four Mumbai hospitals. (14)

Honey has been studied for its use in effectively treating various types of ulcers as well. Honey may reduce the size, pain and odor of problematic skin ulcers. (15)

7. Diabetes Aid

Consumption of raw honey can reduce the risk of developing diabetes and help aid medication used to treat diabetes. The combination of raw honey and cinnamon can be especially beneficial to healthy blood sugar management, as well as many other health concerns like gingivitis and acne.

According to a study out of Dubai, honey has been observed to cause a lower elevation of plasma glucose levels in diabetics compared to dextrose and sucrose. Some suggest that the insulin-boosting power of cinnamon can counteract this glucose elevation in honey, which would make your honey and cinnamon mixture a low glycemic index food combination. (16)

Raw honey increases insulin and decreases hyperglycemia. Try consuming a little at a time and see how your blood sugar reacts to it, and add both raw honey and cinnamon to your diabetic diet plan.

8. Natural Cough Syrup

Raw honey has been shown to be as effective in treating coughsas over-the-counter commercial cough syrups. Increasing scientific evidence shows that a single dose of honey can reduce mucus secretion and coughs. In one study, honey was just as effective as diphenhydramine and dextromethorphan, common ingredients found in over-the counter cough medicines. (17)

For a cough, a half teaspoon to two teaspoons of honey at bedtime is a studied and recommended dosage for anyone over the age of one.


How to Find and Use Raw Honey

Looking at honey consumption, 50 percent of the population directly purchases honey, 35 percent never eats honey, and the remaining 15 percent consumes honey in products made with honey, like honey-roasted peanuts. (18) Raw honey might be available at your nearest grocery store, but it should be available at your local health food store or, even better, your local beekeeper. It’s also available online.

Expect raw honey to be opaque rather than that sparkling, clear, golden color that’s achieved through heating.

Never cook with raw honey because that will destroy its good properties. Also, do not store it near a heat source. If you enjoy honey in your tea or coffee, wait until the drink is just tepid enough to sip comfortably, and then add honey to taste.

Drizzle it on breakfast cereals, over your sprouted grain toast or on yogurt. It’s also a great addition to smoothies and salad dressings, plus it pairs well with fruits like honeydew and apples. Raw honey can be a healthy alternative to highly processed sugar in recipes that doesn’t require heat. For every one tablespoon of sugar in a recipe (that doesn’t require heating), you can typically use two teaspoons of honey instead.

Need more ideas for how to incorporate raw honey into your daily life? Then check out this article on 20 Raw Honey Uses that will surprise you.

There are many recipes available from the National Honey Board, and I have some of my favorites as well:


Honey Comparisons

Raw Honey vs. Not Raw

Raw honey is a crude form of honey immediately taken out of the cells of the honey combs within a bee hive. This form of honey is far from pure. It commonly contains bee pollen and propolis, which are both two very positive health additions. However, raw honey can also possibly contain dead bees, legs, wings, hunks of beeswax and other impurities. Don’t worry though — if any of these unwanted items get into the honey they’re strained out before bottling.

Raw honey cannot be heated above 95 degrees Fahrenheit, which is the normal temperature of the bee hive. While it’s OK to strain raw honey, it’s never filtered or pasteurized. It also cannot have any other additives.

On the other hand, commercial honey is often heavily processed and may even have been chemically refined. Excessive heat destroys the natural enzymes, vitamins and minerals in honey, making honey processing a very bad thing. Filtering and processing eliminate many of the beneficial phytonutrients, including pollen and enzyme-rich propolis. The only way to achieve sparkling clear honey is by heat, so avoid the golden, syrup-like honey in favor of opaque, organic raw honey.

Non-raw honey or regular commercial honey can be sourced from bees that are treated with antibiotics (such as ciprofloxacin in China’s honey). They also may likely be given winter nourishment in the form of sugar or a low-cost syrup. Hives are made of non-organic materials, which can have pests and be cleaned with non-organic substances. Honey that isn’t raw is pasteurized and filtered, and it can have additives. (19)

Research by the Palynology Research Laboratory at Texas A&M University tested 60 honey products from supermarkets and grocery stores and found that 76 percent contained no trace of bee pollen, which is also loaded with health benefits. The Food and Drug Administration maintains that any honey products that have been ultra-filtered, as these have, are not actually honey and therefore the health benefits of honey cannot be assumed. Some “honey” may even contain high fructose corn syrup.

Organic Honey vs. Not Organic

Organic honey usually means raw organic honey. Just like with raw honey, heating is not allowed above 95 degrees F. In order to be called organic, honey must follow good organic management, according to each country’s set of standards and conditions. Processing should also only be done by means of gravitational settling and straining.

Manuka vs. Other Varieties

“Conductivity” is an indirect way of measuring the mineral content of a honey. Manuka honey has a higher than normal conductivity with about four times the conductivity of normal flower honeys. The higher the conductivity, the better the nutritional value of the honey.

When it comes to Manuka honey versus other varieties, Manuka always has a unique Manuka factor (UMF), which is a global standard in identifying and measuring the antibacterial strength of Manuka. Essentially, the UMF is a guarantee that the honey being sold is of a medicinal quality. This is a standard of health value completely unique to Manuka honey.

The minimum UMF rating recognized is UMF5 — however, it’s not considered beneficial unless it carries a UMF10+ level of antibacterial activity in the honey. Anything ranging from UMF10—UMF15 is a useful level, and anything UMF16 and up is considered a superior quality. While other honeys, like organic raw honey, can certainly have hugely positive health effects, they don’t have this exact measurement or rating like Manuka.

The National Honey Board, “an industry-funded agriculture promotion group that educates consumers about the benefits and uses for honey and honey products,” according to its website, also has more info on honey varieties. One healthy option is fermented honey. Also, if you see crystallization in your honey, it may mean there’s an overabundance of sugars, so keep an eye out. It is a natural process, however.

Polyfloral Honey vs. Monofloral Honey

No matter the variety of honey, each honey can be separated into either polyfloral honey or monofloral honey. What’s the difference? Monofloral honey comes from bees that utilize the nectar of just one flower species, hence mono, while polyfloral honey comes from bees that utilize nectar from multiple flower sources. (19a)


Raw Honey Nutrition Facts 

Honey is one of nature’s purest foods and is far more than just a natural sweetener. It’s a “functional food,” which means it’s a natural food with health benefits. Raw honey nutrition is impressive. Raw honey contains 22 amino acids, 27 minerals and 5,000 enzymes. Minerals include ironzincpotassiumcalciumphosphorousmagnesium and selenium. Vitamins found in honey include vitamin B6, thiamin, riboflavin, pantothenic acid and niacin. In addition, the nutraceuticals contained in honey help neutralize damaging free radical activity.

One tablespoon of honey contains 64 calories, yet it has a healthy glycemic load around 10 for one tablespoon, which is a little less than a banana. Raw honey does not cause a sugar spike and elevated insulin release like white sugar.

Although honey is an affordable food, bees spend thousands of hours collecting pollen from around 2 million flowers to make one pound of pure honey. Honey is typically about 18 percent water, but the lower the water content, the better the quality of honey. Best of all, honey does not need special storage or refrigeration — use it by the spoonful straight from the jar.


Raw Honey History and Interesting Facts 

  • Throughout history honey has been an important food. God used honey to motivate the Israelite people when He told them to, “Go up to the land flowing with milk and honey.” (Exodus 33:3)
  • Raw honey has been used as medicine since ancient times.
  • For centuries, honey was considered sacred due to its wonderfully sweet properties as well as its rarity. It was used in religious ceremonies and to embalm the deceased.
  • Apiculture, or the practice of beekeeping to produce honey, dates back to at least 700 B.C.
  • Honey was used by runners in the Olympic Games in ancient Greece as an energy source.
  • The health benefits of honey depend on the quality of a specific honey.
  • Raw honey contains small amounts of the same resins found in propolis as well as bee pollen.
  • When raw honey is overly processed and heated, the health benefits are largely eliminated.

Raw Honey Possible Allergies and Potential Side Effects

Honey is considered safe when taken by mouth in normal food amounts or recommended dosages. However, honey should never be given to children under 12 months of age since raw honey is a potential source of botulism spores. Raw honey is not a danger to older children or adults, just to infants. However, if you have a compromised immune system or are undergoing chemotherapy or radiation treatments for cancer, you should speak with your doctor before consuming raw honey.

If you’re allergic or sensitive to celery, pollen or have other bee-related allergies, you should not consume raw honey. Honey made from plants in the Rhododendron genus can also cause allergic reactions due to toxicity. (20)

Proverbs 25:16 says, “Do you like honey? Don’t eat too much, or it will make you sick!” Although honey is one of the healthiest sweeteners, it still should certainly be used in moderation. Mild honey intoxication side effects can include weakness, dizziness, vomiting, sweating and nausea. Other more serious side effects of honey consumption are unlikely unless you consume way too much.

In addition, when heated at high temperatures, honey has been shown to produce hydroxymethyl furfuraldehyde (HMF). The study, conducted on rats, found that when heated to 60 degrees Celsius to 140 degrees C, there was a significant rise in HMF.(21) Why is this important to note? HMF can cause deleterious effects and is considered carcinogenic.


Raw Honey Final Thoughts

  • Raw honey is the most crude and natural form of honey you can purchase.
  • It’s unfiltered and unpasteurized, which means there is no processing or heating to decrease its natural vitamin and mineral content.
  • Raw honey contains disease-preventing and disease-fighting flavonoids.
  • Raw honey contains both propolis and bee pollen so you get the benefits of those two natural powerhouses as well.
  • It has been scientifically proven to help with allergies, diabetes, sleep problems, coughs and wound healing.
  • Raw honey is a smart part of a pre- and post-workout snack for better energy during a workout and better recovery afterward.
  • Look for a local beekeeper to source your raw honey. This will make it even more likely to help with seasonal allergies.

Source: https://draxe.com/the-many-health-benefits-of-raw-honey/ 

Food Truck Websites and Menus

food truck

Click on truck name for more info on each truck company

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesdays from 11:00 - 2:00PM

Akita Sushi

3 Brothers Kitchen

Casablanca Mediterranean Food
Chick-n-Chill
Curry Up Now

Gourmet Grillin & Catering

Hongry Kong
Hookt Mini Doughnuts

Kenny's Heart and Soul

Licensed 2 Grill

Mustache Mike's

No Worries

Road Dogs
Rocio's Ice Cream Tacos
Roderick's BBQ

Siam Loco Wraps
Southern Comfort Kitchen
Stuff My Waffle

Taqueria Angelica's

We Sushi
WoKitchen


Dining Commons online menu 

can help you plan your meal before you leave your office. You can build your plate online and enter your food items into the nutritional calculator to assist with chosing items that will agree with your health goals and/or any special diet. 


Download the Vegetarian/Vegan guide for eating on campus

heart made of veggies

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