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Faculty

Tenure-Track Faculty

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Ana Almeida, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Dr. Almeida uses molecular tools to dissect the interplay between evolution and development. Her studies focus on how developmental mechanisms evolved to shape the diversity of plant form and function we see in nature today. She is also interested in understanding how genome evolution might have shaped the diversification of plants on Earth. Her work uses comparative genomics to study how genome modifications might have led to plant diversification.

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Chris Baysdorfer, Ph.D.

Professor

Dr. Baysdorfer's laboratory works in the area of plant genomics. His lab has contributed to the initial efforts to sequence and map maize cDNAs and pine cDNAs. His current studies focus on the genomes of plants in the Family Liliaceae, a group with the largest genome size of any higher plant. The objective of his research is to understand the mechanism of expansion of these genomes and to identify the selective advantage, if any, conferred by large genomes.

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Ken Curr, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Dr. Curr's research is based on three areas of study, molecular virology (GB Virus Type C/HIV-1), marine invertebrate immunology and population genetics (the nudibranch Tritonia tetraquetra) and finally, heavy metal bioremediation using cyanobacteria (Spirulina plantensis/maximus).

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Tyler Evans, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Dr. Evans lab is interested in how shifts in abiotic variables affect the performance of marine organisms, particularly within the scope of global climate change. His work strives to characterize responses to the environment across levels of biological organization and elucidate differences that exist between populations or species in their capacity to respond to environmental change. Ultimately, this information is useful in developing predictions as to how organisms will fare in future environments. For more information about his research please visit his website.

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Donald Gailey, Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus
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Maria Gallegos, Ph.D.

Professor and Graduate Program Coordinator

The laboratory of Dr. Gallegos is focused on understanding how a neuron's complex morphology is established and maintained throughout the life of an animal. Their long-term goal is to identify the genes, and understand the molecular mechanisms, that specifically control late steps in neurodevelopment using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans

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Pascale Guiton, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Dr. Guiton's research focuses on understanding the interactions of the parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, with its host. Specifically, she uses classic and novel molecular techniques to identify and characterize new determinants of Toxoplasma pathogenicity in vitro andin vivo.  For more information about her work please visit her website
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Michael Hedrick, Ph.D.

Professor

Dr. Hedrick is a comparative physiologist with primary interests in respiratory, cardiovascular and exercise physiology in ectothermic vertebrates. Recent projects include regulation of lymphatics and baroreflexes in anuran amphibians, regulation of respiratory rhythm generation during development in amphibians, and meta-analyses of maximal O2 and CO2 flux rates in vertebrates.

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Caron Inouye, Ph.D.

Professor and Director of General Education

Dr. Inouye has two major areas of interest, educational research/reform and environmental toxicology. She has been most active recently in the former line of work, focusing on specific pedagogical and curricular reform strategies that increase student success in college. She has also been active in several grant programs that provide professional development for K12 science teachers.  Although Dr. Inouye serves the broader CSUEB student community as the Director of General Education and Chair of General Studies, she remains a dedicated biology professor.   

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Chris Kitting, Ph.D.

Professor

Dr. Kitting’s research area is focused on non-destructive field methods to determines ecological limits on animal and plant populations near various shorelines and to improve conservation and management of natural resources. That management now includes reversing those limits to restore habits and ecosystems as vital, sustainable. life support systems, such as fisheries nursery habitats in wetlands, shoreline stabilization, biological filtration, and natural recycling and improving water and atmosphere.

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Carol Lauzon, Ph.D.

Professor

The main focus of Dr. Lauzon's lab involves exploring microbial symbioses with an aim of understanding the role of microorganisms in host success, survival, and evolution. Applied aspects of this work include manipulation of symbioses for plant, insect, and animal pathogen control. Her work also includes research into the culture of microorganisms typically considered refractory to culture, including archaea species residing in extreme environments. Her lab also explores the use of new technologies to detect and identify foodborne pathogens.

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James Murray, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

The Murray lab does research on sensory reception and how nerve cells control behaviors, mostly working on sea slugs. Students in his lab work on various projects such as animal orientation and navigation behaviors, magnetic orientation, how the brain controls crawling and turning, as well as how sea slugs are able to consume neurotoxic prey. Murray lab also collaborates with other investigators to understand population genetics, mapping of gene expression in sensory organs, and the biochemistry of detoxification.

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Maria Nieto, Ph.D.

Professor

Dr. Nieto’s most recent science based work centers on the subject of sex and gender where she has written popular press articles and the only biology based amicus brief submitted to the Supreme Court of the United States in support of marriage equality. Dr. Nieto’s work in fiction includes two award-winning novels, The Water of Life Remains in the Dead (2015) and Pig Behind The Bear (2012). Both books feature a feisty Chicana who investigates crimes against the most vulnerable among us - immigrants and children. Dr. Nieto also has a published short story entitled, Pan De Muerto. For more information about her work please visit her website.

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Nazzy Pakpour, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Dr. Pakpour's laboratory is currently working on the following projects: 1) Examining the impact of type 2 diabetes on malaria parasite development and transmission; 2) Using hackathons as an educational and community building activity for college students; 3) Establishing an insect petting zoo to travel to local schools. For more information about any of these projects, her lab, or the classes she teaches please visit her website.

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Brian Perry, Ph.D.

Associate Professor and Department Chair

Dr. Perry's research integrates studies of fungal biodiversity and molecular phylogenetic analyses with data from disciplines such as genetics, ecology and geography to address broad questions of how these biological and physical processes interact to drive evolution. Please visit Dr. Perry's website for more information.

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Claudia Uhde-Stone, Ph.D.

Professor

Dr. Stone’s lab uses transcriptomics (RNA-sequencing), proteomics (mass spectrometry) and genome editing (CRISPR-Cas) to better understand how plants function. 

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Erica L. Wildy, Ph.D.

Faculty 

Dr. Wildy is a behavioral ecologist by training with interests in animal behavior, behavioral ecology, and herpetology. She also conducts research in undergraduate science education, where her work involves examination of student learning at the undergraduate level, and identifying and understanding the mechanisms contributing to enhanced student engagement in the classroom. Dr. Wildy is also a Presidential Appointee to the Grade Appeal and Academic Grievance Committee.

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