Top NavTop NavTop Nav

Erica L. Wildy, Ph.D. Faculty Profile

Photo of Erica Wildy

Erica  L.  Wildy, Ph.D.

Faculty

Department of Biological Sciences

I am currently maintaining several lines of research in my lab including: 1) Animal behavior and Ecology; 2) Undergraduate Science Education; and 3) Informal Science Education.

Undergraduate Science Education - The current focus of my personal research involves, broadly speaking, an examination of student learning at the undergraduate level. Born out of my love of teaching, sharing my love of biology, and working with students, I am extremely passionate about identifying and understanding the mechanisms behind increasing student engagement in the classroom and increasing both short term and long term academic performance. Much of my current efforts have focused on freshmen biology majors in first year biology courses here at CSUEB. Recent/ongoing projects includes an examination of the effect of supplemental instruction on academic performance in freshmen in an introductory majors biology course; preference versus use of e-texts in freshmen in a first year biology courses; theme-based learning in a non-majors biology course; and increaing retention of undergraduate students in STEM majors through collaboration, cohorting, and the leveraging of existing resources.   

Informal Science Education at the College/University Level - One of my latest passions is informal science education. Informal science education refers to science-based education that takes place outside of a traditional classroom. These alternatives venues may include museums, aquaira, and zoos amongst others. Using experience I gained through a short stint as the Senior Science Educator at the California Academy of Sciences (The Academy) in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, I am interested in working on projects that allow me to examine how working on informal science learning projects can enhance the academic performance of science majors' academic performance. One area of focus for me is our biology department's own natural history collections. Our collections contain tens of thousands of specimens of marine invertebrates, insects, fishes, amphibians, reptiles (including birds) and mammals. I have created an indepndent study program that I have named SCOLEX (Science COllections Learning EXperience) in which biology and biochemistry majors work on various tasks in support of the collections. Through this program, I will be collecting data on a variety of elements including students' experiences and their academic performance here at CSUEB in an effort to establish how a program like this can both assist a department in maintaining their natural history collections while providing student workers with valuable academic experience. Besides my efforts in this arena, I am also very interested in engaging in partnerships with informal science centers, such as the Oakland Zoo, to further science literacy in students as well as the general public.      

Animal Behavior, Animal Ecology - I am a behavioral ecologist by training with interests in animal behavior, behavioral ecology, and herpetology. My doctoral research was conducted out of Oregon State University in the lab of Dr. Andrew R. Blaustein. Fascinated by agonistic interactions I observed in local larval amphibian populations, my thesis research ultimately involved the exploration of the ecological significance of cannibalism in populations of larval long-toed salamanders (Ambysotma macrodactylum macrodactylum and A. m. columbianum). At CSUEB, while I do not currently maintain a parent project with this focus, I continue to accept graduate students who are interested in studying any number of behavioral and ecological questions involving a variety of animal, particularly vertebrate, species. Although my past research has primarily focused on population-level questions, I am certainly open to projects at the community and ecosystem levels.

  • Ph.D., Zoology, Oregon State University
  • B.S. Biological Sciences, Cornell University
Fall Quarter 2017
Course #SecCourse TitleDaysFromToLocationCampusTextbook Info
BIOL 140301Animal BiologyMWF12:00PM1:10PMMI-2032Hayward Campus View Books
BIOL 14031AAnimal BiologyM9:20AM11:50AMSC-N313Hayward Campus View Books
BIOL 490008Independent StudyARRARRHayward Campus View Books
BIOL 690002Independent StudyARRARRHayward Campus View Books

Nielsen S., Soules A., Le Duc D., Inouye C., Singley J., Wildy E., and Seitz J. 2014. Embedding Multiple Literacies into STEM Curricula. College Teaching 62(4): 121-128.

Blaustein AR, Wildy E.L., Belden LK, Hatch A.  2001.  Influence of abiotic and biotic factors on amphibians in ephemeral ponds with special reference to long-toed salamanders (Ambystoma macrodactylum). Israel Journal of Zoology 47 (4): 333-345.

Chivers D.P., Wildy E.L., Kiesecker J.M., and Blaustein, A.R. 2001. Avoidance response of juvenile Pacific Treefrogs to chemical cues of introduced predatory bullfrogs. Journal of Chemical Ecology 27: 1667-1676.

Wildy, E.L. and Blaustein, A.R. 2001. Learned recognition of intraspecific predators in larval long-toed salamanders, Ambystoma macrodactylum. Ethology 107: 479-493.

Wildy, E.L., D.P. Chivers, Kiesecker, J.M., and A.R. Blaustein. 2001. The effect of food and density on biting and cannibalism in larval long-toed salamanders, Ambystoma macrodactylum. Oecologia 128: 202-209.

Belden, L.K., Wildy, E.L., and Blaustein, A.R  2000. Growth, survival and behaviour of larval long-toed salamanders (Ambystoma macrodactylum) exposed to ambient levels of UV-B radiation. Journal of Zoology 251: 473-479.

Belden, L.K., Wildy, E.L., Hatch, A.C. and Blaustein, A.R. 2000. Juvenile western toads (Bufo boreas) avoid chemical cues of snakes fed juvenile, but not larval, conspecifics. Animal   Behaviour 59: 871-875.

Chivers, D.P. Kiesecker, J.M., Marco, A., Wildy, E.L., and Blaustein, A.R. 1999. Shifts in life history as a response to predation in western toads (Bufo boreas). Journal of Chemical Ecology. 25: 2455-2463.

Chivers, D.P., Kiesecker, J.M., Wildy, E.L., Belden, L.K., Kats, L.B., and Blaustein, A.R. 1999. Avoidance response of post-metamorphic anurans to cues of injured conspecifics and predators. Journal of Herpetology 33: 472-476.

Wildy, E.L., Chivers, D.P., and Blaustein, A.R. 1999. Shifts in life history traits as a response to cannibalism in larval long-toed salamanders (Ambystoma macrodactylum). Journal of Chemical Ecology 25: 2337-234.

DeVito, J., Chivers, D.P., Kiesecker, J.M., Marco, A., Wildy, E.L., and Blaustein, A.R. 1998. The effects of snake predation on metamorphosis of western toads (Bufo boreas). Ethology 104: 185-193.

Wildy, E.L., D.P. Chivers, Kiesecker, J.M., and A.R. Blaustein. 1998. Cannibalism enhances growth in larval long-toed salamanders (Ambystoma macrodactylum). Journal of Herpetology 32: 286-289.

Chivers, D.P., Wildy, E.L., and Blaustein, A.R. 1997. Eastern long-toed (Ambystoma macrodactylum columbianum) larvae recognize cannibalistic conspecifics. Ethology 103: 187-197.

Chivers, D.P., Kiesecker, J.M., Wildy, E.L., Anderson, M.T., and Blaustein, A.R. 1997. Chemical alarm signaling in salamanders:  intra- and interspecific responses. Ethology 103: 599-613.

Chivers, D.P., Kiesecker, J.M., Anderson, M.T., Wildy, E.L., and Blaustein, A.R. 1996. Avoidance response of a terrestrial salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) to chemical alarm cues. Journal of Chemical Ecology 22: 1709-1716.

Riesecrer (Kiesecker), J.M., Anderson, M.T., Chivers, D.P., Wildy, E.L., DeVito, J., Marco, A., Blaustein, A.R., Beatty, J.J., and Storm, R.M. 1996. Plethodon dunni (Dunn’s salamander) cannibalism. Herpetological Review 27: 194.

Invited Oral Presentation: Wildy, E., Inouye, C., LeDuc, D., Richardson, A., and Yeager, B. Supporting Undergraduates through Caring, Collaboration and Empowerment to Succeed in STEM. 2017. STEM Conference, Los Angeles, CA.

E-Portfolio Presentation: Wildy E., Nguyen, J., Hanna, W., Yeager, B., and Weiss, J. Nielsen S. 2017. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Redesigning Introductory Majors And Non-Majors Biology Courses for Student Success. CSU Summer Institute on Course Redesign with Technology, Sacramento, CA.  

E-Portfolio Presentation: Wildy E., Inouye C., Nielsen S., Soules A., and Diana Wakimoto. 2015. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Redesigning Introductory Majors And Non-Majors Biology Courses for Student Success. CSU Summer Institute on Course Redesign with Technology, Sacramento, CA.  

Invited Oral Presentation: Wildy Erica, Inouye Caron, Nielsen Sarah, Soules Aline, and Diana Wakimoto. 2015. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Redesigning Introductory Majors And Non-Majors Biology Courses for Student Success. CSU Summer Institute on Course Redesign with Technology, Sacramento, CA.  

Poster Presentation: Wildy Erica, Inouye Caron, Nielsen Sarah, Soules Aline, and Diana Wakimoto. April 2015. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Redesigning Introductory Biology:Improving Student Success in BIOL 1403 (Animal Biology). CSU Symposium on University Teaching. California State University, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.

Invited Oral Presentation: Wildy Erica, Inouye Caron, Nielsen Sarah, Soules Aline, and Diana Wakimoto. 2014. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Redesigning Introductory Biology for the 21st Century: Improving Student Success in BIOL 1403 (Animal Biology). CSU Academic Technology Initiatives Day, Hayward, CA.

Poster Presentation: Wildy Erica, Inouye Caron, Nielsen Sarah, Soules Aline, and Diana Wakimoto. 2014. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Redesigning Introductory Biology for the 21st Century: Improving Student Success in BIOL 1403 (Animal Biology). CSU Summer Institute on Course Redesign with Technology, Los Angeles, CA.  

Session Chair: April 15, 2011. CSU Undergraduate Research Leadership Conference, CSU Channel Islands, Channel Islands, CA.

2017: Faculty Advising Fellow, Summer 2017-Spring 2018 (12 WTUs release).

2017: No-Cost Extension (AY 2017-18), Helmsley Charitable Trust/CSU STEM Collaboratives Grant (co-PI).

2016: Participant in the Faculty Learning Program (funded by NSF IUSE grant), AY 2016-17.

2016: CSU Chancellor’s Sustaining Success Grant (PI, $14,277)

2016: Exceptional Level of Service (Faculty Affairs Committee) Award (3 WTUs release)

2015: Provost’s Mini-Planning Grants for Innovation in Instruction ($1,000 + 4 WTUs release)

2015: Lead Faculty (Biology), CSU Chancellor’s Proven Course Redesign

2015: CSUEB Exceptional Service Award (2 WTUs release)

2014: Helmsley Charitable Trust/CSU STEM Collaboratives Grant (co-PI, $375,000)

2014: CSU Chancellor’s Promising Course Redesign Grant (PI, $41,226)

2014: Alternative Learning Solutions Textbook Program (PI, $1,000)

2014: CSUEB A2E2 Instructional and Research Equipment Grant (PI, $38,376)

2013: CSU Chancellor’s Promising Course Redesign Grant (PI, $50,627)

2013: CSUEB A2E2 Instructional and Research Equipment Grant (PI, $24,777)

2012: Sabbatical, one quarter.

2012: Alternative Learning Solutions Textbook Program (PI, $1,000).

2008: Sabbatical, one quarter (had to turn down)

2007: California State University RSCA Mini Grant (PI, $10,380 + 8 units of release time)

2006: Tenure and Promotion to Associate Professor, CSUEB, Hayward, CA.

2005: California State University RSCA Activity Mini Grant (PI, $5,000)

2003: California State University RSCA Mini Grant (PI, $8,876)

2002: California State University RSCA Mini Grant (PI, 8 units release time)

2001: California State University RSCA Mini Grant (PI, $4,515)

2000: California State University RSCA Mini Grant (PI, $4,055)

© California State University, East Bay. All Rights Reserved.