CSUEB Timeline of Diversity and Social Justice in Historical Context

Author: Colleen Fong (Ethnic Studies)

Consultants: Duke Austin, Eileen Barrett, Lil Brown-Parker, Luz Calvo, Ann Fajilan, Kyzyl Fenno-Smith, Terry Jones, Rita Liberti, Bob Mahoney, George Miller, Lettie Ramirez, MarjorieRhodes-Ousley, Jodi Servatius, Emily Stoper, Alice Sunshine, Valerie Taniguchi, Sarah Taylor, Authurlene Towner, Jessica Weiss, Rose Wong, and Gale Young.

CSUEB and Hayward events are in bold and have the year underlined to distinguish them from landmark events that have shaped our society and impacted our students.

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Pre 1900
YearDescription

1837

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU): Cheyney University in Pennsylvania founded as the first HBCU after originally being established as the Institute for Colored Youth with the “primary responsibility to educate freed slaves to read and write.” HBCUs, which are private institutions, have provided generations of African Americans opportunities to higher education during a time when public colleges and universities expanded with funding from public taxes and land grants but denied Blacks admission. HBCU alumni include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Thurgood Marshall, Martin Luther King, Jr., Toni Morrison, and Spike Lee. Currently HBCUs “offer African American students a place to earn a sense of identity, heritage, and community” often lacking at other institutions of higher education.

1848

Treaty of Guadalupe Hildago cedes California to United States, Hispanic Reading Room, Library of Congress.

1848

California goldrush ‘begins’; indigenous genocide escalates.

1850

California Statehood, “California Admission Day September 9, 1850.”

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=23856

1860

Braille Introduced in the US

1863

Emancipation Proclamation issued

1865

June 19th Juneteenth News of the Emancipation Proclamation reaches African Americans in Texas, “What is Juneteenth?,” Henry Louis Gates.

1865

Pio Pico elected (the last) governor of Mexican California. Pico was mixed race, of Spanish, Indian and African ancestry. See Pio Pico: The Last Governor of Mexican Californiawith the University of Oklahoma Press (2010) by Carlos Salomon, Department of Ethnic Studies.

1869

Women vote in the territory of Wyoming, “Wyoming: The Equality State,” The Autry Museum.

1875

“While most California communities had admitted African American students into integrated schools by this time, schools in San Francisco ended segregation officially in 1875.” Bancroft Library, UC Berkeley

1882

Chinese Exclusion Act signed

1894

National Deaf-Mute College becomes Gallaudet College

1896

Plessy v Ferguson: The U.S. Supreme Court rules racially segregated facilities are legal as long as they are equal; thus “separate but equal”
1900 - 1949
YearDescription

1910-1940

Angel Island Detention of Chinese immigrants

1911

California women win right to vote

1924

Immigration and Nationality Act: “The Immigration Act of 1924 limited the number of immigrants allowed entry into the United States through a national origins quota. The quota provided immigration visas to two percent of the total number of people of each nationality in the United States as of the 1890 national census. It completely excluded immigrants from Asia.”

1942

More than 110,000 Japanese Americans living on the West Coast are interned because the government considers them “a threat to national security” under Executive Order 9066 issued by President Roosevelt after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii in December 1941. Two-thirds of internees are U.S. born/U.S. citizens; the one-third who are not citizens are prohibited by law from becoming naturalized because they are not “White.”

1942-45

Indigenous Unungan from Alaska’s Aleutian chain are taken from their villages and interned in Southeast Alaskan canneries because of potential Japanese invasion.

1944

The GI Bill was implemented. Formally known as the Serviceman’s Readjustment Act, this program provided veterans “education and training, loan guaranty for homes, farms or businesses, and unemployment pay. Before the war, college and homeownership were, for the most part, unreachable dreams for the average American. Thanks to the GI Bill, millions who would have flooded the job market instead opted for education. In the peak year of 1947, Veterans accounted for 49 percent of college admissions. By the time the original GI Bill ended on July 25, 1956, 7.8 million of 16 million World War II Veterans had participated in an education or training program. Millions also took advantage of the GI Bill’s home loan guaranty. From 1944 to 1952, VA backed nearly 2.4 million home loans for World War II Veterans.”

The above description from the Veteran’s Administration government website makes no mention of the fact that Whites disproportionately benefitted. For brief and readable articles written by White men about the White privilege they benefit from see:

  1. Paul Kivel’s “White Benefits? A Personal Assessment,” in Uprooting Racism, 3rd edition, pp. 34-42.
  2. Larry Adelman’s The Houses that Racism Built: Affirmative Action for Whites”
  3. Ariel Luc’s spoken word video is about how the Homestead Act benefitted his family. Available in the CSUEB Library.

1948

Perez v Lippold – The California Supreme Court strikes down the state’s anti-miscegenation law which prohibits marriages between “a white person with a Negro, mulatto, Mongolian or member of the Malay race." The court deems the law is unconstitutional on religious grounds, because it is denying two Roman Catholics—one White and one Black--the holy sacrament of marriage, rather than arguing the case on racial grounds. Roger J. Traynor, Perez v. Sharp 32 Cal.2d 711 (1948), p. 712.
1950 - 1959
YearDescription
1954

Brown v Board of Education: U.S. Supreme Court rules racial segregation of children in public schools violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, ending “separate but equal”.

1957

CSUEB founded as The State College for Alameda County. In 1959 the college opens and 300 students start class.

1959 Alaska and Hawaii become states – both have populations with high proportions of peoples of color
1960

The birth control pill is made available in the United States after clinical trials on Puerto Rican women who suffered from severe side effects.

1960

The California Master Plan for Higher Education outlined California’s three-tiered public education system and how the community colleges, CSUs and UCs could work in concert to provide public education for “California legal residents” in the interest of a “successful democracy.” Starting at a California community college, a student could complete his/her first two years of general education and then transfer to a CSU or UC to obtain a Bachelor’s degree. The Master Plan reaffirmed that the CSU and the UC would continue to be “tuition free,” that students would not be charged for any direct teaching expenses but could be charged “fees” for “services not directly related to instruction” (p. 174).

California Community Colleges did not charge fees until fiscal year 1984-85 when a $5 per unit fee was implemented.

1960 - 1969
YearDescription

1960-61

The first edition of the College Catalogue that is available in the CSUEB Library. The Catalogue provides insight into the contemporaneous Diversity and Social Justice issues of the time. Thus it serves as a baseline for this timeline, keeping in mind that changes are implemented long before showing up in the Catalogue:

Curriculum: The College offers a Bachelor’s degree in the following seven disciplines: Biology, Business Administration, Elementary Education, Language Arts, Mathematics, Physical Science, and Social Science, p. 11.

“Financial Aids” are limited to the National Defense Education Act (NDEA) loan program, p. 20. The NDEA (1958) “provided funding to improve American schools and to promote postsecondary education. The goal of the legislation was to enable the country’s educational system to meet the demands posed by national security needs. Of particular concern was bolstering the United States’ ability to compete with the Soviet Union in the areas of science and technology.

The NDEA stands as a major act of reform. It marked the beginning of large-scale involvement of the U.S. federal government in education.” See Encyclopedia Britannica.

Student Organizations: Membership in student organizations is based on criteria “without regard for race, color, religion or national ancestry,” p. 20.

“Counseling” is limited to academic counseling (p. 20) but in the following year it is expanded to include assistance with “personal adjustment” and “professional advice on questions of a non-academic nature”, 1961-62 Catalogue, p. 23.

1961

President John F. Kennedy issues Executive Order 10925 stipulating government contractors "take affirmative action to ensure that applicants are employed, and employees are treated during employment, without regard to their race, creed, color, or national origin." UC Irvine Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity.

1961-62

The College Catalogue lists courses in area studies including Mexico, Latin America, Asia and Africa in departments like Geography and Anthropology. Area studies programs are different than "ethnic studies." The development of area studies is tied to the U.S. government's post-World War II Cold War agenda to stop the spread of communism whereas ethnic studies originated in student protests against a racially biased education that excluded peoples of color. It was first established as a "School of Ethnic Studies," one of the demands students made in their successful strike at San Francisco State (1968-69). "Campus Commemorates 1968 Student-Led Strike," 9/22/2008, SF State News and "Third World Liberation Front: Notice of Demands".

1962-63

A new program in Spanish and Spanish Literature is launched with a focus on Spain. A new course titled Sociology 4100 “Minority Groups,” is also offered. 1962-63 Catalogue, p. 96.

1963

The State College for Alameda County moves to the current location, with the address 25800 Hillary Street, Hayward.

1964-65

The university’s name is changed to “California State College at Hayward.” The College Catalogue discusses “Financial Aids” which include “scholarships” based on “financial need” and also “loans.” p. 40-41.

1965

Amendments to the Immigration and Nationality Act end the discriminatory national origins quota system and establish an immigration system based on family reunification and U.S. workforce needs. The amendments also set hemispheric limits and a 20,000 annual ceiling per nation that Eastern hemisphere nations are subjected to immediately.

1965

The Higher Education Act (HEA) signed into law “to strengthen the educational resources of our colleges and universities and to provide financial assistance for students in postsecondary and higher education” (Pub. L. No. 89-329). The HEA created grants, loans, and programs known today as the Federal TRIO Programs like EXCEL to assist low-income and first-generation college students and students with disabilities graduate. President Reagan vowed to cut TRIO funding by 50% each of his years in office save for his final year. In 1996 Newt Gingrich’s Contract with America threatened total elimination of TRIO but the Council for Opportunity in Education successfully lobbied to save the program and convince Republican legislators of the importance of TRIO’s mission. “The Development of EXCEL at CSUEB” by Bob Mahoney, who directed the program from 1980-2006.

1965

President Lyndon B. Johnson issues Executive Order 11246 which prohibits “employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, and national origin by those organizations receiving federal contracts and subcontracts” and in 1967 adds “sex.” EO 11246 also requires federal contractors to take “affirmative action” in hiring. UC Irvine Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity

1965

The first battered women’s shelter in California opens, Haven House in Pasadena. California enacts SB 91 (Presley), the Domestic Violence Center Act, which provided shelters for local battered women with funds from marriage license fees. (Welfare & Institutions Code 18290-18307) (1977). SafeState.org - Preventing Crime and Violence in California California Attorney General's Crime and Violence Prevention Center

1965-66

Two new courses are offered: Anthropology 3500, “Native American Indians” and Anthropology 3505, “Indians of California,” 1965-66 Catalogue, p. 180

1966-67

“Student Health” is listed for the first time in the Catalogue, p. 39.

1968

Third World Student Strike for a Black-controlled Black Studies Department at San Francisco State College.

1968-69

Several new courses are offered: Teacher Education 4390, “Teaching the Culturally Different,” College Catalogue, p. 185; Anthropology 3460, “Culture and Personality”; 3520, “Peoples of the Pacific Islanders”; 4500, “The American Southwest,” 1968-69 Catalogue, pp. 185, 161 and 163.

1969

As a result of the student strike, the San Francisco State College administration authorizes the establishment of a Third World College; it includes Black, Chicano/a, Asian American, and Native American Studies.

1969-1970

Two new courses are offered: Sociology 3415, “Sociology of the Afro-American Family,” Teacher Education 4390, “Poverty and Learning,” 1969-70 Catalogue, pp. 286, 213

1969-70

A new center is founded: “The Inter-Cultural Relations Center provides supplemental services in the areas of recruitment, counseling, advising, housing, tutoring, employment, orientation and financial aid advising for economically and educationally disadvantaged students. It participates in the Special Admissions Program and seeks to develop a college community atmosphere that will complement the college program in meeting the needs of students, especially in providing opportunities for academic and personal growth.” 1969-70 Catalogue, p. 23.

1970 - 1979
YearDescription

1970-71

Two new centers are founded: Asian-American and Mexican-American:

“The Asian-American Cultural Center coordinates the curriculum related to the Asian-American with library resources and with community resources. Students who desire to do research in the Asian –American community in connection with their courses are directed to the Center. The Center also has the information on current curriculum developments related to the Asian-American.” 1970-71 Catalogue, p. 29.

“The Centro de la Raza identifies potential Mexican-American students, facilitates their entrance into the College, and assists them in successfully completing college. Supplemental services are offered in the form of recruitment, orientation, pre-registration advising, counseling and advising, and tutoring. Students who have a financial disability or who may not meet regular admission requirements but can offer evidence of their ability to achieve satisfactorily at the college level are invited to make inquiries about the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) or the Special Admissions Program.” 1970-71 Catalogue, p. 29.

1970-71

Two new Bachelor degree programs are founded: “Black Studies” and “Mexican-American Studies,” 1970-71 Catalogue, pp. 142, 79, and 263.

1971-72

Associated Students establishes a child care center off campus with a capacity of 40 children: “[State Licensed] Child Care Center: Child care is available to students, faculty, and staff for pre-school children aged 2 years, 6 months to 5 years, 9 months . . . open 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. every school day. It is located at 27287 Patrick Avenue. The fee for students is $7.00 per week up to 25 hours and $14.00 per week for 26-50 hours. Faculty and staff fees are $12.00 per week up to 25 hours, and $24.00 per week for 26-50 hours.” 1970-71 Catalogue, p. 27.

1971-72

“Ethnic Studies” appears for the first time in “Undergraduate Graduation Requirements” as a “recommendation”: “Because of the importance of ethnic cultures in the United States, the University recommends that every student take at least one course dealing with this area.” 1971-72 Catalogue, p. 74.
This statement appears through the 1980-81 Catalogue and then was replaced with the Cultural Groups and Women graduation requirement in the 1981-82 Catalogue.

Ca. 1972

Black Graduation Celebration established

1972

Black Faculty and Staff Association established. Terry Jones reports that this association had its origins in a handful of Black faculty meeting informally at a coffee shop in Hayward and evolving into the current organization that established an annual fundraising dinner where scholarships are distributed.

“There were various versions of the BSFA. Here’s one. . . [Professors] Leroy Chauffe [Chemistry], Charlie Harper [Physics] and Jonathan Staggers [Kinesiology] were meeting at that coffee shop on Mission, it’s now an Asian buffet. They were meeting just to get together and then they started to meet at Jonathan’s home in Hayward on Fridays. With family and living in El Cerrito and everything it was hard for me to get to those meetings at the end of the week but this was the loosely organized group that formed the beginnings of what we have today. Sometimes Malachi Andrews [Kinesiology] would come and Mack Lovett [Assistant VP for Instructional Services]. . . White folk say Black faculty on campus don’t have a presence on campus but what they don’t understand is that they stay away from campus because they have never been made to feel welcome here. They have the feeling of not belonging.” Terry Jones interview with Rose Wong and Colleen Fong 7/31/2014, used with permission.

1972

First Annual Pilipino Culture Night performances

1972

Title IX of the Education Amendments “protects people from discrimination based on sex in education programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance.

1972-73

A new “concentration” in “Asian-American Studies” and a new course Sociology 4525, “Asian Identity in America,” are offered. 1972-73 Catalogue, pp. 88 and 96. They are distinct from “Asian Studies,” which has long been a part of the college (since 1961-62) along with other area studies such as Latin American Studies. Beginning in 1976-77, “Asian American Studies” is no longer listed in the Catalogue.

1973

Roe v Wade legalizes first trimester abortion based on a woman’s right to privacy. “The Supreme Court: Expanding Civil Rights,”

1973-74

A new center is founded. “A Handicapped Student Center . . . serves to facilitate all services to the handicapped. . . . All handicapped students are urged to visit the Center for information on: vocational and rehabilitation counseling, Veterans Administration rehabilitation counseling, special wheel-chair maps, assistance with parking, registration, test taking, reading, etc.” 1973-74 Catalogue, p. 27.

1973-74

“Asian-American Cultural Center” and “The Centro de la Raza” are no longer listed. These two centers were first listed in 1970-71. 1973-74 Catalogue, pp. 26-27.

1973-74

Proposals for Concentrations in Women’s Studies and Native American Studies are pending, 1973-74 Catalogue, pp. 94 and 95.

1974

Lau v Nichols paves the way for bilingual education based on Section 601 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination based on race, color, or national origin in any program or activity receiving federal funding.

1974-75

The first time the following majors/concentrations are listed in the catalogue: Asian-American Studies, Black Studies, Mexican-American Studies, Native American Studies, Women’s Studies, 1974-75 Catalogue.
Course offering: Elementary Hindi, a three-quarter sequence, 1974-75 Catalogue, p. 299.

1975

Women’s Studies established: Professor Emerita Emily Stoper (Political Science) comments: “The spark plug behind it was an administrator named Joan Seavey Thomas . . . who was dean of women for a while, then ran the reentry women's center . . . I was director of the WOST program from 1979 to 1992. During most of those years, I had a co-director, Elsa Garcia Pandavenes.” Email from Emily Stoper to Colleen Fong 5/28/2014, used with permission.

1976

Publication of Catharine McKinnon’s Sexual Harassment of Working Women: A Case of Sex Discrimination popularizes sexual harassment as a pervasive social problem and an act of discrimination against women.

1976

The 20,000 per-country immigration ceilings imposed by the 1965 amendments to the immigration law are applied to Western-Hemisphere countries thereby reducing the legal immigration slots available to Mexicans by 50%. Given that more than 40,000 Mexicans had been legally immigrating to the U.S. per year, implementing the 20,000 per-country ceiling created the “undocumented problem.” The Tarnished Golden Door: Civil Rights Issues in Immigration (September 1980), A Report of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, p. 12.

1978

Maternity Leave is non-existent. Professor Emerita Emily Stoper (Political Science) comments: “My second child, Jonathan, was born in July [1978]. My memory is that there was NO maternity leave at that time. I tried to time the pregnancy so that he would be bornshortly after the end of the spring quarter in early June. As you can see, I was fairly successful in doing that, so I had 10 weeks at home with him that summer. Then in the fall quarter I took a partial leave without pay so that I could teach only 2 courses - and informally, I stopped working on both governance and scholarship for the rest of that year, which gave me still more time with him. That's how I managed without maternity leave. Of course, it would have been much better to have it. I don't know what I would have done if I didn't have such high fertility, enabling me to time his birth.” Email from Emily Stoper to Colleen Fong 5/28/2014, used with permission.

1978

Chicano/Latino Graduation Celebration established

1978

In Oregon v Rideout, a man faces a trial for raping his wife, which challenges "marital privilege" as a defense against rape. All other states except for Oregon, Delaware and Iowa, followed common law, which defined rape as "the forcible penetration of the body of a woman not the wife of the perpetrator." Oregon v. Rideout - Significance - Rape, Body, Trial, and Police - JRank Articles

1978-79

New minors are available in Native American Studies and Women’s Studies, 1978-79 Catalogue.

Ca. 1980

Chicano Latino Staff and Faculty Association established

Ca. 1980

Asian American Educators Council (AAEC) established; co-chaired by Valerie Nii (now Taniguchi) of EXCEL and Judy Sakaki of EOP. AAEC collected student signatures to justify hiring a professor to teach Asian American courses.

1980-81

A “Nature and Purposes” section of the Catalogue is first published and includes a description of the students as “diverse.” “The San Francisco Bay Area is ethnically and economically diverse and this is reflected in the Hayward student body. Approximately one-third of the enrollment consists of students from minority groups and slightly more than half the students are women. The majority of Hayward students are employed . . . the average age is 27 . . . [and] access for the disabled is particularly well-developed at CSUH. The academic program at Hayward is designed to serve and benefit from this diversity of student backgrounds and interests and it has a strong regional flavor.” 1980-81 Catalogue, pp. 22-23.

“Nature and Purposes” is included in the 1981-82 and 1982-83 Catalogues and then in 1983-84, the Catalogue publishes the first Mission Statement, a lengthy full-page, which precedes “Nature and Purposes,” 1983-84 Catalogue, pp. 22-23.

1981

“On June 5, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC) publish a Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), describing cases of a rare lung infection, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), in five young, previously healthy, gay men in Los Angeles. All the men have other unusual infections as well, indicating that their immune systems are not working . . . By year-end, there is a cumulative total of 270 reported cases of severe immune deficiency among gay men, and 121 of those individuals have died.”

1981-82

Cultural Groups and Women Graduation Requirement: “A minimum of 3 quarter-units of coursework applicable to the General Education-Breadth Requirements must recognize the contributions to knowledge and civilization that have been made by members of various cultural groups and by women.” 1981-82 Catalogue, p. 614

1982

Equal Rights Amendment (for women) to the Constitution fails ratification

1982

CSU Faculty unionize. California Faculty Association (CFA) becomes the bargaining representative for CSU faculty after a number of organizations attempt to unionize in different parts of the state in the 1970s and 1980s.

1983-84

First “Campus Mission” statement. The main part of the Mission statement is “Instruction is the primary mission of the campus; its aim is to prepare students for intelligent citizenship, for advanced study, and for entry or advancement in a profession or occupation” although it includes a description the University’s “service area” as “ethnically and racially diverse.” The Campus Mission is followed by “Nature and Purposes,” previously discussed, 1983-84 Catalogue. pp. 22-23

1983-84

The Ethnic Studies Department is established from combining existing Departments and Concentrations: American Indian Studies, Afro-American Studies, and La Raza Studies. A Bachelors degree program is offered as well as minors and options. Asian American Studies is not included. Terry Jones wrote the proposal for an Ethnic Studies Department and the first year faculty included Jones and Michael Clark (Black Studies), Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz (Native American Studies), and Tony Ochoa and Juan Gonzales (Chicano Studies). Lecturers hired for the department that year include Noel Samaroo, Barbara Paige, and Colleen Fong (Ethnic Studies).

1970 - 1979
YearDescription

1983-84

The GE graduation requirement “Cultural Groups and Women” is implemented; the requirement was soon expanded to include Gay Lesbian Bisexual and Transgender (GLBT).

1983-84

A Women’s Studies Certificate Program is established. Professors Emily Stoper and Elsa Garcia are co-directors.

1983-84

Gale Auletta (now Young), Communication and Michael Clark, Chair Ethnic Studies (1984-85) and Barbara Paige-Pointer (1985/86-1987) co-direct CSU Chancellor’s Grant “Toward a Cross Cultural Curriculum” Project. Many of the Social Science and Humanities departments paired up with an Ethnic Studies faculty and created a manual and set of syllabi for integrating multicultural perspectives into general education courses.

October 1989: First Conference
October 1991: Second Conference

Each produced a publication:
(1) American Behavioral Scientist (1990) Volume 34:2: “The Inclusive University: Multicultural Perspectives in Higher Education.” Editors: Jones, T. and Young, G.
(2) Toward the Multicultural University. (1995) Ed Bowser,B., Jones, T., and Young, G. Praeger Press

1984

California Community Colleges did not charge fees until fiscal year 1984-85 when a $5 per unit fee was implemented.

1986

Center for the Study of Intercultural Relations (CSIR) established. Gale Auletta (now Young) and Terry Jones received and managed grants totaling $338,000. Over a four-year period, CSIR sponsored film series, workshops, and conferences and produced videotapes. The administration used CSIR for PR advantage and lent lots of rhetorical support but refused to give it a line item when Jones and Young wanted to turn over the leadership to Colleen Fong and Benjamin Bowser.

Maternity Leave is nonexistent. Gale Auletta (now Young) was the first CLASS faculty member to have a baby since Professor Emily Stoper had her son in 1978. She comments: “There was no maternity leave-- There were a few other women on campus and we openly talked about trying to arrange conceptions to the academic calendar. I had tried to arrange for a summer baby but that didn’t work out and my due date was late January 1986. Al Smith, then CLASS Dean, said my leave would require taking sick leave, so my doctor needed to write a note for full time sick leave for Winter quarter and reduced time for Spring. The Dean and I worked out the exact dates so as minimize the number of sick days taken but maximize the time off. I continued to co-chair the Cross Cultural Curriculum grant even though the Provost had recommended that the grant be suspended. The Dean supported the grant going forward. Barbara Paige (Ethnic Studies lecturer) took over a lot of the day-to-day work for Winter. Nan Maxwell from Business arrived on campus in Sept 1986 in new tenure track position -- she was nine months pregnant, had her baby and kept on teaching. Ahh, it all seemed so normal.” Email from Gale Young to Colleen Fong 5/28/2014, used with permission.

Colleen Fong comments on the lack of Maternity Leave when she had her son in January as a term-by-term part-time lecturer. “Even if there had been maternity leave I doubt if I would have qualified for it as a-term-by-term part time lecturer. I did not qualify for health insurance or guarantee of work the following quarter. In winter term when I had my baby I was simply unemployed. I remember being ecstatic that he arrived one week earlier than his due date because this meant I would get to spend an ‘extra’ week with him—totaling nine full weeks--before returning to teaching in the spring. The standard return-to-work-date-after-giving-birth was six weeks. When I told one of my teaching colleagues this she said this was absolutely pitiful. She asked me, “If you had a heart attack instead of a baby, do you think they would expect you to return to work after an arbitrary period of time? This society just doesn’t value children and mothers!”

1986

Immigration Reform and Control Act provides legalization for approximately 2.7 million undocumented immigrants who can provide the documents required to apply under this Act and establishes sanctions for employers who knowingly hire an undocumented immigrant.

1986

“On September 17, President Ronald Reagan mentions AIDS publicly for the first time, vowing in a letter to Congress to make AIDS a priority.” By the end of 1987 nearly 48,000 in the U.S. had died of AIDS.

1986-87

The first Asian American Studies course taught in the Department of Ethnic Studies appears in the Catalogue: Ethnic Studies 1500, “Asian American Experience.” (during this period new courses were offered as “Directed Group Studies (DGS) before being formalized as regular courses).

1989

The California Master Plan for Higher Education is reviewed with an eye on “bring[ing] education into the lives of more Californians who are poor, non-white, disabled, on the margins.” The Report further states: “All segments of public education . . . shall have as a primary and essential mission guaranteeing the access and ensuring the success of currently underrepresented minority peoples in California.”

“California Faces, California’s Future: Education for Citizenship in a Multicultural Democracy, A Report of the California Legislature Joint Committee of the Review of the Master Plan for Higher Education,” pp. 13-14. http://www.cpec.ca.gov/CompleteReports/ExternalDocuments/CALIFORNIA_FUTURE.pdf

1990 - 1999
YearDescription

1990s

The Department of Speech Communication established an interdisciplinary option in Intercultural Communication.

1990

Americans with Disabilities Act “prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, State and local government, public accommodations, commercial facilities, transportation, and telecommunications. It also applies to the United States Congress.”

1990; 1992

California passes SB 2184 (Royce) of 1990 and SB 1342 (Royce) of 1992, establishing the crime of stalking in California. California was the first state in the nation to establish this crime. (1990, 1992) SafeState.org - Preventing Crime and Violence in California, California Attorney General's Crime and Violence Prevention Center

1990

The Immigration Act removes homosexuality as a ground for exclusion from immigrating to the United States.

1990

Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA)

The C.E. Smith Museum of Anthropology inventories their collections and distributes inventories to federally recognized tribes but Marjorie Rhodes-Ousley, Associate Director of the museum, reports that there were no requests for the return of sacred objects or objects of cultural patrimony. The way the law read, it was not possible to return any remains because there are no federally recognized tribes represented in the museum’s archaeological collection and the law prohibited the return of any artifacts to the non-federally recognized tribes.

None of the Bay Area Ohlone are Federally Recognized although nine have applied for federal recognition despite the “hundreds of thousands of dollars” required to support an application. Many Ohlone are working to establish a cultural presence in the Bay area completely separate from Federal Recognition.

The medication clozapine is introduced to treat schizophrenia (and some bipolar disorders), which expands the ability for individuals with mental illness to pursue their educational goals. Even though about fifteen antipsychotic drugs were introduced in the U.S. between 1954 and 1975, it wasn’t until 1990 that this new “atypical antipsychotic” drug was made available and considered a major breakthrough.


1990

Norma Rees is hired as the first woman President, after a national search that included CSUH faculty on the search committee.

1990-92

Gale Young serves as Special Assistant to the President. In this role, she established and facilitated monthly meetings of the Multicultural Council for eighteen departments. She also provided assistance to faculty and administrators on multicultural issues.

1993

Guide to the Pronunciation of Asian Pacific Islander Names published as a project of the Asian American Educators’ Council to improve the campus climate, specifically to enable faculty to correctly pronounce students’ names on the first day of class. The Guide was sold in the CSUH bookstore for several years and provided to incoming faculty in the fall.

1993

CSU Parental Leave - Professor Colleen Fong (Ethnic Studies) comments: “I waited more than seven years to have my second child because I knew I just couldn’t manage two kids any sooner. I had colleagues who ‘decided’ not to have children at all or only one child because of the workload. I felt so privileged to be in the tenure-track position rather than a lecturer only to learn that my maternity leave amounted to ten days of full pay! After that I was required to use my sick leave and I would not qualify for state disability until I used all my sick leave. I was furious and consulted a women’s legal aid organization certain that a class action suit was warranted—why did women have to exhaust their sick leave while men could retire with all their sick leave intact? The women at legal aid said this was not discriminatory. I then focused on trying to maximize what few benefits I had. A friend who taught at San Jose State and had a baby the previous year told me to make sure that after my ten days of paid leave, I specify, on a daily basis, that I was taking four hours of sick leave and four hours of leave without pay. She told me if I did not divide up each day in this way my health benefits might be in jeopardy. What I didn’t think about at the time was how I should have solicited sick leave donations from my male colleagues! My son was born in mid-August two weeks before his due date, which meant I could have returned to teaching fall quarter but it was too late since my classes had already been assigned to someone else. I mention this not because I did not enjoy spending four and a half months at home with my baby but because the teaching schedule presents unique work-family issues for faculty women-- you can’t bring in a ‘substitute teacher’ for a few weeks.”

1993

California requires individuals to provide proof of citizenship to apply for a driver’s license. In 2013 Gov. Jerry Brown signs a bill enabling undocumented individuals to apply for driver’s licenses.

1994

The Asian/Pacific Islander Graduation Celebration established

1994-96

New “Campus Mission Statement” replaces the 1983-84 mission and diversity is central. The first line reads: “California State University, Hayward is committed to educational excellence for a diverse society,” 1994-96 Catalogue, p. 13.

The Board of Regents of the University of California ends affirmative action by prohibiting the use of race, religion, sex, color, ethnicity, and national origin in the admissions, hiring, and awarding of contracts.

1995

The Office of Faculty Development is established and provides diversity-related programs.

1995-97

The Annenberg/Corporation for Public Television project “Diversity, Distance, and Dialogue” The grant for $200,000 involves 6 CSU Campuses, each establishing and team teaching a general education course designed to elicit dialogues across differences. Young and Jones are co-investigators and produced a CD and Film distributed by Public Broadcasting System.

1996

Associated Students move the offsite childcare center to the campus with the capacity of 105. The Early Childhood Education Center is funded by Associated Students, state and federal funds.

1996

Cultural Groups and Women Graduation Requirement expanded to include “gays/lesbians”: “A minimum of 3 quarter-units of coursework applicable to the General Education-Breadth Requirements must recognize the contributions to American civilization and knowledge that members of various cultural groups and women have made. . . . Courses satisfying this requirement must focus on African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, gays/lesbians, and/or women in the United States.” 1996-98 Catalogue, p. 90.

1996

California Proposition 209 bans affirmative action. Fifty-four percent of voters approved what was known as the “California Civil Rights Initiative” ensuring in the Constitution “The State shall not discriminate against, or grant preferential treatment to, any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin in the operation of public employment, public education, or public contracting.”

1996

The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act essentially cuts welfare spending significantly and gives states the responsibility for further welfare “reform.” Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

1996

President Clinton signs the Defense of Marriage Act into law defining marriage as a legal union between one man and one woman.

1998

The Faculty Diversity and Equity Committee is established as a sub-committee of the Executive Committee. Gale Young, as Affirmative Action Liaison Officer in 1996-98, brought the initiative forward calling for a Standing Committee. The Senate refused it as a standing committee because they did not want experts from Women Studies and Ethnic Studies to be appointed to the committee while other members were elected.

1998

CA Proposition 227 limits bilingual education to one year if parents do not submit a waiver to the school on an annual basis to enable their children to continue with bilingual education.

2000 - 2009
YearDescription

2000

California enacts AB 2003 (Shelley), which expands the definition of domestic violence to include "dating relationships" and to authorize law enforcement to make an arrest without a warrant. SafeState.org - Preventing Crime and Violence in California, California Attorney General's Crime and Violence Prevention Center

2001

CSU Parental Leave - Professor Jessica Weiss (History) comments: “It was the maternity leave under the . . . Collective Bargaining Agreement, so there were 4 weeks or 20 business days contiguous to birth. Sophie was due in July so that I could not use the official 'leave' [since teaching faculty are on a ten-month contract]. This prompted several suggestions that I wouldn't have leave. I took Fall off and used 1/2 sick leave and was uncompensated for the other half (by choice--I didn't want to burn all my sick leave!). I believe that was [under the] Family Medical Leave Act. It was Fall 2001. Jessica Weiss email to Colleen Fong, 5/15/2014, used with permission.

2001

Sept. 11, 2001 – terrorist attacks; first hate murder committed by White racist Frank Roque who killed Balbir Singh Sodhi in Arizona, a turban-wearing Sikh American whom Roque mistook for “Muslim.”

2001

California (and Texas) allows undocumented students to pay in-state tuition. These Californians are referred to as “AB 540 students.” Nationnal Conferece of State Legislatures

2001

Gwen Araujo murder. Seventeen year-old Araujo is murdered for being a male-to-female transgender woman in Newark, CA.

2003-04

The University Catalogue states: “The diversity of the Bay Area and the state of California is reflected in the makeup of the student population. Over half of Cal State Hayward's students are of African, Asian, Hispanic, or Native American heritage. International students from over 60 countries also study on the campus.” 2003-04 University Catalogue

Excerpt of the University’s Mission Statement: “We welcome the great variety of students on our campuses both as a strength and an opportunity. The university is dedicated to providing an equitable education within a nurturing environment for all its students.”

2004

The Department of Social Work is founded by Terry Jones and Dianne Rush Woods. The department offers a Master of Social Work with a “multicultural focus which prepares social work students to work . . . with diverse multicultural populations. . . “ 2010-2012 Catalogue, p. 606. (Colleagues of Terry Jones honored him and his pro-diversity and social justice achievements at CSUEB in May of 2014 at the time of his retirement. Click to view.)

2004-2007

Diversity Council for an Inclusive CSUEB (DCI) established from “existing campus groups-- the Feminist Faculty Union, Black Faculty & Staff Association, Asian/Pacific Islander Faculty and Staff Association, Chicano/Latino Staff and Faculty Association . . . [it] formed to become a voice for women, gay, lesbian, and faculty and staff of color in a proactive way.” One of DCIs projects was to send Kindness postcards to every faculty and staff on campus featuring Maya Angelou’s quote, “. . . people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” The DCI does not receive formal university recognition and members chip in to design and pay for the website.

2005-2006

A New Mission Statement along with Values and Vision Statements replace the 1994-96 Campus Mission Statement.

Mission: “To provide an academically rich, multicultural learning experience that prepares all its students to realize their goals, pursue meaningful lifework, and to be socially responsible contributors to their communities, locally and globally.” 2005-06 University Catalogue

Values: “We value critical and creative thinking, effective communication, ethical decision-making, and multi-cultural competence.” 2005-06 University Catalogue

Vision: “We strive to be known for . . . An inclusive campus community where students, faculty, and staff from vastly different backgrounds collaborate--creating and sustaining a vibrant learning community.” 2005-06 University Catalogue

2005

“Super Sunday” is established as part of the CSU African American initiative where CSU faculty visit Black churches to inform congregations about how to enroll in local CSUs.

http://www.calstate.edu/supersunday/

2005

Formation of the Feminist Faculty Union (FFU) “In early 2005 I met with two of my favorite feminist friends on campus, Eileen Barrett (English) and Jen Eagan (Philosophy) to discuss a concern I had about the representation of faculty who identified as feminists on various Senate committees. We quickly agreed that it was time for feminist faculty to join together in semi-formal meetings to mentor each other, strategize around campus issues of interest to us as feminists, socialize, etc. Jen named the group the FFU (Feminist Faculty Union), which we thought an excellent title for our collective. The FFU was born - and has not looked back.

Over the course of April and May of that year we met twice with a handful of feminist faculty on campus to get a sense of what we all wanted from the organization. It was decided at the May meeting to host a Fall quarter gathering - opening up the meeting to as many women as possible. The enthusiasm at the meeting was pretty exciting. Over 30 women attended a meeting in the Biella Room of the Library to discuss action strategies moving forward over the school year - with getting feminists elected to various Senate standing committees at the top of our "to-do" list. In addition the meeting was a great way for faculty to connect with each other across the entire university as all four colleges and the library were represented.” Rita Liberti email to Colleen Fong, 8/11/2014, used with permission.

2005

Faculty Diversity and Equity Committee completes its “Diversity Climate Study” which surveyed 264 out of 290 part- and full-time faculty members. Although the “Overall CSUEB Environment Mean scores indicate that respondents feel that CSUEB is generally welcoming” findings reveal disparities based on race, gender, ability and sexual orientation: “Faculty respondents generally agree that CSUEB is welcoming to male faculty (78% ‘strongly’ or ‘moderately agree’), followed by white faculty (77.4%), female faculty (67.7%), and faculty of color (66.6%). . . . Over fifty percent of respondents report that CSUEB is not welcoming for faculty members who have a disability, or are lesbian, gay, or bisexual.” (p. 2)

2005

Hurricane Katrina “In late August, Hurricane Katrina ravaged the Gulf Coast. As a result, 20,000 African-American college students in New Orleans suddenly had nowhere to attend classes. About half of these black students were enrolled at the three historically black universities in the city. . . . After Katrina caused widespread destruction on the Gulf Coast and flooded much of the city of New Orleans, it quickly became evident that most of the people remaining in the city were black. Many of these African Americans were from low-income neighborhoods. Many had no cars, no money, and no friends out of town to whom they could turn. It was five days before significant federal or state help arrived for the tens of thousands of blacks who were marooned in the city. A number of African-American political leaders charged that the response would have been far quicker had the victims been in the predominantly white cities of Palm Beach or Boca Raton.” The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education 2005 http://www.jbhe.com/features/49_hurrican_katrina.html

2005

African American Staff and Faculty Association members mentor the 66 Hurricane Katrina students enrolled at the university. "We want to pledge our support to you Katrina scholars for as long as you are in the Bay Area," Terry Jones, president of the association, told students who attended an Oct. 21 reception. "You are a part of us, and we take that very seriously. We want to hold out our hand to you and show you our love."

http://www.csueastbay.edu/news/category-pages/archive-pre-2009/the-view/top-stories/article-17.html

2005

Angels in America, opens CSUEB Theater Season. Set in 1986 during the height of the HIV/AIDS crisis, Director Marc Jacobs, says “it mixes realism with high comedy as it presents the America of the Reagan era as a nation at a political, spiritual and sexual crossroads . . . He describes [the play] as ‘a meditation on what it means to live and die and be connected.’"

2006

Mohammad Qayoumi hired as first Afghan American President after a national search that included CSUEB faculty on the search committee

2006

First Campus Climate Study conducted on all faculty, staff and students (as a part of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) re-accreditation process.)

2006

Asian Pacific Islander American Annual Scholarship Program established by the Asian Pacific Islander Faculty and Staff Association (APIFSA), formerly the Asian American Educators’ Council, based on the applicant’s likelihood of serving APIA communities after graduation.

2006-08

A New Mission Statement along with Values and Vision Statements replace the 1994-96 Campus Mission Statement.

Mission: “To provide an academically rich, multicultural learning experience that prepares all its students to realize their goals, pursue meaningful lifework, and to be socially responsible contributors to their communities, locally and globally.”

Values: Include “an academic environment that is inclusive and student-centered” and “multi-cultural competence.”

Vision: “An inclusive campus community where students, faculty, and staff from vastly different backgrounds collaborate—creating and sustaining a vibrant learning community.” 2006-08 Catalogue, p. 8.

2008

Associated Students Incorporated (ASI) Diversity Center established after student protest; Director Jonathan Stoll hired.

2008

EdD program established in the Department of Educational Leadership, College of Education and Allied Studies, titled “Education Leadership for Social Justice” and the first students enroll in summer.

2008-09

“Remembering 1882: Fighting for Civil Rights in the Shadow of the Chinese Exclusion Act”: a CLASS program in collaboration with the Chinese Historical Society of America (San Francisco) bringing together faculty, librarians, and students for multiple programs and exhibits.

2009

African American Oscar Grant, age 22, is murdered by a BART officer at the Fruitvale station in Oakland. Grant was a resident of Hayward.

2009

California apologizes to its Chinese American population for its history of racist laws. “The laws, some of which were not repealed until the 1940s, barred Chinese from owning land or property, marrying whites, working in the public sector and testifying against whites in court.” Time Magazine,

2009

CSU Faculty Agree to two-day per month furloughs to avoid layoffs in the midst of an unprecedented budget crisis. Furloughs begin August 1st. “California Faculty Association Ratifies Furlough Agreement”

March 4: Students organize a “walk out to speak out” to protest budget cuts. Over 1000 students gather at Agora Stage and then march to Warren Hall, the administration building.

May 4: 100 students stage a “limpia” (spiritual cleansing) of Warren Hall, the then administration building.

2010 - Present
YearDescription

2010

Diversity Day established on campus: In opening comments, Dianne Rush-Woods, chair of the Academic Senate issues a challenge “to keep pushing. Embrace diversity. Let’s look for stimulus money and research grants. Let’s incorporate diversity and social justice in everything we do.”

2010

Dream Activists bring their stories to campus sharing with students, faculty and connecting with fellow dreamers.

2010

Yuri Kochiyama receives honorary doctorate: “Yuri Kochiyama, a human rights activist dedicated to social justice through her participation in America’s civil rights movements for more than 50 years” is presented with an honorary doctor of humane letters degree at CSUEB CLASS commencement ceremonies. “Kochiyama spent two years in a Japanese American internment camp in Arkansas during World War II. . . . Her activism began in Harlem, NY, in the early 1960s when she participated in the Asian American, Black and Third World empowerment movements that promoted civil and human rights, called for creation of ethnic studies academic programs, and protested the war in Vietnam . . . Kochiyama . . . is forever immortalized in a Life magazine photo that shows her holding [Malcolm X] in her arms as he lay dying” after being shot in 1965 while giving a speech.

2010

Two graduates of the first cohort of Educational Leadership for Social Justice doctoral students participate in Black graduation. Where according to the graduates, “We were treated like rock stars!”

2010

Hayward is the second most diverse city in California: “Devised by USA Today in 1991, it [the Diversity Index] calculates the probability that two people randomly selected from a place are of a different race or ethnicity.” Hayward is second to Carson, a suburb in Los Angeles County. Pittsburg, San Pablo, Richmond, East Palo Alto and Suisun City also make the top 10 most diverse of California cities. Close behind are Vallejo, Oakland and San Leandro, along with many of the East Bay's unincorporated areas.

In a Hayward census tract just north of West Tennyson Road, the one that calculates as California's most diverse, a resident has an 89 percent chance of running into a neighbor who is of a different race or ethnicity.” “East Bay tops among California's most diverse places” by Eric Kurhi and Matt O'Brien, Contra Costa Times 3/18/2011.

Oakland-Fremont-Hayward (CA) is the third most diverse area in the nation
Population: 2.5 million
Diversity index: 79

Oakland was originally inhabited by the Huchiun tribe, but later the Spanish settled in the area. Today, the population is nearly 23 percent Hispanic or Latino, more than 20 percent Asian and more than 11 percent African-American. The city has a Chinatown neighborhood, which is actually a diverse pan-Asian area, including Chinese, Koreans and Filipinos. There are celebrations for the Chinese New Year, Dragon Boat Races, Chinatown street festival and Vietnamese Mid-Autumn or Moon festival.” ‘The Top 10 Most Diverse Cities in America” by Cindy Perman 17 May 2011, CNBC.

2010

The Theater/Dance Department opens the season with “The Laramie Project,” on the reactions to gay student Matthew Shepard’s murder in 1998 while he was attending the University of Wyoming in Laramie. Chair of the Department Thomas Hird, promises the show “provides a stark testimony to our nation’s moral conscience” and Director Ann Fajilan “hopes that audiences will be inspired to recognize human injustices.”

2011

April 14, Students and Faculty organize “People’s University” on the lawn in front of the bookstore, with teach-ins on diverse topics related to budget cuts, neo-liberal austerity measures, and diversity issues. Students lead march to President Quayoumi’s office, where they decided to “sit in” to demonstrate their disgust with budget cuts and tuition increases.

2011

CSUEB receives a US Department of Education grant for the Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institution Program (AANAPISI Program) to establish programs to provide educational support for historically underserved Asian and Pacific Islander American students. Co-PIs Meiling Wu, Kim Geron, and Evaon Wong-Kim along with the Academic Support programs at Cal State East Bay establish Student Service Operation for Success (SSOS) to support students. The program is expected to last four years.

2011

The campus childcare center closes. The Early Childhood Education Center lost $136,000 in 2009-09 and $170,000 in 2009-10. The projected loss for 2010-11 is between $200,000-240,000. At time of closing 2 faculty/staff and 8 students had children at the Center. “Closure of the Early Childhood Education Center Effective August 19th, 2011,” memo signed by Randy Saffold, Executive Director, Associated Students, Inc., CSUEB

2011

“CSUEB in the Top 100 for Degrees Awarded to Students of Color”

2011

Striking faculty shut down the campus; Cornell West, activist and Princeton Professor of the Center for African American Studies, joins the picket line.

Starting at dawn, faculty begin picketing the entrances to campus to protest the cancellation of raises guaranteed by their contract (while student tuition continues to rise) and publicize the connection between faculty working conditions and student learning conditions. K-12 teachers join the protest as well as California Faculty Association members and students from other CSU campuses in Northern California. Teamsters unions honored the picket line halting deliveries to campus. Luz Calvo comments on the one-day strike:

“On November 18th, 2011, faculty in the California Faculty Association went on a one day strike. On that day, Cal State Dominguez Hills also went on strike. The statewide plan was to do a series of rolling strikes throughout the system and our campus went first. In the early morning hours, faculty set up picket lines at both entrances to campus (Carlos Bee and Harder Rd.). Incoming traffic came to a standstill as long lines started forming. Faculty picket captains allowed only one car at a time to enter. Most of the cars contained administrators or staff who had to work that day because their own union contracts precluded them from honoring our picket line. Few students and fewer faculty choose to cross the picket line. During the day, parking lots were largely empty and the campus felt like a ghost town. Our strike effectively closed down the campus. Many students joined the picket line, as did faculty from SFSU, San Jose, and other nearby campuses. At noon, strikers completely closed down the main entrance to campus with a prearranged "flash mob" dance performance and rally. That entrance remained closed for the rest of the day. Because Cornell West was due to speak that evening, strike leaders had decided early on to end the strike at 6PM so that we could proceed en masse to hear West's talk. Strike leaders also invited West to join them on the picket line, which he did at 5PM. In his public talk, West expressed his support for the striking faculty.” Luz Calvo email to Colleen Fong, 8/11/2014, used with permission.

2011

An All-Campus Diversity Survey was conducted by the Faculty Learning Community for Diversity, Multicultural Learning, and Social Justice led by Faculty-in-Residence Dianne Rush Woods, with participants Ann Fajilan, Margaret Harris, Silvina Ituarte, Derek Jackson Kimball, Nidhi Mahendra, Marie Mallare, Monique Manopoulos, Julia McGurk, and Sarah Taylor, completed an All-Campus Diversity Survey. The survey received 1,142 responses from students, faculty, and staff. The responses to the open-ended survey questions about students’ experiences of feeling respected and disrespected in class indicated a need for additional training in DSJ-oriented teaching among CSUEB faculty.

2011

AB 540 college students (undocumented students) may apply for state financial aid and grants

2011

Supreme Court rejects a challenge to California's policy of granting reduced, in-state tuition at its colleges and universities to graduates of its high schools who are undocumented immigrants. The justices refused to hear his appeal in the case of Martinez vs. Board of Regents of the University of California.

2012

Through Professor Terry Jones (Social Work) CSUEB begins a partnership with the Richmond Community Foundation’s annual Summit on Children and Youth with a focus on young men of color and educational access and success

2012

Leroy Morishita appointed interim President by Chancellor of the CSU; 2013 appointed President by CSU Chancellor

2012

A New Mission Statement adopted along with Shared Strategic Commitments and Institutional Learning Outcomes
Mission: “Cal State East Bay welcomes and supports a diverse student body with academically rich, culturally relevant, learning experiences that prepare students to apply their education to meaningful lifework, and to be socially responsible contributors to society. Through its educational programs and activities, the University strives to meet the educational needs and to contribute to the vitality of the East Bay, the state, the nation, and global communities.”

Eight Shared Strategic Commitments, the second of which is:
“Enhance our inclusive campus, responding to the backgrounds and interests of our diverse community and promoting their academic, professional and personal development.”

Six Institutional Learning Outcomes, the third of which is “Diversity: Apply knowledge of diversity and multicultural competencies to promote equity and social justice in our communities.” 2012-13 Catalogue, p. 80

2012

A CSU student is paying three times more for tuition/fees (approximately $6000 per year) than a 1992 CSU student. The average CSU student leaves school approximately $15,000 in debt.

2012

PEIL funded project focuses on recruitment and retention of Latino/a transfer students and the Diversity and Social Justice Institutional Learning Objective. In 2013-14, the university launches the GANAS program with 35 mostly Latino/a transfer students.

2012

California Community Colleges increase their fees to $46 per unit; prior to 1984 these colleges were fee-free.

2013

Ethnic Studies online major established in an attempt to provide greater access to all students.

2013

Parental Leave for Faculty: “The current Collective Bargaining Agreement is 6 weeks contiguous to birth or as much as 70% reduced schedule for the quarter. With Asher, who was born last fall, there was some push and pull as to whether the 70% was for the quarter or had to also be within the 75 days contiguous to birth. The CO thought contiguous to birth but Human Resources and I both read it as the whole quarter--so that's what I did. . . And after the parental leave is drained, there's 12 weeks [unpaid leave from the] Family Medical Leave Act.” Jessica Weiss

2013

Aramark workers on campus unionize. CSUEB is the last of the twenty-three CSU campuses to unionize food service workers.

2013

University Diversity Office established. Dr. Dianne Woods appointed first Chief Diversity Officer for the campus.

2013

The California Dream Act allows undocumented students to apply for state financial aid.

2013

Gov. Jerry Brown signs a law permitting undocumented immigrants to obtain drivers licenses starting no later than Jan 2015.

2013

The Defense of Marriage Act or DOMA (which defines marriage as between one man and one woman) ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court

2013

Same-sex marriage legalized in California following the Supreme Court’s ruling that the supporters of Proposition 8 did not have standing in court. The State of California had refused to appear in court to defend Proposition 8. Thus, the District court’s ruling, which declared Proposition 8 unconstitutional, was upheld.

2013

Four White San Jose State University students accused of hate crimes against their African American roommate. CSUEB hosts a vigil to reflect on, and speak out against, hate crimes. The Academic Senate submits a Resolution Against Hate Crimes at San Jose State University.

2014

The California Supreme Court grants a law license to undocumented immigrant, Sergio Garcia, who was brought to the U.S. by his parents when he was 17 months old and passed the California bar exam in 2009.

2014

Terry Jones publishes a letter to the editor in The Pioneer on the “illusion of inclusion” on campus as he reflects on Black History month

2014

Academic Senate votes to place Faculty Diversity Equity Committee (FDEC) as a standing committee of the Academic Senate on the ballot but the status of FDEC is still in question.

2014

Eileen Barret and Luz Calvo propose a 10 point plan to create a campus culture free from harassment, bullying and discrimination. They present their plan to ExCom, the Senate, and various campus constituencies.

2014

U.S. Department of Education starts a Title IX compliance investigation of fifty-five colleges, including UC Berkeley, over handling of sexual violence complaints. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in all education programs or activities that receive federal financial assistance.

2014

Elliot Rodger, a Santa Barbara City College student, kills six and then himself in the UC Santa Barbara student community of Isla Vista, CA. His Youtube videos and writings are highly misogynistic and racist.

2014

Diversity and Social Justice Programs ranked low in the Planning for Distinction (PFD) Report. For example, the minor in American Sign Language is scored “4” which is in the “bottom 10%.” How can a DSJ program such as this be ranked so low given the stated purpose of PFD was “a comprehensive review of all campus programs and activities.” In addition, “the objective of this planning effort was to maintain the hallmarks of quality at CSU East Bay and to pursue initiatives the campus believes are most essential to the campus mission and strategic commitments, and the institutional learning objectives?”

2014

The Black Faculty and Staff Association has distributed more than $170,000 in scholarships and has a number of faculty/staff who have pledged to fund one of the ten annual $1200 scholarships on an annual basis.

2014

CSUEB designated a Hispanic Serving Institution by the Federal Government.

2014

Women’s Studies online major established

2014

The Feminist Faculty Union (FFU) celebrates the end of the academic year in June at Cosecha Café in Oakland. Rita Liberti, one of the founding members, comments: “In the nearly 10 years since its formation the FFU has met on countless occasions, sometimes in small groups of less than 1/2 dozen and other times in larger settings.FFU activity continues through to the present as our Fall quarter meeting will focus on issues of sexual harassment and discrimination on our campus. The FFU grew out of a frustration with the status quo on campus - our work continues nearly 10 years later...” Rita Liberti email to Colleen Fong 8/11/2014, used with permission.

2014

Yuri Kochiyama, longtime civil rights activist who received an honorary doctorate at the 2010 CSUEB CLASS commencement, dies in Berkeley at age 93.

2014

Maya Angelou, activist, dancer, writer and professor of American Studies at Wake Forest University dies at age 86. Among her writings is the one quoted by the CSUEB Diversity Council in 2007 and distributed campus-wide: “. . . people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

2014

According to campus facilities there are now thirteen gender-neutral bathrooms on the Hayward campus.

2014

Forty-second Annual Pilipino Culture Night performances (This has been an annual event since 1972.)

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