Juries, Recitals and Exams

Undergraduate Instrumental / Vocal Juries

Relevant to: All Music majors in the B.A. program taking applied lessons in an instrument or voice


Students enrolled in instrumental or vocal Applied Lessons perform a Progress or Advancement Jury each semester.

There are two types of Juries - Progress Juries and Advancement Juries. Progress Juries typically include the performance of 2-3 selections and scales (refer to your area's specific jury requirements below). Advancement Juries typically include the performance of multiple selections, the number determined by area, and may also require demonstration of level specific skills such as scales, musicianship exams, sight-reading, etc. Scroll down to Jury Requirements by Area for specific requirements.

Degree Recital Juries are considered Advancement Juries. Junior Recital Juries serve as the Advancement Jury from Level 3 to Level 4, pending completion of the Junior Recital. Senior Recital Juries serve as a program culmination, pending completion of the Senior Recital.

For information on the printed / digital recital programs required for Junior and Senior Recital Juries, visit the Music Resource Center homepage.

Current Students: Please read the entire document at the link below

arrow

Fall 2021 Recital and Jury Policy

 

Fall 2021 Junior and Senior Recitalists: Fill out this form by September 24

arrow

Fall 2021 Recital Scheduling Form

Students are evaluated on multiple benchmarks for each level.
  • Needs major support (0): Student is not ready for University Level Study.
  • Emerging (1)
  • Developing (2)
  • Proficient (3): Student is ready to prepare a Junior Recital
  • Exemplary (4): Student is ready to prepare a Senior Recital

Jury Scores

There are 3 potential scores for each jury:
  • Pass: The performance clearly demonstrates benchmarks for advancement to the next level at this time (Advancement Jury) or show progress indicating they will be able to demonstrate them at the end of the next semester (Progress Jury).
  • Fail: The performance does not demonstrate required benchmarks. The student is given a warning in a Progress Jury or is retained at the current level of Applied Study in an Advancement Jury. The student is expected to perform an Advancement Jury at the end of the next term.
  • Discontinue: The performance does not demonstrate required benchmarks and the lack of progress indicates that the student would likely not be able to meet the benchmarks at the next jury. A student who is discontinued may not register for Applied Study. The student may work privately and will be given the opportunity to perform another Jury at the end of the next semester.

NOTE: Jury outcomes do not necessarily correspond to academic grade for the semester.

Jury Outcomes

  • A Progress Jury performance that demonstrates mastery of skills with a majority of scores at or above the Benchmarks of the current level will be considered a Pass.
  • An Advancement Jury performance that demonstrates mastery of skills with a majority of scores at or above the Benchmarks of the desired new level will be considered a Pass.
  • A Jury performance that demonstrates mastery of skills with a majority of scores below the Benchmarks of the current level will be considered a Fail.
  • Faculty may Discontinue any student whose Jury performance fails to demonstrate progress towards the next level.

Jury Requirements by Area

Woodwinds / Brass

Progress Jury - Level 1
  • Prepare all major scales with flats (C, F, Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Cb), one chromatic scale, and perform two scales of your choice.
  • Perform two contrasting pieces by different composers, which have never been performed for a jury. One selection may be an etude.
  • The pieces must total 3-5 minutes of music.
 Advancement Jury to Level 2
  • Prepare all major scales with flats (C, F, Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Cb) and all major scales with sharps (G, D, A, E, B, F#, C#), one chromatic scale, and perform a few chosen by the faculty jury.
  • Perform three contrasting pieces by different composers, which have never been performed for a jury. Two substantial movements from a longer piece can be substituted but a third selection by a different composer is required.
Progress Jury - Level 2
  • Prepare all major scales with flats (C, F, Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Cb), all major scales with sharps (G, D, A, E, B, F#, C#), and all natural, melodic and harmonic minor scales, one chromatic scale, and perform a few chosen by the faculty jury.
  • Perform two contrasting pieces by different composers, which have never been performed for a jury. One selection may be an etude.
  • The pieces must total 3-5 minutes of music.
 Advancement Jury to Level 3
  • Prepare all major scales with flats (C, F, Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Cb), all major scales with sharps (G, D, A, E, B, F#, C#), and all natural, melodic and harmonic minor scales, all augmented and diminished scales, one chromatic scale, and perform a few chosen by the faculty jury.
  • Perform four contrasting pieces by different composers, which have never been performed for a jury. Two or three substantial movements from a longer piece can be substituted but one more selection by a different composer is required.
 Progress Jury - Level 3
  • Prepare and perform either an orchestral excerpt OR an etude/technique piece by memory.
  • Perform two contrasting pieces by different composers, or two substantial movements from the same work, which have never been performed for a jury.
  • The pieces must total 5-7 minutes of music.
 Junior Recital (Advancement to Level 4)
  • Perform three to five pieces, for a minimum of twenty-five (25) minutes of music.
  • One piece must be a multi-movement piece.
  • Pieces should represent a variety of composers, eras and styles.
  • Pieces should be accompanied by a pianist (maximum of one unaccompanied piece unless approved by the applied instructor)
 Progress Jury - Level 4
  • Prepare and perform either an orchestral excerpt OR an etude/technique piece by memory.
  • Perform two contrasting pieces by different composers, or two substantial movements from the same work, which have never been performed for a jury.
  • The pieces must total 5-7 minutes of music.
 Senior Recital
  • Perform four to six pieces, totaling between thirty (30) and forty-five (45) minutes of music.
  • Two pieces should be multi-movement pieces.
  • At least one piece must be a chamber piece (duet, trio, quartet, or quintet, etc with other performers)
  • Pieces should represent a variety of composers, eras and styles.
  • Pieces should be accompanied by a pianist (maximum of one unaccompanied piece, unless approved by the applied instructor)

PLEASE NOTE: accompanists are not required for progress juries but are required for recital juries.

Percussion

Progress Jury - Level 1

  • Prepare rudiments and rolls on Snare Drum (review Whaley, Musical Studies for the Intermediate Snare Drummer, p. 20 and on)
  • Prepare rolls, tuning, and dynamics on Timpani
  • Prepare all major scales and perform two chosen by the faculty jury on Mallets. 
  • Perform a Mallet solo from Whaley, primary handbook 
  • Perform sight reading on Snare Drum, Mallets and Timpani
  • All pieces should have never been performed for a jury.

Advancement Jury to Level 2

  • Perform one Snare drum study such as Cirone, Portraits in Rhythm #3 
  • Perform one Timpani piece such as Goodman Modern Method for Timpani #27
  • Perform one Mallet study such as Whaley Primary Handbook for Mallets #21
  • Prepare all major scales with flats (C, F, Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Cb) and all major scales with sharps (G, D, A, E, B, F#, C#) and perform two scales with flats and two scales with sharps of your choice.
  • All pieces should have never been performed for a jury.

Progress Jury - Level 2

  • Perform one Snare Drum piece from Cirone, Portraits in Rhythm 
  • Perform one Timpani piece such as Goodman Modern Method for Timpani #27
  • Prepare all minor scales on mallets and perform two chosen by the faculty jury
  • Perform one Mallet study such as Whaley Primary Handbook for Mallets #21
  • All pieces should have never been performed for a jury.

Advancement Jury to Level 3

  • Perform one multiple percussion piece (such as Bruce Smith: Five One) 
  • Perform one beginning four mallet study (from Mark Ford Marimba Technique Through Music: Oakland)
  • Perform one piece on Vibraphone (such as Friedman Vibraphone Technique #11)
  • Perform one Timpani piece (such as Goodman #72)
  • Prepare to perform sight reading on Snare Drum, Mallets and Timpani
  • All pieces should have never been performed for a jury.

Progress Jury - Level 3

  • Prepare two orchestral excerpts and perform two chosen by the faculty jury (for example: Timpani: Excerpts from Beethoven Sym. # 5, 7, 9, Mallets: Gershwin Porgy and Bess, and Snare: Rimsky Korsakov Scheherezade)
  • Perform one Snare Drum piece OR one Multiple Percussion piece
  • Perform a four mallet solo on Marimba or Vibraphone by memory
  • Perform a Timpani solo (such as Peters, Carroll, etc)
  • All pieces should have never been performed for a jury.

Junior Recital (Advancement to Level 4)

  • Perform three to five pieces, for a minimum of twenty-five (25) minutes of music.
  • One piece must be a multi-movement piece.
  • Pieces should represent a variety of composers, eras and styles.
  • At least one piece should be with another musician(s)
    • Perform a Multiple Percussion solo
    • Perform a Timpani solo (such as Beck Sonata)
    • Perform a Mallet solo (such as Bach Prelude from Cello Suite #1)

Progress Jury - Level 4

  • Perform three contrasting pieces by different composers, which have never been performed for a jury. These pieces can be selected from the Senior Recital. 
  • The pieces must total 5-7 minutes of music.

Senior Recital

  • Perform four to six pieces, totaling between thirty (30) and forty-five (45) minutes of music.
  • Two pieces should be multi-movement pieces.
  • At least one piece must be a chamber piece (duet, trio, quartet, or quintet, etc with other performers)
  • Pieces should represent a variety of composers, eras and styles.
  • Perform at least one Multiple Percussion solo (such as Hollinden: Cold Pressed)
  • Perform at least one Mallet solo (such as Rosauro: Concerto for Marimba)
  • Perform at least one Timpani solo (such as Carter, Kirk Gay)

PLEASE NOTE: accompanists are not required for progress juries but are required for recital juries.

Strings

Progress Jury - Level 1

  • Prepare all major scales with sharps and their arpeggios (C, G, D, A, E, B, F#, C#) and perform two scales/arpeggios chosen by the faculty jury. 
  • Perform two contrasting pieces by different composers, which have never been performed for a jury. One selection may be an etude.
  • The pieces must total 3-5 minutes of music.

Advancement Jury to Level 2

  • Prepare all major scales with sharps and their arpeggios (C, G, D, A, E, B, F#, C#) and all major scales with flats and their arpeggios (F, Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Cb) and perform two scales/arpeggios chosen by the faculty jury.
  • Perform three contrasting pieces by different composers, which have never been performed for a jury. Two substantial movements from a longer piece can be substituted but a third selection by a different composer is required.

Progress Jury - Level 2

  • Prepare all major scales with sharps and their arpeggios (C, G, D, A, E, B, F#, C#) and all major scales with flats and their arpeggios (F, Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Cb) and all natural, melodic and harmonic minor scales with their arpeggios, and perform two scales/arpeggios chosen by the faculty jury.
  • Perform two contrasting pieces by different composers, which have never been performed for a jury. One selection may be an etude.
  • The pieces must total 3-5 minutes of music.

Advancement Jury to Level 3

  • Prepare all major scales with sharps and their arpeggios (C, G, D, A, E, B, F#, C#) and all major scales with flats and their arpeggios (F, Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Cb) and all natural, melodic and harmonic minor scales with their arpeggios, and perform one major scale/arpeggio with flats, one major scale/arpeggio with sharps, one natural minor, one melodic minor and one harmonic minor scale/arpeggio, one augmented scale/arpeggio and one diminished scale/arpeggio of your choice.
  • Perform four contrasting pieces by different composers, which have never been performed for a jury. Two or three substantial movements from a longer piece can be substituted but one more selection by a different composer is required.

Progress Jury - Level 3

  • Prepare two orchestral excerpts by memory and perform one chosen by the faculty jury OR prepare two etudes/technique pieces by memory and perform one chosen by the faculty jury.
  • Perform two contrasting pieces by different composers, or two substantial movements from the same work, which have never been performed for a jury. The pieces must total 5-7 minutes of music.

Junior Recital (Advancement to Level 4)

  • Perform three to five pieces, for a minimum of twenty-five (25) minutes of music.
  • One piece must be a multi-movement piece.
  • Pieces should represent a variety of composers, eras and styles.
  • Pieces should be accompanied by a pianist (maximum of one unaccompanied piece unless approved by the applied instructor)

Progress Jury - Level 4

  • Prepare two orchestral excerpts by memory and perform one chosen by the faculty jury OR prepare two etudes/technique pieces by memory and perform one chosen by the faculty jury.
  • Perform two contrasting pieces by different composers, or two substantial movements from the same work, which have never been performed for a jury. The pieces must total 5-7 minutes of music.

Senior Recital

  • Perform four to six pieces, totaling between thirty (30) and forty-five (45) minutes of music.
  • Two pieces should be multi-movement pieces.
  • At least one piece must be a chamber piece (duet, trio, quartet, or quintet with other performers)
  • Pieces should represent a variety of composers, eras and styles.
  • Pieces should be accompanied by a pianist (maximum of one unaccompanied piece, unless approved by the applied instructor)

PLEASE NOTE: accompanists are not required for progress juries but are required for recital juries.

Guitar

Progress Jury - Level 1

  • Perform two contrasting pieces by different composers, which have never been performed for a jury. One selection may be an etude.
  • The pieces must total 3-5 minutes of music.

Advancement Jury to Level 2

  • Perform three contrasting pieces by at least three different composers, which have never been performed for a jury. Two substantial movements from a longer piece can be substituted but a third selection by a different composer is required.

Progress Jury - Level 2

  • Perform three contrasting pieces by different composers, which have never been performed for a jury. One selection may be an etude.
  • The pieces must total 5-7 minutes of music.

Advancement Jury to Level 3

  • Perform four contrasting pieces by different composers, which have never been performed for a jury. Two or three substantial movements from a longer piece can be substituted but one more selection by a different composer is required.
  • The pieces must total 7-10 minutes of music.

Progress Jury - Level 3

  • Perform two to three contrasting pieces by different composers, or two substantial movements from the same work, which have never been performed for a jury. The pieces must total 7-10 minutes of music.

Junior Recital (Advancement to Level 4)

  • Perform four to five pieces, for a minimum of twenty-five (25) minutes of music.
  • One piece must be a multi-movement piece.
  • Pieces should represent a variety of composers, eras and styles.

Progress Jury - Level 4

  • Perform two contrasting pieces by different composers, or two substantial movements from the same work, which have never been performed for a jury. The pieces must total 10-12 minutes of music.

Senior Recital

  • Perform four to six pieces, totaling between thirty (30) and forty-five (45) minutes of music.
  • Two pieces should be multi-movement pieces.
  • At least one piece must be a chamber piece (duet, trio, quartet, or quintet with other performers)
  • Pieces should represent a variety of composers, eras and styles.

Voice

Progress Juries

  • Students will prepare two (2) selections which have never been performed for a jury and the faculty will choose to hear one of them. 

Jury to Level 2

  • Three (3) memorized selections, which have never been performed for a jury.
  • One of the three selections must be in a language other than English.
  • One selection must be self-learned and assigned by the instructor.

Jury to Level 3

  • Four (4) memorized selections, which have never been performed for a jury.
  • Two of the selections must be in a language other than English.
  • Two style periods should be represented (Baroque, Classical, Romantic or Contemporary (20th and 21st Century)).
  • One selection must be an aria.
  • One selection must be self-learned and assigned by the instructor.
  • A Musicianship Exam must be passed before the completion of the 2nd semester of study at Level 2. The Exam is typically administered at the end of the first semester of study at Level 2.

Junior Recital Jury (to level 4)

  • Six (6) memorized selections, minimum (25 minutes max).
  • Three different languages must be represented.
  • Three style periods should be represented (Baroque, Classical, Romantic or Contemporary (20th and 21st Century)).
  • One selection must be an aria.

Senior Recital Jury

  • Eight (8) memorized selections, minimum (50 minutes max).
  • Four different languages must be represented.
  • Ideally, all style periods should be represented (Baroque, Classical, Romantic or Contemporary (20th and 21st Century)).
  • One selection must be an advanced aria.

Piano

Progress Juries

  • Three (3) selections from three different composers for a total of 15 minutes
  • Individual movements are permissible, but a student may not repeat the same selections on consecutive juries (fall/spring)
  • Memorization guidelines follow Advancement Jury procedures below

Jury to Level 2

  • A Minimum of three (3) selections from three style periods
  • Must include at least one contrapuntal Baroque piece (Invention, Sinfonia)
  • Minimum of one piece must be memorized

Jury to Level 3:

  • A minimum of three (3) selections from three style periods
  • Must include a contrapuntal Baroque piece
  • Must include a sonata-allegro movement of a Classical sonata
  • Minimum of two pieces must be memorized

Junior Recital Jury (to level 4)

  • Four (4) style periods should be represented (Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Contemporary — 20th/21st century)
  • Must include at least two movements (fast/slow) of a Classical sonata
  • A minimum of three pieces must be memorized

Senior Recital Jury

  • Four selections from four style periods
  • Baroque selection must be a WTC Prelude and Fugue or four movements of a suite (Allemande, Courante, Sarabande, Gigue)
  • Must include a complete Classical Sonata (all movements)
  • All pieces must be memorized with exceptions for complex 20th/21st repertoire

Jazz

Progress Juries, All Levels.  Instructor will decide on tunes that are appropriate to student’s level and skill.

  • Perform two (2) scales, chosen by the faculty jury, from the list of scales appropriate to the student’s level. 
  • Prepare a transcription unaccompanied.
  • Students will prepare two (2) selections which have never been performed for a jury.  Play melody and solo over form.  Drums do the same, and trade fours.

Advancement Jury to Level 2:

  • Perform two (2) scales, chosen by the faculty jury, from the list of scales appropriate to the student’s level. Drummers play styles and various tempos. Must include trading fours.
  • One (1) transcription played with recording
  • About 3-5 minutes of music.  Play melody and improvise on a Great American Songbook standard or a Jazz Standard.  Drummers will play melody and improvise over form.

Advancement Jury to Level 3:

  • Perform two (2) scales, chosen by the faculty jury, from the list of scales appropriate to the student’s level.
  • One (1) transcription played with recording
  • Two (2) contrasting pieces or movements of about 4-5 minutes each.  Play melody and improvise on a Great American Songbook standard and a Jazz Standard.  Drummers will play melody and improvise over form on two contrasting tunes and styles.

Junior Recital Jury (to level 4) / Senior Recital Jury:

Junior Recital Requirements

Students will play 5 tunes.  All tunes must be memorized. All tunes should be arranged with at least intros, outros, and endings.  The following are strict guidelines:

  • A bop style tune with ‘difficult’ melody such as Donna Lee, Anthropology, Conception.  Drummers play melody on set and trade 4s with band.
  • Either Moments Notice or Giant Steps by John Coltrane.  Drummers solo over form.
  • A standard commiserate with a college level junior.  Drummers- this tune should be a latin song, with solo intro either in or out of time, but leading the band in without a count off.
  • A standard arranged in an odd time.
  • An original tune

Senior Recital Requirements

Students will play 7 tunes.  All tunes must be memorized.  All tunes should be arranged with at least intros, outros, and endings. The following are strict guidelines:

  • A boppish tune with ‘difficult’ melody such as Donna Lee, Anthropology, Conception.  Student may not play the same tune as level 3 recital.  Drummers play melody on set and trade 4s with band.
  • Either Giant Steps, 26-2, or Countdown, by John Coltrane.  Drummers solo over form.
  • Two standards commensurate with a college level senior.  One of these standards is to be a latin tune. Drummers have at least one very up tune and one latin tune.
  • A standard arranged in an odd time.
  • An original tune
  • Student’s choice

Generally what we’re looking for:

  • Nice tone characteristic of jazz, modeled after the great musicians in jazz history.
  • Strong time and feel.  Use of accents and ghosting to create a strong swing feel.
  • A nice balance of language, scales, and transcription ideas to hit the chord changes and harmony.  Playing changes means within the notes you select the harmony is clear.  

Note:  Make a distinction between improvisation, which is making up whatever you want, and jazz improvisation, which is speaking a language with the appropriate accent, which is called swing, and using words and phrases recognized as jazz.  

M.A. Progress Jury

Each semester, M.A. students taking instrumental or voice applied lessons are required to present a minimum of ten minutes of music from at least two contrasting works, which have not yet been performed on a jury. Jury pieces should be selected in consultation with applied faculty and should demonstrate progress made this semester. Instrumental and vocal juries will be evaluated by a panel of two or three faculty members, including the applied faculty member and two full-time faculty members.

Evaluation criteria for M.A. Juries (instrumental and vocal)

Students and applied faculty should consult the B.A. jury rubrics, especially the “Exemplary” column (grade of 4). Jury performances must, at minimum, be at the Exemplary level or higher, showing musical and technical maturity beyond the undergraduate level.

Jury Rubrics by Area

Needs Major Support (0)
Emerging (1)
Developing (2)
Proficient (3) Junior Recital Ready
Exemplary (4) Senior Recital Ready

TECHNIQUE

Physical

Posture/Embouchure
Holds instrument incorrectly, has postural problems. Embouchure is inconsistent and problematic.
Holds instrument correctly but has alignment issues. Embouchure is inconsistent.
Performer demonstrates aligned posture some of the time and correct embouchure. Sometimes demonstrates control of instrument.
Performer mostly demonstrates aligned posture and correct embouchure. Maintains control of instrument.
Performer demonstrates perfectly aligned posture and correct embouchure. Maintains control of instrument.
Breathing
Performer does not demonstrate evidence of proper breathing technique.
Performer is able to recognize, articulate, and demonstrate proper breathing but lacks enough consistency to play through several phrases with adequate breath support.
Breath support is sometimes strong but is developing. Intonation and tone are often affected.
Almost always consistent breath support. Intonation and tone are rarely affected.
Strong and consistent breath support throughout.

Sound

Tone quality
Performer does not demonstrate a characteristic tone on instrument.
Underdeveloped tone lacks focus and clarity. Vibrato (if appropriate) is lacking
Tone is developing. Fuzziness, lack of clarity sometimes evident, especially in range and dynamic extremes. Vibrato (if appropriate) is underdeveloped.
Tone is well developed but occasionally lacks clarity/resonance. Vibrato (if appropriate) is evident, but needs refinement.
Tone is mature, resonant, and beautiful, with vibrato (if appropriate).
Intonation
Intonation is poor. Poor breath support adversely affects intonation
Notes that are in a comfortable range are in tune. Extended ranges, fast passages, and awkward leaps are out of tune.
Most notes are played in tune but some obvious intonation issues occur. Performer recognizes out of tune notes and strives to fix problematic passages.
Overall intonation is good; minor issues occur and performer demonstrates ability to adjust pitch.
Outstanding intonation in all registers and volumes.
Technical facility
Performance is severely underprepared. Technical flaws are prevalent and prevent getting through the performance. Performer has to restart several sections due to errors.
Performance is underprepared. Technical flaws hinder performance. Performer has to restart due to errors.
Performance is somewhat prepared. Technical facility is inconsistent but developing.
Performance shows adequate preparation. Technical facility is very good, with minor flaws during difficult passages.
Performance is extremely well prepared. Technical facility is fluid.
Articulation
No difference in articulations are noted for the most part. Performer does not demonstrate understanding of the technique.
Insecure attacks are predominant and interfere with the flow of the music. Markings are sometimes executed accurately enough but performer lacks understanding of the technique.
Many attacks are insecure, causing several markings to be executed inaccurately. Lack of technique or tongue interferes with effectiveness of music. Student is able to handle most articulations, but execution within the context of this music is weak.
Attacks are usually secure, though isolated errors or lapses occur. Markings are usually executed accurately as indicated in the score. Some fluency in technique may be lacking in a few small passages. Articulation serves to bring music alive most of the time.
Secure and appropriately nuanced attacks. Markings are executed accurately as indicated in the score. Passages are technically fluid/fluent and confident. Articulation serves to bring music alive.

MUSICAL PREPARATION

Note Accuracy
Note errors interfere with musical flow. Performer must restart due to errors.
Note errors are evident but the overall performance remains somewhat effective.
Minor note errors during difficult passages do not detract from overall performance.
Music is played with 100% pitch accuracy.
Music is played with 100% pitch accuracy.
Rhythmic Accuracy
Rhythm errors interfere with musical flow. Performer must restart due to errors.
Rhythm errors are evident but the overall performance remains somewhat effective.
Rhythm errors during difficult passages do not detract from overall performance.
Music is played with 100% rhythmic accuracy.
Music is played with 100% rhythmic accuracy.
Dynamics
There are no dynamics in the performance.
Changes in dynamics (loud and soft) are apparent.
There are gradations of dynamics that correspond to where the composer has indicated. Louds and softs are clears, as are crescendos and diminuendos.
The majority of the written dynamics are performed with an emotional component attached.
All written dynamics are represented and the performer has considered other dynamic possibilities.
Phrasing
There are random breaths throughout the music. Very little evidence of phrasing consideration.
The performer often places a breath in an inappropriate location. Performer’s sense of phrasing needs further development. Very little attention is paid to the musical line.
The performer mostly breathes in logical places. Phrasing is evident, but musical line lacks definition, nuance and/or fluidity.
The performer breathes in logical places. There is expressive shaping and contouring of phrases with some minor flaws.
The performer's breaths are barely noticeable. The performer demonstrates a mature sense of phrasing and musicianship.
Expression
The performer demonstrates no expression.
The performer demonstrates occasional expression but these seem forced and unnatural.
The performance is somewhat expressive, but often sound is harsh/distorted during passages with dynamic/range extremes and in general lies within a narrow dynamic range.
The performance is expressive most of the time, but sometimes sound is harsh/distorted during passages with dynamic/range extremes.
The performance is highly expressive. The performer portrays the essence of the music in a natural and effective manner.
Interpretation/Tempo
Performer lacks a fundamental understanding of the music. Tempo choices are not stylistically appropriate, and tempo is not consistent.
Performer lacks understanding of the music. Tempo choices are not often appropriate, and tempo is often inconsistent.
Performer’s musical interpretation is developing. Tempo choices are often appropriate, though tempo is sometimes inconsistent.
Performer displays a good understanding of the music and a clear sense of musical interpretation. Tempo choices are generally appropriate, and tempo is generally consistent.
Performer displays a deep understanding of the music to render an emotive musical interpretation. Tempo choices are appropriate, and tempo is always consistent.

Other

Accompaniment
Performer demonstrates no evidence of having practiced with accompanist and cannot get through performance due to errors.
Performer has difficulty playing with accompanist and needs to start over due to errors.
Performer can play with accompanist but has issues staying together. Communication is developing.
Performer plays well with accompanist but has a few minor instances where they are not together. Communication is evident.
Performer plays extremely well with accompanist. Communication and cohesion are evident and result in a successful performance.
Professional Disposition
Is not prepared, has not followed the established rules for jury preparation and performance. Reacts negatively to constructive criticism. Presents themselves as disheveled.
Professional demeanor is lacking in several ways (dress, action, verbal interaction). Is disorganized or unprepared in more than one way. Acts overly nervous or doubtful. Needs significant attention to this area.
Professional demeanor is lacking in one or more ways (dress, action, verbal interaction). Appears disorganized or unprepared in some way. Acts overly nervous or doubtful. Is developing in this area.
Presents themselves professionally in most ways. Is on time, but not as organized as desired. Accepts constructive criticism
Presents themselves as professional in dress, demeanor and verbal interaction. Is organized and on time. Is enthusiastic and eager. Accepts constructive criticism
Needs Major Support (0)
Emerging (1)
Developing (2)
Proficient (3) Junior Recital Ready
Exemplary (4) Senior Recital Ready

TECHNIQUE

Physical

Snare drum /multi-percussion posture and grip
Performer demonstrates several alignment and posture issues. Grip is problematic.
Performer demonstrates alignment or posture issues. Grip is inconsistent and/or tense.
Performer demonstrates aligned posture and correct grip some of the time.
Performer mostly demonstrates aligned posture and correct grip.
Performer demonstrates perfectly aligned posture and correct, relaxed and efficient grip. Maintains complete control of instrument.
Keyboard posture and grip
Performer demonstrates several alignment and posture issues. Grip is problematic.
Performer demonstrates alignment or posture issues. Grip is inconsistent and/or tense.
Performer demonstrates aligned posture and correct grip some of the time.
Performer mostly demonstrates aligned posture and correct grip.
Performer demonstrates perfectly aligned posture and correct, relaxed and efficient grip. Maintains complete control of instrument.
Timpani posture and grip
Performer demonstrates several alignment and posture issues. Grip is problematic.
Performer demonstrates alignment or posture issues. Grip is inconsistent and/or tense.
Performer demonstrates aligned posture and correct grip some of the time.
Performer mostly demonstrates aligned posture and correct grip.
Performer demonstrates perfectly aligned posture and correct, relaxed and efficient grip. Maintains complete control of instrument.

Sound

Tone quality on snare drum /multi-percussion
Performer does not demonstrate a characteristic tone on instrument.
Underdeveloped tone lacks focus and clarity. Rolls are lacking.
Tone is developing. Issues especially in dynamic extremes or fast passages. Rolls are underdeveloped and hands are often unmatched in sound.
Tone is well developed but is occasionally overlooked in challenging passages. Rolls are evident, but need refinement - occasionally hands are not matched.
Tone is mature, resonant, and beautiful. Rolls are consistent and demonstrate a matched sound between both hands.
Technical facility on snare drum /multi-percussion
Performance is severely underprepared. Technical flaws are prevalent and prevent getting through the performance. Performer has to restart several sections due to errors. Performer does not demonstrate understanding of the technique.
Performance is underprepared. Technical flaws hinder performance. Performer has to restart due to errors. Insecure stickings are predominant and interfere with the flow of the music. Markings are sometimes executed accurately enough but performer lacks understanding of the technique.
Performance is somewhat prepared. Technical facility is inconsistent but developing. Many stickings are insecure, causing several markings to be executed inaccurately. Lack of technique interferes with effectiveness of music. Performer is able to handle most stickings, but execution within the context of this music is weak.
Performance shows adequate preparation. Technical facility is very good, with minor flaws during difficult passages. Stickings are usually secure, though isolated errors or lapses occur. Markings are usually executed accurately as indicated in the score. Some fluency in technique may be lacking in a few small passages. Sticking serves to bring music alive most of the time.
Performance is extremely well prepared. Technical facility is fluid. Secure and appropriately nuanced stickings. Markings are executed accurately as indicated in the score. Passages are technically fluid/fluent and confident. Sticking serves to bring music alive.
Tone quality on keyboard instruments
Performer does not demonstrate a characteristic tone on instrument.
Underdeveloped tone lacks focus and clarity as performer often misses the center of the key and hits a node. Rolls are lacking.
Tone is developing. Issues especially in extended range, dynamic extremes, or fast passages. Rolls are underdeveloped and hands are often unmatched in sound. Performer occasionally misses a note and hits a node but these minor errors do not detract from the overall performance.
Tone is well developed but is occasionally overlooked in challenging passages, and performer almost always strikes in the center of the key. Rolls are evident, but need refinement - occasionally hands are not matched.
Tone is mature, resonant, and beautiful. Rolls are consistent and demonstrate a matched sound between both hands.
Technical facility on keyboard instruments
Performance is severely underprepared. Technical flaws are prevalent and prevent getting through the performance. Performer has to restart several sections due to errors. Performer does not demonstrate understanding of the technique.
Performance is underprepared. Technical flaws hinder performance. Performer has to restart due to errors. Insecure stickings are predominant and interfere with the flow of the music. Markings are sometimes executed accurately enough but performer lacks understanding of the technique.
Performance is somewhat prepared. Technical facility is inconsistent but developing. Many stickings are insecure, causing several markings to be executed inaccurately. Lack of technique interferes with effectiveness of music. Performer is able to handle most stickings, but execution within the context of this music is weak.
Performance shows adequate preparation. Technical facility is very good, with minor flaws during difficult passages. Stickings are usually secure, though isolated errors or lapses occur. Markings are usually executed accurately as indicated in the score. Some fluency in technique may be lacking in a few small passages. Sticking serves to bring music alive most of the time.
Performance is extremely well prepared. Technical facility is fluid. Secure and appropriately nuanced stickings. Markings are executed accurately as indicated in the score. Passages are technically fluid/fluent and confident. Sticking serves to bring music alive.
Tone quality on timpani
Performer does not demonstrate a characteristic tone on instrument.
Underdeveloped tone lacks focus and clarity as performer often strikes too close to the center of the head or too close to the edge. Rolls are lacking.
Tone is developing. Issues are apparent especially in dynamic extremes or fast passages. Performer occasionally strikes too close to the center of the head or too close to the edge. Rolls are underdeveloped and hands are often unmatched in sound.
Tone is well developed but is occasionally overlooked in challenging passages, and performer almost always strikes on the most resonant part of the head. Rolls are evident, but need refinement - occasionally hands are not matched.
Tone is mature, resonant, and beautiful. Rolls are consistent and demonstrate a matched sound between both hands.
Technical facility on timpani
Performance is severely underprepared. Technical flaws are prevalent and prevent getting through the performance. Performer has to restart several sections due to errors. Performer does not demonstrate understanding of the technique.
Performance is underprepared. Technical flaws hinder performance. Performer has to restart due to errors. Insecure stickings are predominant and interfere with the flow of the music. Markings are sometimes executed accurately enough but performer lacks understanding of the technique.
Performance is somewhat prepared. Technical facility is inconsistent but developing. Many stickings are insecure, causing several markings to be executed inaccurately. Lack of technique interferes with effectiveness of music. Student is able to handle most stickings, but execution within the context of this music is weak.
Performance shows adequate preparation. Technical facility is very good, with minor flaws during difficult passages. Stickings are usually secure, though isolated errors or lapses occur. Markings are usually executed accurately as indicated in the score. Some fluency in technique may be lacking in a few small passages. Sticking serves to bring music alive most of the time.
Performance is extremely well prepared. Technical facility is fluid. Secure and appropriately nuanced stickings. Markings are executed accurately as indicated in the score. Passages are technically fluid/fluent and confident. Stricking serves to bring music alive.
Intonation on timpani
Intonation is poor overall. Performer cannot successfully tune the timpani. Performer does not notice or attempt to adjust.
Notes at the beginning of the piece are in tune. Fast retuning passages are out of tune but performer does not attempt to adjust.
Challenging retuning passages are out of tune. Performer recognizes out of tune notes and strives to fix problematic passages. Performer can tune the timpani in general but lacks in speed, volume or accuracy.
Overall intonation is good; minor issues occur and performer demonstrates ability to adjust pitch. Performer almost always tunes the timpani quickly, quietly and accurately.
Outstanding intonation on all drums in every tuning scenario. Performer tunes the timpani quickly, quietly and accurately.

MUSICAL PREPARATION

Note Accuracy
Note errors interfere with musical flow. Performer must restart due to errors.
Note errors are evident but the overall performance remains somewhat effective.
Minor note errors during difficult passages do not detract from overall performance.
Music is played with 100% pitch accuracy.
Music is played with 100% pitch accuracy.
Rhythmic Accuracy
Rhythm errors interfere with musical flow. Performer must restart due to errors.
Rhythm errors are evident but the overall performance remains somewhat effective.
Rhythm errors during difficult passages do not detract from overall performance.
Music is played with 100% rhythmic accuracy.
Music is played with 100% rhythmic accuracy.
Dynamics
There are no dynamics in the performance.
Changes in dynamics (loud and soft) are apparent.
There are gradations of dynamics that correspond to where the composer has indicated. Louds and softs are clears, as are crescendos and diminuendos.
The majority of the written dynamics are performed with an emotional component attached.
All written dynamics are represented and the performer has considered other dynamic possibilities.
Phrasing
There are random breaks throughout the music. Very little evidence of phrasing consideration.
The performer often places a break in an inappropriate location. Performer’s sense of phrasing needs further development. Very little attention is paid to the musical line.
The performer mostly breaks in logical places. Phrasing is evident, but musical line lacks definition, nuance and/or fluidity.
The performer breaks in logical places. There is expressive shaping and contouring of phrases with some minor flaws.
The performer's breaks are barely noticeable. The performer demonstrates a mature sense of phrasing and musicianship.
Expression
The performer demonstrates no expression.
The performer demonstrates occasional expression but these seem forced and unnatural.
The performance is somewhat expressive, but often sound is harsh/distorted during passages with dynamic/range extremes and in general lies within a narrow dynamic range.
The performance is expressive most of the time, but sometimes sound is harsh/distorted during passages with dynamic/range extremes.
The performance is highly expressive. The performer portrays the essence of the music in a natural and effective manner.
Interpretation/Tempo
Performer lacks a fundamental understanding of the music. Tempo choices are not stylistically appropriate, and tempo is not consistent.
Performer lacks understanding of the music. Tempo choices are not often appropriate, and tempo is often inconsistent.
Performer’s musical interpretation is developing. Tempo choices are often appropriate, though tempo is sometimes inconsistent.
Performer displays a good understanding of the music and a clear sense of musical interpretation. Tempo choices are generally appropriate, and tempo is generally consistent.
Performer displays a deep understanding of the music to render an emotive musical interpretation. Tempo choices are appropriate, and tempo is always consistent.

Other

Accompaniment
Performer demonstrates no evidence of having practiced with accompanist and cannot get through performance due to errors.
Performer has difficulty playing with accompanist and needs to start over due to errors.
Performer can play with accompanist but has issues staying together. Communication is developing.
Performer plays well with accompanist but has a few minor instances where they are not together. Communication is evident.
Performer plays extremely well with accompanist. Communication and cohesion are evident and result in a successful performance.
Professional Disposition
Is not prepared, has not followed the established rules for jury preparation and performance. Reacts negatively to constructive criticism. Presents themselves as disheveled.
Professional demeanor is lacking in several ways (dress, action, verbal interaction). Is disorganized or unprepared in more than one way. Acts overly nervous or doubtful. Needs significant attention to this area.
Professional demeanor is lacking in one or more ways (dress, action, verbal interaction). Appears disorganized or unprepared in some way. Acts overly nervous or doubtful. Is developing in this area.
Presents themselves professionally in most ways. Is on time, but not as organized as desired. Accepts constructive criticism
Presents themselves as professional in dress, demeanor and verbal interaction. Is organized and on time. Is enthusiastic and eager. Accepts constructive criticism
Needs Major Support (0)
Emerging (1)
Developing (2)
Proficient (3) Junior Recital Ready
Exemplary (4) Senior Recital Ready

TECHNIQUE

Physical

Posture
Holds instrument incorrectly, has postural problems.
Holds instrument correctly but has alignment issues.
Performer demonstrates aligned posture some of the time. Sometimes demonstrates control of instrument.
Performer mostly demonstrates aligned posture. Maintains control of instrument.
Performer demonstrates perfectly aligned posture. Maintains control of instrument.
Bowing
Performer does not demonstrate evidence of proper bowing technique. Bow hold and placement on the string are problematic.
Bow hold is inconsistent and tense. Bow placement on strings is inconsistent and rarely parallel to the bridge.
Performer demonstrates correct bow hold most of the time. Bow placement on the string is usually parallel with bridge.
Performer demonstrates a correct bow hold almost all of the time. Bow placement on the string is parallel with the bridge.
Bow hold is correct, relaxed and efficient. Bow placement on the string is parallel and bowing is controlled.

Sound

Tone quality
Performer does not demonstrate a characteristic tone on instrument. No vibrato used.
Underdeveloped tone lacks focus, clarity and sounds forces or thin. Different positions and dynamics present great difficult in controlling tone. Vibrato at only the most basic level.
Tone is developing. Inconsistencies are evident in different positions and dynamics. Vibrato is underdeveloped.
Tone is well developed but occasionally limited by positions and dynamics. Vibrato is evident, but needs refinement.
Tone is mature, resonant, and focused throughout all strings, positions and dynamics. Use of vibrato is highly developed.
Left Hand Technique
LH moves slowly, and shifting is laborious and awkward. Demonstrates no understanding of shifting or fingering.
LH does not move smoothly and shifting is not accurate. Does not demonstrate consistent understanding of shifting and fingering. Technical passages are not executed with precision or clarity.
LH usually moves smoothly, but shifting to different positions creates slight hesitations. Demonstrates developing understanding of shifting and fingering. Technical passages have some clarity but also contain occasional lack of precision.
LH moves smoothly most of the time and shifting to different positions happens quickly with slightly audible breaks. Demonstrates a consistent understanding of shifting and fingering. Technical passages almost always have precision and clarity and display flexibility and facility.
LH moves smoothly throughout and shifting is well-executed and accurate. Demonstrates a skillful understanding of shifting and fingering. Technical passages are clear and precise, displaying flexibility, efficiency and refinement.
Intonation
Intonation is poor.
Notes that are in a comfortable range are in tune. Extended ranges, fast passages, and awkward leaps across strings are out of tune.
Most notes are played in tune but some obvious intonation issues occur, particularly when shifting, in higher positions, or when crossing strings. Performer recognizes out of tune notes and strives to fix problematic passages.
Overall intonation is good; minor issues occur when shifting, in higher positions, or when crossing strings. Performer demonstrates ability to adjust pitch.
Outstanding intonation on all strings, in all positions and at all dynamics.
Technical facility
Performance is severely underprepared. Technical flaws are prevalent and prevent getting through the performance. Performer has to restart several sections due to errors.
Performance is underprepared. Technical flaws hinder performance. Performer has to restart due to errors.
Performance is somewhat prepared. Technical facility is inconsistent but developing.
Performance shows adequate preparation. Technical facility is very good, with minor flaws during difficult passages.
Performance is extremely well prepared. Technical facility is fluid.
Articulation
No difference in articulations are noted for the most part. Performer does not demonstrate understanding of the technique.
Insecure attacks are predominant and interfere with the flow of the music. Markings are sometimes executed accurately enough but performer lacks understanding of bowing technique.
Many attacks are insecure, causing several markings to be executed inaccurately. Lack of bowing technique interferes with effectiveness of music. Student is able to handle most articulations, but bowing execution within the context of this music is weak.
Attacks are usually secure, though isolated errors or lapses occur. Markings are usually executed accurately as indicated in the score. Some fluency in technique may be lacking in a few small passages. Bowing serves to bring music alive most of the time.
Secure and appropriately nuanced attacks. Markings are executed accurately as indicated in the score. Passages are technically fluid/fluent and confident. Bowing serves to bring music alive.

MUSICAL PREPARATION

Note Accuracy
Note errors interfere with musical flow. Performer must restart due to errors.
Note errors are evident but the overall performance remains somewhat effective.
Minor note errors during difficult passages do not detract from overall performance.
Music is played with 100% pitch accuracy.
Music is played with 100% pitch accuracy.
Rhythmic Accuracy
Rhythm errors interfere with musical flow. Performer must restart due to errors.
Rhythm errors are evident but the overall performance remains somewhat effective.
Rhythm errors during difficult passages do not detract from overall performance.
Music is played with 100% rhythmic accuracy.
Music is played with 100% rhythmic accuracy.
Dynamics
There are no dynamics in the performance.
Changes in dynamics (loud and soft) are apparent.
There are gradations of dynamics that correspond to where the composer has indicated. Louds and softs are clears, as are crescendos and diminuendos.
The majority of the written dynamics are performed with an emotional component attached.
All written dynamics are represented and the performer has considered other dynamic possibilities.
Phrasing
There are random breaks throughout the music. Very little evidence of phrasing consideration.
The performer often places a break in an inappropriate location. Performer’s sense of phrasing needs further development. Very little attention is paid to the musical line.
The performer mostly breaks in logical places. Phrasing is evident, but musical line lacks definition, nuance and/or fluidity.
The performer breaks in logical places. There is expressive shaping and contouring of phrases with some minor flaws.
The performer's breaks are barely noticeable. The performer demonstrates a mature sense of phrasing and musicianship.
Expression
The performer demonstrates no expression.
The performer demonstrates occasional expression but these seem forced and unnatural.
The performance is somewhat expressive, but often sound is harsh/distorted during passages with dynamic/range extremes and in general lies within a narrow dynamic range.
The performance is expressive most of the time, but sometimes sound is harsh/distorted during passages with dynamic/range extremes.
The performance is highly expressive. The performer portrays the essence of the music in a natural and effective manner.
Interpretation/Tempo
Performer lacks a fundamental understanding of the music. Tempo choices are not stylistically appropriate, and tempo is not consistent.
Performer lacks understanding of the music. Tempo choices are not often appropriate, and tempo is often inconsistent.
Performer’s musical interpretation is developing. Tempo choices are often appropriate, though tempo is sometimes inconsistent.
Performer displays a good understanding of the music and a clear sense of musical interpretation. Tempo choices are generally appropriate, and tempo is generally consistent.
Performer displays a deep understanding of the music to render an emotive musical interpretation. Tempo choices are appropriate, and tempo is always consistent.

Other

Accompaniment
Performer demonstrates no evidence of having practiced with accompanist and cannot get through performance due to errors.
Performer has difficulty playing with accompanist and needs to start over due to errors.
Performer can play with accompanist but has issues staying together. Communication is developing.
Performer plays well with accompanist but has a few minor instances where they are not together. Communication is evident.
Performer plays extremely well with accompanist. Communication and cohesion are evident and result in a successful performance.
Professional Disposition
Is not prepared, has not followed the established rules for jury preparation and performance. Reacts negatively to constructive criticism. Presents themselves as disheveled.
Professional demeanor is lacking in several ways (dress, action, verbal interaction). Is disorganized or unprepared in more than one way. Acts overly nervous or doubtful. Needs significant attention to this area.
Professional demeanor is lacking in one or more ways (dress, action, verbal interaction). Appears disorganized or unprepared in some way. Acts overly nervous or doubtful. Is developing in this area.
Presents themselves professionally in most ways. Is on time, but not as organized as desired. Accepts constructive criticism
Presents themselves as professional in dress, demeanor and verbal interaction. Is organized and on time. Is enthusiastic and eager. Accepts constructive criticism
Needs Major Support (0)
Emerging (1)
Developing (2)
Proficient (3) Junior Recital Ready
Exemplary (4) Senior Recital Ready

TECHNIQUE

Physical

Posture
Holds instrument incorrectly, has postural problems.
Holds instrument correctly but has alignment issues.
Performer demonstrates aligned posture some of the time. Sometimes demonstrates control of instrument.
Performer mostly demonstrates aligned posture. Maintains control of instrument.
Performer demonstrates perfectly aligned posture. Maintains control of instrument.

Sound

Tone quality
Performer does not demonstrate a characteristic tone on instrument.
Underdeveloped tone lacks focus and clarity. Vibrato (if appropriate) is lacking.
Tone is developing. Fuzziness, lack of clarity sometimes evident, especially in range and dynamic extremes. Vibrato (if appropriate) is underdeveloped.
Tone is well developed but occasionally lacks clarity/resonance. Vibrato (if appropriate) is evident, but needs refinement.
Tone is mature, resonant, and beautiful, with vibrato (if appropriate).
Left Hand Technique
LH moves slowly, and shifting is laborious and awkward. Demonstrates no understanding of shifting or fingering.
LH does not move smoothly and shifting is not accurate. Does not demonstrate consistent understanding of shifting and fingering. Technical passages are not executed with precision or clarity.
LH usually moves smoothly, but shifting to different positions creates slight hesitations. Demonstrates developing understanding of shifting and fingering. Technical passages have some clarity but also contain occasional lack of precision.
LH moves smoothly most of the time and shifting to different positions happens quickly with slightly audible breaks. Demonstrates a consistent understanding of shifting and fingering. Technical passages almost always have precision and clarity and display flexibility and facility.
LH moves smoothly throughout and shifting is well-executed and accurate. Demonstrates a skillful understanding of shifting and fingering. Technical passages are clear and precise, displaying flexibility, efficiency and refinement.
Technical facility/Right Hand Technique
Performance is severely underprepared. Technical flaws are prevalent and prevent getting through the performance. Performer has to restart several sections due to errors. RH technique is inaccurate and lacks control.
Performance is underprepared. Technical flaws hinder performance. Performer has to restart due to errors. RH technique lacks accuracy and control.
Performance is somewhat prepared. Technical facility is inconsistent but developing. RH technique is somewhat accurate but is not always in control.
Performance shows adequate preparation. Technical facility is very good, with minor flaws during difficult passages. RH technique is mostly accurate and in control.
Performance is extremely well prepared. Technical facility is fluid. RH technique demonstrates accuracy and control.
Articulation
No difference in articulations are noted for the most part. Performer does not demonstrate understanding of the technique.
Insecure attacks are predominant and interfere with the flow of the music. Markings are sometimes executed accurately enough but performer lacks understanding of the technique.
Many attacks are insecure, causing several markings to be executed inaccurately. Lack of technique interferes with effectiveness of music. Student is able to handle most articulations, but execution within the context of this music is weak.
Attacks are usually secure, though isolated errors or lapses occur. Markings are usually executed accurately as indicated in the score. Some fluency in technique may be lacking in a few small passages. Articulation serves to bring music alive most of the time.
Secure and appropriately nuanced attacks. Markings are executed accurately as indicated in the score. Passages are technically fluid/fluent and confident. Articulation serves to bring music alive.

MUSICAL PREPARATION

Note Accuracy
Note errors interfere with musical flow. Performer must restart due to errors.
Note errors are evident but the overall performance remains somewhat effective.
Minor note errors during difficult passages do not detract from overall performance.
Music is played with 100% pitch accuracy.
Music is played with 100% pitch accuracy.
Rhythmic Accuracy
Rhythm errors interfere with musical flow. Performer must restart due to errors.
Rhythm errors are evident but the overall performance remains somewhat effective.
Rhythm errors during difficult passages do not detract from overall performance.
Music is played with 100% rhythmic accuracy.
Music is played with 100% rhythmic accuracy.
Dynamics
There are no dynamics in the performance.
Changes in dynamics (loud and soft) are apparent.
There are gradations of dynamics that correspond to where the composer has indicated. Louds and softs are clears, as are crescendos and diminuendos.
The majority of the written dynamics are performed with an emotional component attached.
All written dynamics are represented and the performer has considered other dynamic possibilities.
Phrasing
There are random breaks throughout the music. Very little evidence of phrasing consideration.
The performer often places a break in an inappropriate location. Performer’s sense of phrasing needs further development. Very little attention is paid to the musical line.
The performer mostly breaks in logical places. Phrasing is evident, but musical line lacks definition, nuance and/or fluidity.
The performer breaks/lifts in logical places. There is expressive shaping and contouring of phrases with some minor flaws.
The performer's breaks/lifts are barely noticeable. The performer demonstrates a mature sense of phrasing and musicianship.
Expression
The performer demonstrates no expression.
The performer demonstrates occasional expression but these seem forced and unnatural.
The performance is somewhat expressive, but often sound is harsh/distorted during passages with dynamic/range extremes and in general lies within a narrow dynamic range.
The performance is expressive most of the time, but sometimes sound is harsh/distorted during passages with dynamic/range extremes.
The performance is highly expressive. The performer portrays the essence of the music in a natural and effective manner.
Interpretation/Tempo
Performer lacks a fundamental understanding of the music. Tempo choices are not stylistically appropriate.
Performer lacks understanding of the music. Tempo choices are not often appropriate.
Performer’s musical interpretation is developing. Tempo choices are often appropriate.
Performer displays a good understanding of the music and a clear sense of musical interpretation. Tempo choices are generally appropriate.
Performer displays a deep understanding of the music to render an emotive musical interpretation. Tempo choices are appropriate.

Other

Professional Disposition
Is not prepared, has not followed the established rules for jury preparation and performance. Reacts negatively to constructive criticism. Presents themselves as disheveled.
Professional demeanor is lacking in several ways (dress, action, verbal interaction). Is disorganized or unprepared in more than one way. Acts overly nervous or doubtful. Needs significant attention to this area.
Professional demeanor is lacking in one or more ways (dress, action, verbal interaction). Appears disorganized or unprepared in some way. Acts overly nervous or doubtful. Is developing in this area.
Presents themselves professionally in most ways. Is on time, but not as organized as desired. Accepts constructive criticism
Presents themselves as professional in dress, demeanor and verbal interaction. Is organized and on time. Is enthusiastic and eager. Accepts constructive criticism
Needs Major Support (0)
Emerging (1)
Developing (2)
Proficient (3) Junior Recital Ready
Exemplary (4) Senior Recital Ready

TECHNIQUE

Physical

Posture
Severe postural problems.
Shoulders sometimes low, chest sometimes lifted, neck sometimes tall.
Shoulders often quiet and low, Chest often high, Neck often tall.
Shoulders down and rarely move, Chest often in a lifted position allowing for ribs to expand, Head sits high upon the neck.
Shoulders down, ribs expanded, head tall.
Breathing
Breathing is high and shallow; breaths occurs in the wrong locations;
Singer is able to recognize, articulate, and demonstrate proper breathing.
Breathing is low and centered. Shoulders are usually down on inhalation and breaths are usually silent and on the vowel about to be sung.
Breathing is low and centered. Shoulders remain low on inhalations and breaths are generally deep and silent even in fast passages.
Breathing is low, deep, and silent. Phrases are sung comfortably with adequate breath.
Vocal Mechanism
Apparatus is closed and tense.
Singer drops the jaw and relaxes the vocal apparatus when music is slow and in a comfortable range.
Vocal apparatus is often in proper alignment for the music being sung. The proper amount of relaxation and tension is able to be demonstrated.
Vocal apparatus is usually in proper alignment for the music being sung.
Apparatus is relaxed and open

Vocal Quality

Tone quality
Tone is forced and unpleasant
Singer demonstrates beautiful tone in comfortable ranges. Passages that are extended, fast, awkward, or at dynamic extremes may be out of tune.
Tone is often beautiful in more challenging passages and is usually beautiful in simple passages in a comfortable range.
The tone is usually beautiful.
Tone is beautiful and related to the text being sung.
Placement - focus
Voice is unfocused with no sense of placement.
Singer can demonstrate the concept of ringing tone and examples can be found in the repertoire.
A ringing tone is often found in the repertoire and the singer usually finds the tone when it is lost in a passage.
A ringing tone is evident throughout the majority of the repertoire.
Tone is well-placed and consistent throughout the register.
Projection - resonance
Voice has little resonance and little dynamic contrast.
The voice is sometimes resonant and there are dynamic contrasts from mp - mf that are resonant and not forced.
The voice is often resonant and it reaches dynamics from p - f while maintaining ease and ring.
The voice is resonant throughout p - f dynamics. Resonance/beautiful may be lost at extreme dynamics.
Voice is resonant with great dynamic contrast

Diction

Vowels
Vowels are indistinct and lack overtones.
There is an understanding of open and closed vowels and these are easily heard in songs.
Italian vowels are clear and correct, with an demonstrable understanding of open and closed.
English, Italian, and German vowels are clear and correct.
Vowels are clear and correct in each language.
Consonants
Consonants are audible but lack crispness and often interrupt the flow of the breath and following vowel.
Consonants are audible and sometimes interrupt breath flow yet rarely affect the following vowel.
Consonants are clear, do not affect the following vowel, although they may still interrupt breath flow.
Consonants are clear and do not interrupt breath flow or purity of vowels.
Articulation
Articulation is not legato and there is variation of articulation.
Slow passages exhibit legato. Singer is able to move slowly from vowel to vowel without being impeded by consonants.
Music is often legato and connected. There is evidence of other articulations in the music and the consonants are not impeding the vowels.
Music is usually legato and connected with conscious choices made for other articulations.
Legato is the norm and is well maintained. Other articulations are apparent as called for by the music.

MUSICAL PREPARATION

Notes
Music is sung with less than 90% pitch accuracy.
Music is sung with 90% pitch accuracy
Music is sung with maximum of 2 pitch mistakes per song.
Music is sung with 100% pitch accuracy.
Music is sung with 100% pitch accuracy.
Rhythms
Music is sung with less than 90% rhythmic accuracy.
Music is sung with 90% Accuracy
Music is sung with maximum of 2 rhythmic mistakes per song.
Music is sung with 100% rhythmic accuracy.
Music is sung with 100% rhythmic accuracy.
Intonation
Many notes are out of tune.
Notes that are in a comfortable range are in tune. Extended ranges, fast passages, and awkward leaps may be out of tune.
Most notes are sung in tune. Singer recognizes out of tune singing and strives to fix problematic passages.
The singer sings in tune with only small problems during extended or particularly challenging passages.
All notes are sung in tune.
Dynamics
There are no dynamics in the performance.
Changes in dynamics (loud and soft) are apparent.
There are gradations of dynamics that correspond to where the composer has indicated. Louds and softs are clears, as are crescendos and diminuendos.
The singer sings a minimum of 90% of the written dynamics with an emotional component attached.
All written dynamics are represented and the singer has considered other dynamic possibilities.
Memory
Not memorized
Music is sung with 90% Accuracy
Music is sung with maximum of 2 small mistakes per song.
Music is sung 100% correctly.
Music is sung 100% correctly.
Phrasing
There are random breaths throughout the music.
The singer always breathes in the correct places, but often needs catch breaths in inappropriate locations.
The singer breathes in the correct places and plans catch breaths at the least offensive musical moments.
The singer breathes in the correct places and rarely needs a catch breath.
The singer breathes in the correct places.
Diction
The words are indecipherable to the listener.
Music is sung with 75% accurate diction. The singer makes immediate improvement in English diction and understands the basic rules of Italian Diction.
Music is sung in English and Italian with 90% accurate diction. The singer is capable of singing in German.The singer understands the basic rules of Italian Diction and is able to write out lyrics in IPA with 90% accuracy.
Music is sung in English and Italian with 99% accurate diction. Music is sung in German with 90% accurate diction.The singer understands the basic rules of German Diction and is able to write out German lyrics in IPA with 90% accuracy.
Music is sung in English, Italian, and German with 99% accurate diction. Music is sung in French with 75% accurate diction.The singer understands the basic rules of French Diction and is able to write out French lyrics in IPA with 75% accuracy.
Expression
The singer lacks eye contact and facial expression. The body is rigid and tone is independent of the text.
The singer shows occasional facial expression and is capable of making eye contact with the audience. The body is very rigid or expresses too much nervous movement.
The singer often shows the emotion of the text with the face although it may appear disingenuous. The eyes are sometimes used as an effective mode of communication. The body is not rigid and sometimes depicts the emotion of the music being sung.
The singer shows the emotion of the text with the face or with the eyes 75% of the time. The singer's body is expressive and represents the meaning of the text.
The eyes, body, and face all portray the meaning of the music in a natural and effective manner.
Needs Major Support (0)
Emerging (1)
Developing (2)
Proficient (3) Junior Recital Ready
Exemplary (4) Senior Recital Ready

TECHNIQUE

Physical

Posture
Lacks awareness of bench positioning, head-body alignment
Able to recognize, articulate and sometimes demonstrate the proper alignment of head, shoulder, and torso
Bench positioning is usually adequate; head-shoulder-torso alignment fluctuates; arm movements are adequate but sluggish or jerky.
Bench positioning is generally stable; head is mostly well-aligned with torso and shoulders; arm movements are mostly efficient and swift
Strong bench positioning; head, shoulder, torso well-aligned; arm movements are agile and efficient
Hand-shape
Hand is flat, unstructured, or tense,
good arch, natural curve and firm tips only occasionally, on easier/slower passages
maintains an arch, natural curve and firm tips more often than not; finger action fluctuates between unneeded and efficient motions
mostly able to maintain an arch, natural curve, firm tips; finger action is mostly efficient and initiated from key
consistently able to maintain an arch, a natural curve that varies with different styles, and firm tips. Finger action is efficient and aimed at the key's point of sound
Hand-arm alignment
Lacks awareness of hand-arm alignment
constantly shifts in and out of alignment and is not regularly connecting hand to arm
Hand-arm alignment is emergent but fluctuates from passage to passage
Hand-arm alignment is mostly strong, allowing for ease in most passages
Hand-arm alignment is strong at virtually all times, supporting ease in achieving musical goals

Sound

Tone
lacks awareness for a stylistically appropriate tone and the means to achieve it.
Tone is sometimes pleasant and at other times still harsh or overly percussive.
Tone is mostly pleasant and efficiently produced
Tone is pleasant, efficiently produced, and well projected.
Tone is pleasant, efficiently produced, well projected, and supports the musical goals of the piece at hand.
Pedaling
lacks awareness of pedal technique and timing
Pedaling is perfunctory and can be one-dimensional or noisy
Pedaling is mostly successful in harmonically straightforward passages but lacks finesse and is unclear in rhythmically or harmonically complex passages; Classical and Baroque repertoire tends to be over- or under-pedaled
Pedaling is mostly clean and stylistically appropriate with relatively few lapses in the ability to adapt to acoustic conditions
Pedaling is clean, varied, positively enhances interpretation, and adaptive to acoustic conditions; timing is nuanced and activation is quiet
Articulation
Lacks awareness and differentiation in articulation types
able to show a limited but adequate range of articulation types for the repertoire required
able to demonstrate articulation types on the far ends of the spectrum (legato, staccato) but lacks more subtle variations such as portato and leggiero
Articulation is mostly intentional, relatively precise, and demonstrates a range of types
Articulation is intentional, precise, supportive of musical expression, and varied.

MUSICAL PREPARATION

Notes
Music is played with less than 90% pitch accuracy.
Music is played with 90% pitch accuracy
Music is played with 95% pitch accuracy
Performance is virtually error-free.
Music is played virtually error-free.
Rhythmic Durations
Music is played with less than 90% rhythmic accuracy.
Music is played with 90% accuracy
Music is played with 95% rhythmic accuracy
Performance is 95% - 100% rhythmically accurate.
Music is played with virtually 100% rhythmic accuracy.
Meter and Tempo
unable to maintain a steady pulse and lacks awareness of tempo
achieves pulse stability but meter and tempo are not always well projected
Pulse stability is generally strong; metrical hierarchy is apparent and tempo shows awareness of composer's intent
maintains a stable pulse; fluctuations in tempo are intentional, noticeable, and follow score
maintains a stable pulse and but is able to vary it in subtle ways in service of expression; fluctuations in tempo are intentional, noticeable, and follow score
Dynamics
There are no dynamics in the performance.
Changes in dynamics (loud and soft) are apparent.
There are gradations of dynamics that correspond to where the composer has indicated. Louds and softs are clears, as are crescendos and diminuendos.
plays a minimum of 90% of the written dynamics with an emotional component attached.
All written dynamics are represented and the pianist has considered other dynamic possibilities.
Memory
Not memorized
Memory requirement achieved with 90% Accuracy
Memory requirement achieved with 90% - 95% accuracy
Memory requirement achieved with 95% accuracy
Memory requirement is virtually problem-free
Presence/Expression
Pianist lacks a performative presence
Pianist shows an emerging sense of performative playing
Pianist's presence fluctuates between involvement and passivity
Pianist is generally involved with the music and communicates beyond accuracy in delivery
Pianist's presence conveys a deep and sustained involvement with the music and a genuine effort to communicate with the audience
Needs Major Support (0)
Emerging (1)
Developing (2)
Proficient (3) Junior Recital Ready
Exemplary (4) Senior Recital Ready
TECHNIQUE
Physical
Posture/Embouchure
Holds instrument incorrectly, has postural problems. Sound is inconsistent and problematic.
Holds instrument correctly but has alignment issues. Sound is inconsistent but improving.
Performer demonstrates aligned posture some of the time and correct and characteristic tone. Sometimes demonstrates control of instrument.
Performer mostly demonstrates aligned posture and correct embouchure, support, hand position, and body alignment. Maintains control of instrument.
Performer demonstrates perfectly aligned posture and correct embouchure. Maintains control of instrument.
Breathing
Performer does not demonstrate evidence of proper breathing technique.
Performer is able to recognize, articulate, and demonstrate proper breathing for horns and touch for rhythm section players, but lacks enough consistency to play through several phrases with adequate tone consistency.
Breath support is sometimes strong but is developing for winds. Intonation and tone are often affected. Rhythm section sometimes displays proper touch and position.
Almost always consistent breath support for winds, and proper touch and position for rhythm section players. Intonation and tone are rarely affected.
Strong and consistent breath support for winds throughout. Proper touch and position for rhythm section players. Intonation and tone are spot on.
Sound
Tone quality
Performer does not demonstrate a characteristic jazz tone on instrument.
Underdeveloped tone lacks focus and clarity. Vibrato (if appropriate) is lacking
Tone is developing. Fuzziness, lack of clarity sometimes evident, especially in range and dynamic extremes. Vibrato (if appropriate) is underdeveloped.
Tone is well developed but occasionally lacks clarity/resonance. Vibrato (if appropriate) is evident, but needs refinement.
Tone in all ranges is mature, resonant, and beautiful, with vibrato (if appropriate).
Intonation
Intonation is poor. Poor breath support, poor finger position adversely affects intonation
Notes that are in a comfortable range are in tune. Extended ranges, fast passages, and awkward leaps are out of tune.
Most notes are played in tune but some obvious intonation issues occur. Performer recognizes out of tune notes and strives to fix problematic lines.
Overall intonation is good; minor issues occur and performer demonstrates ability to adjust pitch.
Outstanding intonation in all registers and volumes.
Technical facility
Performance is severely underprepared. Technical flaws are prevalent and prevent getting through the performance. Performer has to restart several sections due to errors.
Performance is underprepared. Technical flaws hinder performance. Performer has to restart due to errors.
Performance is somewhat prepared. Technical facility is inconsistent but developing.
Performance shows adequate preparation. Technical facility is very good, with minor flaws during difficult passages.
Performance is extremely well prepared. Technical facility is fluid.
Articulation
No characteristic jazz articulations are noted for the most part. Performer does not demonstrate understanding of the technique.
Insecure attacks are predominant and interfere with the flow of the music. Stylistic characteristics are sometimes executed accurately enough but performer lacks understanding of details that need to be executed to establish the tone/swing feel relationship..
Many attacks and releases are insecure, causing several sections to be executed inaccurately. Lack of technique, tonguing, or improper finger position interferes with effectiveness of music. Student is able to handle most phrasings, but execution within the context of this music is weak.
Attacks and releases are usually secure, though isolated errors or lapses occur. Jazz phrasing is usually executed accurately as indicated by the style and the tune. Some fluency in technique may be lacking in the line. Jazz articulation/ phrasing serves to bring music alive most of the time.
Secure and appropriately nuanced attacks. Jazz phrasing is executed accurately as indicated by the style and the tune. Passages are technically fluid/fluent and confident. Jazz articulation/phrasing serves to bring music alive.
MUSICAL PREPARATION
Note Accuracy
Note errors interfere with musical flow. Performer must restart due to errors.
Note errors are evident but the overall performance remains somewhat effective.
Minor note errors during difficult passages do not detract from overall performance.
Music is played with 100% pitch accuracy.
Music is played with 100% pitch accuracy.
Rhythmic Accuracy
Rhythm errors interfere with musical flow. Performer must restart due to errors.
Rhythm errors are evident but the overall performance remains somewhat effective.
Rhythm errors during difficult passages do not detract from overall performance.
Music is played with 100% rhythmic accuracy.
Music is played with 100% rhythmic accuracy.
Dynamics
There are no dynamics in the performance.This includes ghosting to facilitate a swing feel.
Changes in dynamics (loud and soft) are apparent.
There are gradations of dynamics that correspond to where the stylistic protocols of the piece performed. Louds and softs are clears, as are crescendos and diminuendos.
The majority of the implied dynamics required to achieve a solid swing feel are performed with an emotional component attached.
All implied dynamics required to achieve a solid swing feel are represented and the performer has considered other creative ways to explore dynamic possibilities.
Phrasing
There are random pauses throughout the music. Very little evidence of phrasing consideration.
The performer often places awkward pauses in inappropriate places. Performer’s sense of phrasing needs further development. Very little attention is paid to the musical line.
The performer mostly breathes or pauses in logical places. Phrasing is evident, but musical line lacks definition, nuance and/or fluidity.
The performer breathes or pauses in logical places. There is expressive shaping and contouring of phrases with some minor flaws.
The performer's breaths, shifts, and or pauses are barely noticeable. The performer
demonstrates a
mature sense of
phrasing and
musicianship.
Expression
The performer demonstrates no expression.
The performer demonstrates occasional expression but these seem forced and unnatural.
The performance is somewhat expressive, but often sound is harsh/distorted during passages with dynamic/range extremes and in general lies within a narrow dynamic range.
The performance is expressive most of the time, but sometimes sound is harsh/distorted during passages with dynamic/range extremes.
The performance is highly expressive. The performer portrays the essence of the music in a natural and effective manner.
Interpretation/Tempo
Performer lacks a fundamental understanding of the music. Tempo choices are not stylistically appropriate, and tempo is not consistent.
Performer lacks understanding of the music. Tempo choices are not often appropriate, and tempo is often inconsistent.
Performer’s musical interpretation is developing. Tempo choices are often appropriate, though tempo is sometimes inconsistent.
Performer displays a good understanding of the music and a clear sense of musical interpretation. Tempo choices are generally appropriate, and tempo is generally consistent.
Performer displays a deep understanding of the music to render an emotive musical interpretation. Tempo choices are appropriate, and tempo is always consistent.
Other
Accompaniment
Performer demonstrates no evidence of having practiced with background track or live band and cannot get through performance due to errors.
Performer demonstrates no evidence of having practiced with background track or live band and cannot get through performance due to errors. .
Performer can play with band but has issues staying together. Communication is developing.
Performer plays well with band but has a few minor instances where they are not together. Communication is evident.
Performer plays extremely well with band. Communication and cohesion are evident and result in a successful performance.
Professional Disposition
Is not prepared, has not followed the established rules for jury preparation and performance. Reacts negatively to constructive criticism. Presents themselves as disheveled.
Professional demeanor is lacking in several ways (dress, action, verbal interaction). Is disorganized or unprepared in more than one way. Acts overly nervous or doubtful. Needs significant attention to this area.
Professional demeanor is lacking in one or more ways (dress, action, verbal interaction). Appears disorganized or unprepared in some way. Acts overly nervous or doubtful. Is developing in this area.
Presents themselves professionally in most ways. Is on time, but not as organized as desired. Accepts constructive criticism
Presents themselves as professional in dress, demeanor and verbal interaction. Is organized and on time. Is enthusiastic and eager. Accepts constructive criticism

Piano Proficiency Exam

Relevant to: All Music Majors in the B.A. program


The Piano Proficiency Exam at the Cal State East Bay Department of Music assesses competencies that demonstrate basic functionality at the keyboard, appropriate to a Bachelor of Arts student in Music. In order to graduate, all CSUEB Music students must pass the Piano Proficiency Exam OR complete three (3) semesters of group keyboard study.

The most efficient way to fulfill this requirement is to complete the Keyboard Musicianship sequence (MUS 118, MUS 119, and MUS 218). Students who pass the sequence with a minimum grade of C are not required to take the piano proficiency exam.

While some students elect to work on proficiency requirements independently, it is highly discouraged and may significantly delay graduation. Students not enrolled in Keyboard Musicianship courses who wish to demonstrate their mastery of proficiency items may only do so during the fall and spring Final Exam period.

Contact Dr. Shimron at least 14-21 days in advance to schedule the exam.

Please follow the guidelines and use the examples below to prepare for the Piano Proficiency Exam. All examples are taken from Alfred’s Group Piano for Adults, 2nd Ed., (Lancaster, 2004)

Technique:
Harmonization and Transposition:
  • Students will be asked to play two (2) harmonizations and transpose each one.
    • Harmonization No. 1 will contain a melody with no given chords. Students will need to choose and play tonally appropriate chords in LH while playing the melody in the RH, followed by a transposition to a different key. Chords should be derived from primary triads (I, IV, V7), with a logical progression that builds on the common practice Phrase Model. Students will need to play chords in LH (blocked or broken) while playing the melody in the RH, followed by a transposition to a different key.
    • Harmonization No. 2 will contain a melody with given chords in the form of lead-sheet symbols (pop/chord symbols) or Roman numerals. Students will need to play chords in LH while playing the melody in the RH, followed by a transposition to a different key. Chords may contain diatonic and chromatic chords (secondary dominants, etc.)
  • Prepare the following examples or equivalent examples with prior approval of Dr. Shimron.

Sing-and-Play

  • Choose one of the excerpts below or another excerpt of equal or greater difficulty.
  • Sing the melody on (a) neutral syllable (“la”) or (b) solfège or (c) text/lyrics.
  • Play an accompaniment throughout based on the pattern at the beginning of the song
  • Use appropriate harmonies based on the chord symbols and use a variety of chord inversions.
  • Accompaniment must match the character of the song

Sight Reading

  • Students will be asked to sight-read excerpts at the difficulty level of the examples given below. Excerpts might be in major or minor keys.
  • Students will have one minute to silently study the example before playing.
  • Play with an emphasis on continuity. Rhythm is more important than pitch here.
Repertoire
  • Choose one piece of equal or greater difficulty compared to the examples below. You must obtain prior approval from Dr. Shimron for any substitutions. Prepare and perform, paying attention to the grading criteria listed below. Memorization is not required.
  • Note accuracy
  • Fingering accuracy
  • Harmonic accuracy (harmonizing melodies with tonally appropriate chords)
  • Rhythmic accuracy
  • Tempo appropriateness
  • Pulse stability
  • Expression and musicality: including dynamics, articulation, tone quality, etc.
  • Technique: including hand position, posture, etc.
  • Continuity

Theory Placement Exam

Relevant to: All incoming transfer students

The Theory Placement Exam (done online through uTheory) asses the incoming transfer student's theory profiencey in order to better determine their placement within our theory sequence, as well as determines if they are ready for our upper division theory courses. All transfer students must take this exam before registering for music courses.
In order to prepare for the exam, we suggest students review Chapters 1-34 of our theory textbook (Concise Introduction to Tonal Harmony).
If you have any questions about the exam, please contact ines.thiebaut@csueastbay.edu

Mid-Comprehensive Graduate Examination

Relevant to: Graduate Students in the M.A. program

The Music Mid-Comprehensive Examination is designed to test students’ core knowledge of Western music theory and analysis, as well as the history of concert music in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The exam was instituted to assess a student's grasp of foundational knowledge in the discipline at the midpoint of a two-year residency, and as an internal benchmark to determine eligibility for advancement to candidacy.
 
Following the completion of two semesters, and having successfully completed MUS 600 (Research Methodology) MUS 601A (Analysis of Musical Styles I) and MUS 615 (Music in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries), students will be given two take-home questions. One  question will assess the students’ competencies in music analysis and theory; the second question will assess the students’ skills in regards to stylistic and compositional developments since 1900. Responses, in the form of essays, will be evaluated on a pass/fail basis by the Graduate Studies Committee. Students who reveal deficiencies in core knowledge and skills will be asked to self-remediate in areas highlighted by the committee before enrolling in further coursework.