ACCOUNTING & FINANCE COURSE STUDENT LEARNING OUT COMES

ACCT 2251: Introduction to Financial Accounting

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Acquire knowledge about general aspects of business operations.
  • Describe the role of accounting information system and its limitations.
  • Explain the concepts and procedures of financial reporting, including income statement, statement of retained earnings, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows.
  • Identify the basic economic events most common in business operations and be able to report the events in a generally accepted manner, including the impacts of alternative accounting methods on financial statements.
  • Tabulate the basic differences between the Generally Accepted Accounting Standards (GAAP) in the United States and the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).
  • Locate and analyze financial data from annual reports of corporations.

 

ACCT 2253: Introduction to Managerial Accounting

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Identify cost classifications based on how the cost will be used: whether for preparing external reports, predicting cost behavior, assigning costs to cost objects, or decision making.
  • Identify the costing method to use in custom situations and in mass-production situations and know how to apply those methods.
  • Identify various cost classifications based on how costs respond to changes in production levels, and how those changes affect managements’ decision to expand or reduce capacity levels.
  • Explain the critical tradeoffs existing between total cost and sales volume in determining desired profit goals.
  • Prepare an income statement required for external reporting and a different one more useful to managers for managerial decision-making.
  • Evaluate business segments and the managers responsible for those business segments.
  • Prepare and evaluate operating as well as capital budgets.
  • Identify costs which may be relevant or irrelevant to a given management decision at hand.
  • Discuss the ethical constraints that guide a manager in pursuing his/her ultimate goal of maximizing the value of the firm.

 

ACCT 2701: Legal Environment of Business 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Explain basic legal terminology.
  • Identify the structure of the federal, state and local court systems.
  •  Describe court procedures.
  • Summarize the difference between courts and alternative dispute resolution forums.
  • Distinguish the authorities defined in the United States Constitution to regulate business.
  • Recognize the role of ethics in business decision making.
  • Define the elements of causes of action for intentional torts.
  • Define the elements of causes of action for negligence and strict liability.
  • Explain the rights and responsibilities associated with various forms of intellectual property such as trademarks, copyrights and patents.
  • Distinguish the basic differences between criminal law and civil law.
  • Discuss the basics of contract law such as offer, acceptance, consideration, and capacity to contract.

 

ACCT 3170: Accounting Information Systems I

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Describe in detail the purpose of accounting information systems and the links between business structure, processes, performance, and information systems.
  •  Analyze information flows in an organization and develop conceptual models of organizational relationships.
  • Use the software packages QuickBooks and Microsoft Excel to implement the conceptual models of information systems, and demonstrate how that knowledge transfers to a variety of comparable systems and software packages.
  • Identify organizational risk and control issues, incorporate those issues into conceptual models, and explain how information technology changes control techniques.
  • Justify business decisions based on a systematic and objective consideration of the problems, issues, and relative merits of feasible alternatives using appropriate decision-modeling techniques.
  • Use and apply prevalent business-related technology:
  1. Appropriately use electronic spreadsheets, database applications, and other software to build models and relational databases.
  2. Recognize commonly used information architectures.
  3. Describe risks and related issues about privacy, intellectual property rights, and security considerations related to electronic commerce and communications.
  4. Develop and communicate reasonable recommendations for technology use in organizations.

 

 

ACCT 3211: Intermediate Financial Account I 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Describe the conceptual framework of accounting.
  • Identify the regulatory environment and professional bodies that impact the accounting profession.
  • Identify events that need to be recorded in the accounting records.
  • Prepare accounting records and financial statements from source documents in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Standards.
  • Explain and be sensitive to the ethical and economic dimensions of accounting decisions.
  • Explain accounting issues related to recognition and valuation of accounts receivable
  • Explain the accounting for various inventory methods.
  • Identify and explain the five steps in the revenue recognition process.
  • Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

 

ACCT 3212: Intermediate Financial Account II

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Solve present value problems to determine, bond price, lease payment, pension obligation.
  • Identify and determine the costs to include in initial valuation of property, plant, and equipment, including self-constructed assets and those acquired through exchange.
  • Compare different depreciation methods, including activity methods, straight-line methods, and decreasing-charge methods.
  • Explain the accounting issue related to asset impairment.
  • Explain the accounting for loss contingency.
  • Apply the methods of bond discount and premium amortization, including effective interest method and straight-line method.
  • Contrast the operating and capitalization methods of recording leases for both lessee and lessor.
  • Identify the categories of equity securities and describe the accounting and reporting treatment for each category.

 

ACCT 3213: Intermediate Financial Account III 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Describe temporary differences that results in future taxable and future deductible amounts and their treatment in the financial statements
  • Identify types of pension plans and the components of pension expense
  • Identify the key components of stockholders’ equity
  • Describe the accounting for treasury stock
  • Describe the accounting for convertible securities
  • Describe the accounting for stock compensation plan
  • Compute earnings per share in a: 1) simple capital structure; 2) complex capital structure
  • Describe the accounting for changes in: 1) accounting principles; 2) changes in estimates; and 3) correction of errors
  • Prepare a statement of cash flows under: 1) direct method; 2) indirect method

 

ACCT 3220: Tax Accounting: Fundamentals and Individuals

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Summarize the tax environment and the federal tax compliance process.
  • Explain the fundamentals of tax planning.
  • Determine and measure taxable income.
  • Recognize the tax treatment of asset acquisitions.
  • Identify the tax consequences and planning implications of property dispositions.
  • Summarize the individual tax formula and compensation and retirement tax issues.
  • Interpret tax aspects of individual investment planning and personal activities.

 

ACCT 3230: Cost Management

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Recognize that job-order and process costing are being used in service, merchandising as well as manufacturing sectors.
  • Use job-order costing to cost one or a small number of jobs which require different types and amounts of direct materials, direct labor and indirect costs.
  • Use the process costing system to prepare and analyze production reports where a large number of homogeneous products are manufactured.
  • Estimate the cost of defective units in a process costing environment.
  • Summarize company strategy, and explain how the Balanced Scorecard is used to implement company strategy, enabling the company to analyze the profitability resulting from implementing its strategy.
  • Identify the cost savings resulting from controlling the cost of ordering and carrying inventory as well as the cost of stocking-out.
  • Distinguish whether a joint product should be sold at the split-off point or processed further, and explain how allocation of joint costs to joint products leads to better product and service pricing decisions.
  • Identify the critical role of cost allocation in the analysis of customer profitability and sales variances.
  • Explain the increase in the accuracy of determining the cost of cost objects resulting from allocation of support departments to operating departments; and from identifying common costs and revenues.

 

ACCT 3280: Accounting for Governmental and Nonprofit Entities 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Identify the format and content of a Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for state and local governments.
  • Explain the difference between economic resource measurement focus and current financial resource measurement focus, and full accrual basis of accounting and modified accrual basis of accounting.
  • For state and local governments, identify the title of budgetary accounts, record legally adopted budget, and record encumbrance in accounting system.
  • Describe the types of fund within state and local governments and associated measurement focus and basis of accounting in each fund.
  • Recognize, measure and record non-exchange revenue transaction in governmental funds within state and local governments.
  • Recognize, measure and record expenditure in governmental funds within state and local governments.
  • Recognize and record interfund activities within state and local governments.
  • Describe the differences in presentation between governmental funds on fund financial statements and governmental activities on government-wide financial statements.
  • Identify the format and content of financial statements for a not-for-profit organization.
  • Record various types of revenues of a not-for-profit organization into appropriate categories of net assets.
  • Record expenses of a not-for-profit organization, including recording net assets released from restriction.
  • Determine the amount of net patient revenues reported on financial statement of health care organizations.

 

ACCT 4211: Advanced Financial Accounting 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Apply accounting techniques and methods for the formation, dissolution, partner changes, earnings distribution, and liquidation of partnerships.
  • Describe various accounting theories in translating financial statements of a foreign subsidiary to U.S. Dollars.
  • Demonstrate and determine the impacts on parent company’s financial statements from applying different foreign currency translation methods.
  • Explain the development of consolidation theories, current issues of consolidation, and accounting standards in U.S. GAAP and IFRS.
  • Prepare consolidated financial statements as of the date of acquisition and for periods subsequent to the date of acquisition for 100% and partially owned subsidiaries.
  • Show adjustments to consolidated financial statements from intra-entity transactions between the parent company and its 100% or partially owned subsidiaries.

 

ACCT 4220: Tax Accounting: Corporate Tax

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Identify the tax consequences relating to the formation of a corporation.
  • Calculate a corporation’s taxable income and tax liability.
  • Interpret the GAAP financial statement implications of corporate income tax.
  • Identify the tax consequences and planning strategies associated with corporate distributions—including dividends, redemptions, and liquidations.
  • Identify the tax consequences and planning strategies associated with electing S Corporation status.

 

ACCT 4221: Tax Accounting: Partnerships, Gifts, Estates, Trusts

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

    • Recognize the tax consequences and planning implications of a partnership’s formation, operation, and liquidation.
    • Prepare Form 1065, the partnership income tax information return.
    • Explain the tax consequences and strategies associated with the income taxation of trusts and estates.
    • Prepare IRS Form 1041, the trust and estate income tax return.
    • Explain the tax consequences and strategies associated with the federal gift tax.
    • Explain the tax consequences and strategies associated with the federal estate tax.
    • Analyze a complex estate and gift tax situation, identify the pertinent tax compliance and planning issues, apply the law and suggest appropriate strategies.

 

ACCT 4223: Business Law for Accountants

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Summarize basic contract law and explain advanced contract concepts such as the Statute of Frauds, assignment, delegation, performance and discharge, breach of contract and remedies.
  • Describe the Uniform Commercial Code and domestic sales and lease contracts, title, risk and insurable interest.
  • Explain the basic concepts of warranties and product liability.
  • Explain legal concepts related to negotiable instruments, creditors’ rights and bankruptcy.
  • Name the requirements to form and terminate an agency relationship.
  • Explain basic employment, labor law and employment discrimination concepts.
  • Summarize the advantages and disadvantages of business entities such as the C and S Corporations, sole proprietorships, partnerships, limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, and limited liability companies.
  • Identify the formation and financing of corporations and the roles of corporate shareholders, directors, and officers.
  • Name the requirements of corporate mergers and acquisitions.
  • Explain the requirements of federal and state securities laws.
    • Name the basic terminology associated with real and personal property.

 

ACCT 4250: Auditing I

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Explain the audit process including the professional standards applicable to the financial statement audit of SEC registrants.
  • Explain the professional standards to the financial statement audit of entities not subject to the provisions of Sarbanes-Oxley Act 2002.
  • Describe the application of auditing procedures to select transaction cycles.
  • Assess manual and information systems controls.
  • Identify and describe sampling methodologies commonly used within the audit profession.
  • Explain the ethical and legal responsibilities of financial statement auditors in the public accounting profession.
  • Develop and demonstrate problem solving and critical thinking skills essential to solve unstructured auditing problems.

 

ACCT 4253: Internal Accounting

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Explain the internal audit process including the professional standards applicable to the internal audit profession.
  • Explain the professional standards required for internal audit functions operating under the auspices of The Institute of Internal Auditors’ International Practices Framework.
  • Describe the application of internal auditing procedures to performance, operational, efficiency & effectiveness, and financial related audits.
  • Assess manual and information system controls.
  • Identify and describe sampling methodologies commonly used within the audit profession.
  • Explain the ethical and legal responsibilities of auditors in the internal audit profession.
  • Develop and apply problem solving and critical thinking skills essential to solve unstructured auditing problems.

 

ACCT 4370: International Accounting 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Identify the contributing factors in the development of accounting systems internationally.
  • Compare and classify a country’s accounting system.
  • Prepare foreign currency translation adjustments under the current rate and temporal methods.
  • Identify the source of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and major differences with US GAAP.
  • Describe the different techniques used when analyzing international financial statements.
  • Identify major issues in international management and control systems.

 

ACCT 4911: Accounting Ethics 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Recognize whether there is a(n) ethical issue(s) involved in any particular business situation.
  • Summarize the different approaches to ethical reasoning.
  • Use ethical reasoning in dealing with a(n) ethical dilemma(s).
  • Describe the codes of conduct that apply to accountants.
  • Recognize the ethical responsibilities an accountant has in conducting an audit and in the working environment.
  • Justify an appropriate conclusion to an ethical dilemma.

 

ACCT 6015: Financial Accounting

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Identify and explain the four financial statements.
  • Describe the accounting principles and regulations that frame financial statements.
  • Describe information conveyed by the financial statements.
  • Analyze and record transactions, prepare accounting adjustments, construct financial statements, and close the books for the accounting period.
  • Compute and interpret measures of profitability and risk.
  • Explain revenue recognition criteria and describe accounting for operating expenses.
  • Describe and explain accounting for different operating assets such as receivables, inventories, and property, plant and equipment.
  • Explain accounting for passive investments and equity method investments.
  • Describe the accounting for current operating liabilities and current and long-term non-operating liabilities.
  • Describe and illustrate the accounting for contributed capital and earned capital.

 

ACCT 6202 - Corporate Tax

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Determine the tax consequences relating to the formation of a corporation.
  • Calculate a corporation’s taxable income and tax liability, and prepare a simple corporate return.
  • Summarize the GAAP financial statement implications of corporate income tax.
  • Identify the tax consequences and planning strategies associated with corporate distributions—including dividends, redemptions, and liquidations.
  • Identify the tax consequences and compliance issues associated with S Corporations.
  • Analyze a complex corporate tax situation, identify the pertinent tax compliance and planning issues, apply the law and suggest appropriate strategies.

 

ACCT 6215 - Managerial Accounting

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Explain how an organization’s mission, goals, and strategies affect managerial accounting
  • Identify basic patterns of cost behavior and explain methods for cost estimation
  • Apply cost-volume-profit analysis to find a break-even point and for preliminary profit planning
  • Apply differential analysis to decision scenarios, including whether to change plans, to accept a special order; to make, buy, or outsource; and to sell or further process a product
  • Explain the operation of a job costing system
  • Explain the operation of a process costing system
  • Describe the implementation of an activity-based costing system
  • Explain customer profitability analysis based on ABC
  • Describe basic approaches to budgeting
  • Explain and develop a basic manufacturing budget
  • Differentiate between static and flexible budgets for performance reporting
  • Determine and interpret direct materials, direct labor and overhead cost variances
  • Calculate revenue variances and prepare a performance report for a revenue center

 

ACCT 6560 – Financial Statement Analysis and business Valuation 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Identify and assess the economic characteristics and dynamics that drive competition in an industry.
  • Evaluate firm profitability using measures of firm performance - net income - as well as profitability analysis techniques including per share analysis, common-size analysis, percentage change analysis, and alternative measures of income.
  • Compare the profitability of firms using the rate of return on assets and its components:  profit margin and total assets turnover.
  • Evaluate short-term liquidity risk, long-term solvency risk, credit risk and bankruptcy risk, systematic risk and fraudulent financial reporting risk.
  • Describe the concept of quality of accounting information, including the attributes of economic content and earnings sustainability.
  • Develop financial statement forecasts including balance sheets, income statements, and statement of cash flows.
  • Estimate risk-adjusted expected rates of return on equity capital, as well as weighted average costs of capital, to discount future payoffs to present value.
  • Estimate the firm value using dividend-based valuation approaches.
  • Estimate firm value using the free cash flows based valuation methods.
  • Estimate the firm value using the residual income valuation method.
  • Compute the firm value using market-based approaches.
  • Determine the impact of the following factors on market multiples, (a) risk and the cost of equity capital, (b) growth, (c) differences between current and expected future earnings, and (d) alternative accounting methods and principles.

 

ACCT 6611: Financial Reporting and IFRS I

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Explain the conceptual framework for financial reporting under both the U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and international financial reporting standards (IFRS).
  • Describe and apply the time value of money concepts.
  • Prepare an income statement and detect issues dealing with its content, presentation, and disclosure.
  • Prepare and interpret a classified balance sheet.
  • Identify and explain the five steps in the revenue recognition process.
  • Specify the measurement and valuation issues and the related income statement effects of transactions involving cash, accounts receivable, and inventories, including the key similarities and differences between GAAP and IFRS.

 

ACCT 6612 – Financial Reporting and IFRS II

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

    • Demonstrate the time value of money concepts into valuation of bonds, long-term note payable and leases.
    • Summarize the measurement and valuation issues and the related financial statement effects of transactions involving operational assets, including the key differences between GAAP and IFRS.
    • Prepare amortization schedule for bonds, long-term note payable and leases, and link schedule to accounting records and financial statements.
    • Describe the accounting criteria for capitalizing leases by the lessee and by the lessor, exemplify technique used by the lessee in practice so as to classify a lease as an operating lease, and identify the key differences between GAAP and IFRS in terms of lease classification.
    • Identify the categories of debt securities and equity securities and describe the accounting and reporting treatment for each category.

 

ACCT 6613 – Financial Reporting and IFRS III 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

  • Recognize events that need to be recorded in the accounting records
  • Prepare accounting records and financial statements from source documents in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Standards
  • Identify the major differences between financial and tax accounting
  • Explain and analyze financial statements, including their footnotes

 

ACCT 6620 – Advanced Topics in Financial Accounting 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

    • Demonstrate accounting techniques and methods for the formation, dissolution, partner changes, earnings distribution, and liquidation of partnerships.
    • Describe various accounting theories in translating financial statements of a foreign subsidiary to U.S. Dollars.
    • Demonstrate and determine the impacts on parent company’s financial statements from applying different foreign currency translation methods
    • Explain the development of consolidation theories, current issues of consolidation, and accounting standards in U.S. GAAP and IFRS.
    • Prepare consolidated financial statements as of the date of acquisition and for periods subsequent to the date of acquisition for 100% and partially owned subsidiaries.
    • Demonstrate adjustments to consolidated financial statements from intra-entity transactions between the parent company and its 100% or partially owned subsidiaries.

 

ACCT 6630 – Government and Not-for-profit Accounting

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Explain basic governmental accounting concepts such as measurement focus, basis of accounting, budgetary accounting, and fund accounting.
  • Identify the format and content of a Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for a governmental entity.
  • Recognize, measure and record encumbrances, nonexchange revenue transaction, expenditures, and interfund activity in a governmental entity.
  • Identify the format and content of financial statements for a not-for-profit entity.
  • Recognize, measure, record, and report revenues and expenses of a not-for-profit entity.

 

ACCT 6640 – Auditing Theory and Practice I

Upon completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Describe the financial auditing environment.
  • Compare selected auditing actions to generally accepted auditing standards (GAAS).
  • Describe the auditing standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB).
  • Develop problem solving and critical thinking skills essential to solve unstructured auditing problems.
  • Develop competency in using flowcharts to design audit programs of selected transaction cycles.
  • Develop competency in manual and information systems controls.
  • Assess internal control for audit planning.
  • Identify fraud prevention techniques.
  • Demonstrate application of analytical procedures in an audit situation.
  • Identify revenue and collection cycle evidence collection techniques.
  • Utilize analytical procedures to audit revenue and expense accounts.
  • Identify acquisition and expenditure cycle evidence collection techniques.
  • Identify audit situation ethical problems.

 

ACCT 6650 – Auditing Theory and Practice II 

Upon completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Integrate case application of the financial auditing environment.
  • Identify compilation and review services.
  • Identify internal and governmental financial auditing and operating auditing.
  • Demonstrate application of audit sampling techniques.
  • Demonstrate application of analytical procedures in an audit situation.
  • Develop problem solving and critical thinking skills essential to solve unstructured auditing problems.
  • Assess internal control for audit planning.
  • Describe the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) Internal Control Integrated Framework 2013.
  • Compare selected auditing actions to generally accepted auditing standards (GAAS).
  • Describe the auditing standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB).
  • Describe the International Auditing and Assurance Standards Board (IAASB) and International Standards on Auditing (ISAs).
  • Identify audit situation ethical problems.
  • Describe the International Ethics Standards Boards for Accountants (IESBA) and International Federation of Accountants (IFAC) Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants.

 

ACCT 6660 – Accountants' Ethics and Professional Responsibilities

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Recognize whether there is a(n) ethical issue(s) involved in any particular business situation.
  • Discuss the different approaches to ethical reasoning.
  • Demonstrate ethical reasoning in dealing with a(n) ethical dilemma(s)
  • Explain the codes of conduct that apply to accountants
  • Explain the ethical responsibilities an accountant has in conducting an audit and in the working environment
  • Communicate an appropriate conclusion to an ethical dilemma

  

ACCT 6670 - Business Law and Regulations

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Identify the seven elements of an effective compliance system.
  • Identify compliance weaknesses in an organization and propose policies, procedures and systems to improve compliance.
  • Summarize basic contract law and explain advanced contract concepts such as the Statute of Frauds, assignment, delegation, performance and discharge, breach of contract and remedies.
  • Describe the Uniform Commercial Code and domestic sales and lease contracts, title, risk and insurable interest.
  • Explain the basic concepts of warranties and product liability.
  • Explain legal concepts related to negotiable instruments, creditors’ rights and bankruptcy.
  • Name the requirements to form and terminate an agency relationship.
  • Explain basic employment, labor law and employment discrimination concepts.
  • Summarize the advantages and disadvantages of business entities such as the C and S Corporations, sole proprietorships, partnerships, limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, and limited liability companies.
  • Identify the formation and financing of corporations and the roles of corporate shareholders, directors, and officers.
  • Name the requirements of corporate mergers and acquisitions.
  • Explain the requirements of federal and state securities laws.
  • Name the basic terminology associated with real and personal property.

 

FIN 2300: Personal Finance 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Explain the basic financial literacy concepts that are useful for students moving from high school, to college, and on to their careers
  • Use these concepts to begin becoming financially independent, and “able to pursue your passions and your goals in life”  
  • Within this general context, students are expected to be able to:
  • Construct and manage your personal household budget
  • Construct an appropriate credit card and debt management plan
  • Analyze and improve your credit report and score
  • Design your savings plan
  • Design an investment plan, using the appropriate investment instruments and vehicles
  • Design an appropriate student loan management plan
  • Identify the conditions under which one would rent or buy a home
  • Describe the conditions in renting an apartment
  • Describe the conditions under which one would buy a car
  • Design your insurance plan (auto, home, renter’s, disability, life) in the context of your overall financial plan
  • Design a health insurance plan in accordance with the new federal health care law and the new Covered California guidelines
  • Describe the key elements that make a business successful

FIN 3300: Financial Management 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Explain corporate governance and some of the ethical issues financial managers face.
  • Explain time value of money and determine the present and future values of cash flows.
  • Describe the role of prices and interest rates in financial markets.
  • Define the components of risk, determine the level of each type of risk for a given financial asset, and explain the interplay of risk and return.
  • Compute the market value of financial assets such as bonds and stocks.
  • Calculate net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), profitability index (PI), and Payback Period (PP) of a single capital project and describe the capital budgeting process of a company.
  • Explain and compute the Weighted Average Cost of Capital of a company

FIN 3400: Fundamentals of Real Estate Management and Decision-Making 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Use Time Value of Money concepts in real estate investment decision-making.
  • Construct a Pro forma statement and use it in analyzing real estate investments.
  • Define and explain the three appraisal processes and their applications.
  • Define and explain the steps in the property development process.
  • Explain why location, location, location affects real estate demand, hence prices.
  • Discuss the government impact on property development and descriptions.
  • Analyze and explain REIT buy analyses and reports.

 

FIN 4300: Corporate Finance

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Describe working capital management and evaluate a company’s management of accounts receivable, inventory, and accounts payable over time.
  • Describe how firms raise venture capital, make initial public offering, and use private placement
  • Explain the capital structure and analyze how financing decisions influence firm value
  • Describe how dividends are paid and explain factors that affect a firm’s dividend policy
  • Compute the value of a firm using different methodologies.
  • Discuss how management uses financial planning models in the planning process and explain what factors determine a firm’s sustainable growth rate.

 

FIN 4310: Investment Analysis 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Define the major asset classes, various financial securities and features of those securities
  • Explain how financial securities are traded
  • Calculate and compare various measures of risk and return
  • Describe the key theories and concepts related to investment portfolios
  • Calculate bond values and yields and explain various bond investment strategies
  • Calculate equity values using alternative valuation models
  • Use information technology tools to find and trade financial securities

FIN 4315: Derivatives Markets

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Define derivatives and explain the characteristics of derivatives markets.
  • Define forward contracts, describe the pricing and valuation of forward contracts, and explain the characteristics of forward markets.
  • Define futures contracts, describe the pricing and valuation of futures contracts, and explain the characteristics of futures markets.
  • Define call and put options and explain the characteristics of options markets.
  • Calculate the option price by using the Binomial model and the Black-Scholes-Merton model.
  • Explain the trading, hedging, and risk management applications of forward, futures, and options.
  • Describe the characteristics of other derivatives such as swaps.
  • Explain the valuation and risk management applications of swap contracts.

 

FIN 4330: Financial Modeling 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Accurately compute the estimated market value of financial and non-financial assets using MS Excel-based models.
  • Analyze and assess corporate and financial market data through on-line data sources for use in the analysis of financial issues.
  • Efficiently retrieve, organize and analyze large amounts of data for use in Excel based models.
  • Distinguish the appropriate financial valuation model and use to value common asset classes. 

 

FIN 4370: Seminar in Financial Theory

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

  • Discuss selected topics in recent developments in financial theory and management practice.

 

FIN 4375: International Business Finance 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Identify the determinants of currency prices and explain how these prices change in the foreign exchange (FX) markets.
  • Distinguish how various exchange rate systems affect currency prices in the FX markets.
  • Explain how a country’s balance of payments affects currency prices in the FX markets.
  • Explain international parity conditions which link the prices of goods, interest rates, spot rates and forward rates throughout the world.
  • Explain the nature and source of exchange rate exposure.
  • Explain how exchange rate exposure may create risks and opportunities for domestic and multinational firms.
  • Compare and contrast the basic characteristics of various financial instruments in the currency markets (e.g. forward contracts, futures contracts, options, and swaps) and explain how these instruments may be used to hedge against exchange rate exposure.

 

FIN 4410: Financing Real Estate Operations 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Compute fixed-, adjustable-rate and other alternative mortgage payments.
  • Construct pro-forma statements for alternative financing such as participation, interest only, convertible and sale-leaseback loans.
  • Analyze construction financing including the construction and permanent (take-out) loan.
  • Construct limited partnerships financial analysis including ATIRR and NPV.
  • Analyze REIT financial statements for investment decision-making such as understanding the importance of FFO.
  • Compute pricing of MBSs including secondary mortgage market related derivative securities and applying option pricing techniques to price MBSs while incorporating prepayment and default risks
  • Compute duration for MBSs and understanding the effects of convexity on MBS pricing.

FIN 4415: Real Estate Investment Analysis and Advanced Appraisal 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Implement real estate appraisal models with data and interpret the results while incorporating feasibility and market analysis concepts.
  • Interpret mortgage yields and mortgage price indices.
  • Compute duration for mortgage bonds.
  • Analyze CMBS and default.
  • Demonstrate portfolio theory and CAPM in real estate investment.
  • Construct strategies for international real estate investment.
  • Explain the nature and source of exchange rate exposure.
  • Use real option techniques to analyze and value real estate development.

FIN 4420: Sustainable Real Estate Development 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Identify communities within cities/places that can benefit from sustainable real estate development.
  • Analyze Census demographic data to best address development revitalization specific to a city’s characteristics.
  • Link a city’s industry to their sustainable real estate development decision-making.
  • Identify land use mistakes and development opportunities.
  • Construct sensitivity analysis table based upon sustainable real estate development project by following the LEED system (see http://www.usgbc.org/).
  • Implement MARR to NPV model for a sustainable real estate development project.
  • Use sustainable building concepts to write sustainable a real estate development case study with a solution.

 

FIN 4470: Seminar in Advanced Topics in Real Estate

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Conduct housing research by following a step-by-step approach of identifying a housing question/issue/motivation, providing a literature review, collecting and discussing data (including descriptive statistics), discussing and using a specific methodology to analyze data, summarizing results, and providing a conclusion which includes policy implication(s). 
  • Use the hedonic methodology to estimate the value of housing characteristics such as a bedroom as well as the overall value of house prices. 
  • Explain advanced techniques of pricing mortgage backed securities in the secondary mortgage market.
  • Discuss the role GIS plays in real estate development and ARGUS plays in evaluating commercial leases.

 

FIN 4305: Entrepreneurial Finance 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Analyze the unique structure of venture capital industry.
  • Compare and contrast different forms of financing available to entrepreneurs.
  • Understand the unique risks involved in venture financing and the structure of the contracts.
  • Carry out the valuation of the venture.
  • Understand different options of exiting from the venture.

 

FIN 4328: Risk Management in Financial Institutions 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Analyze the unique structure of financial institutions and threats to the system
  • Describe, understand, and apply contemporary financial measures of risk management and performance.
  • Evaluate the economic environment and the impact of regulatory policies on consumers and financial institutions.
  • Evaluate the various markets for securities (including money markets, bond markets, mortgage markets, foreign exchange markets, derivative markets) and its role in financial markets.
  • Define recent trends in the industry and causes of financial crises.
  • Develop interpersonal skills such as communication and presentation skills.
  • Challenge students to think critically and solve real-world problems to facilitate the acquisition of lifelong learning skills.

 

FIN 6215: Corporate Financial Management

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Explain the fundamental concepts and theories in corporate finance.
  • Analyze corporate performance with financial analysis.
  • Compute firm value using different valuation methods.
  • Demonstrate the concept of risk and return tradeoff in different assets.
  • Compute the appropriate discount rate for assets and cost of capital for a firm.
  • Compute capital budgeting for capital investment decisions.
  • Analyze how corporate financial decisions (such as financing policy, capital structure, dividend, etc.) influence firm value. 
  • Integrate analysis and valuation with applications of different corporate financial management problems.

FIN 6305: New Venture Financing

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Analyze the unique structure of venture capital industry
  • Compare and contrast different forms of financing available to entrepreneurs.
  • Understand the unique risks involved in venture financing and the structure of the contracts.
  • Evaluate the real-option approach to valuation.
  • Carry out the valuation of the venture.
  • Understand different options of exiting from the venture.
  • Challenge students to think critically and solve real-world problems to facilitate the acquisition of lifelong learning skills.

 

FIN 6310: Seminar in Security Analysis and Portfolio Management 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Define the major asset classes, various financial securities and features of those securities
  • Explain how financial securities are traded
  • Calculate and compare various measures of risk and return
  • Describe the key theories and concepts related to investment portfolios
  • Calculate bond values and yields and explain various bond investment strategies
  • Calculate equity values using alternative valuation models
  • Use information technology tools to analyze financial securities and build investment portfolios
  • Create and present an investment recommendation report within a team setting

 

FIN 6315: Seminar in Options and Futures

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Define derivatives and explain the characteristics of derivatives markets, the pricing of derivatives using no-arbitrage, and uses of derivatives.
  • Define forward contracts, describe the pricing and valuation of forward contracts, and explain the characteristics and institutional features of forward markets.
  • Define futures contracts, describe the pricing and valuation of futures contracts, and explain the characteristics and institutional features of futures markets.
  • Define call and put options and explain the characteristics and institutional features of options markets.
  • Calculate the option price by using the Binomial model and the Black-Scholes-Merton model.
  • Explain the trading, hedging, and risk management applications of forward, futures, and options.
  • Describe the characteristics of other derivatives such as swaps.
  • Explain the valuation and risk management applications of swap contracts.
  • Integrate derivatives with applications of financial innovation, financial engineering, trading strategies, and decision making.

 

FIN 6320: Studies in Financial Markets

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Describe, explain, and use contemporary financial measures of risk management and performance.
  • Interpret the role and determinants of interest rates and interaction of interest rates with money supply as controlled by the Federal Reserve System.
  • Assess the economic environment and the impact of regulatory policies on consumers and financial institutions.
  • Assess the various markets for securities (including money markets, bond markets, mortgage markets, foreign exchange markets, derivative markets) and its role in financial markets.
  • Discuss recent trends in the industry and causes of the recent financial crisis.
  • Assess the various theoretical concepts underlying money and capital markets.

 

FIN 6325: Financial Management of Banking Institutions 

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Discuss the regulatory structure within which banks operate.
  • Identify and describe the role of banks within financial markets.
  • Discuss recent trends in the industry and causes of the recent financial crisis.
  • Define the CAMELS rating system used by the Federal Reserve to monitor banks.
  • Define and discuss the Asset / Liability management practices used by modern banks.
  • Define and discuss the liquidity management practices used by modern banks.
  • Estimate the risk weighted assets and Tier One capital ratio of an example bank.

FIN 6375: International Financial Management

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

 

  • Identify the determinants of currency prices and explain how these prices change in the foreign exchange (FX) markets.
  • Distinguish how various exchange rate systems affect currency prices in the FX markets.
  • Explain how a country’s balance of payments affects currency prices in the FX markets.
  • Explain international parity conditions which link the prices of goods, interest rates, spot rates and forward rates throughout the world.
  • Explain the nature and source of exchange rate exposure.
  • Given a firm’s nature of business and operating environment, evaluate the level of exchange rate exposure that firm may have.
  • Explain how exchange rate exposure may create risks and opportunities for domestic and multinational firms.
  • Explain ways in which national international political and economic events impact exchange rate exposure for domestic and multinational corporations.
  • Compare and contrast the basic characteristics of various financial instruments in the currency markets (e.g. forward contracts, futures contracts, options, and swaps) and explain how these instruments may be used to earn speculative profits, or hedge against exchange rate exposure.
  • Explain various strategies a firm may use to manage exchange rate exposure.