Top NavTop NavTop Nav

University Hill plans for winter quarter

university-hill.gif

Renovations are in progress at University Hill, which will soon feature logos and letters of CSUEB clubs and organizations.

  • January 27, 2009

Renovations of the Hayward campus hill where fraternities, sororities and campus clubs have traditionally displayed their letters and logos is underway to create a cleaner image and make the area more accessible.
 
In addition to the facelift, the site also has undergone a name change. The area formerly known as Greek Hill will be called University Hill, said Ric Williams, assistant director of facilities management. The University Hill transformation will continue during the winter quarter as student organizations prepare to paint their spaces on the hill in the coming weeks.

“University Hill will give a sense of entry into the campus,” Williams said. “Warren Hall has served as a beacon, and we are looking for other ways to create identity and a strong feeling of where we are.”

The plan features 16 recycled wood 15-by-30-foot frames filled with concrete set into the hill in two rows. Student organizations will place their symbols, logos or letters in the designated areas.

Student organizations planning to paint their logos on the hill will receive written guidelines to help maintain a unified look. CSUEB Management Intern John Lane will work with students during the design phase.

The 13 student organizations that were previously represented on University Hill, including cultural clubs and Greek organizations, will receive first priority for a new spot on the hill. The remaining slots will go into a lottery system for other clubs interested in making their mark on University Hill, Lane said.

After the logos are painted in winter, Williams wants to plant native grasses and wildflowers on the hill that will bloom in spring. Plans also call for centering a large oak tree at the top of the hill, similar to the Coast Live Oak that is prominently shown on the university seal. CSUEB letters placed flat against the hill and illuminated by solar powered lighting are under consideration for the final design, Lane added.

The university’s letters will bring a sense of visual harmony to the hill, Williams said. Not everyone identified with the Greek system that once dominated the look of the hilltop.

Student groups’ work on the hill will be evaluated annually. In addition, a future policy may be implemented that would allow for turnover every three years for representation of new organizations.


© California State University, East Bay. All Rights Reserved.