Faculty Looking for Student-Researchers

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Check out our Past Scholars Page

Linked here is our past scholars page where all previous year's scholars are listed with their project titles and faculty mentors. If any of these projects sound interesting reach out to that faculty mentor using the "CSR Tips on how to find a faculty mentor" to help guide you.

Check out these faculty want ads below

All of the faculty want ads below are posted for faculty actively seeking out students to help on their projects. Don't be afraid to reach out to them, they want to hear from you.

Faculty Looking for Student-Researchers

Want Ads Posted Below

The CSR will list information provided by Cal State East Bay faculty who are interested in working with student-researchers. Students should follow the instructions provided by the faculty member and contact them directly (the CSR does not get involved in this initial contact with the faculty member). Most faculty will ask that you email them with specific information, so please read their project information, closely!

Faculty member: Dr. Abinash Bhattachan

Discipline: Earth and Environmental Sciences

General description of Dr. Bhattachan’s research interests:

I am a broadly trained environmental scientist who works on research topics at the intersection of climate change and human health. I apply a combination of fieldwork and lab experiments along with geospatial analytics to carry out research that is both scientifically relevant and addresses the needs of marginalized communities that are disproportionately affected by impacts of climate change.

Related majors for this project: 

Open to all majors

Project:

The first project looks into microplastics pollution in urban environments. We will focus on the wind transport of microplastics which has recently started to receive some attention in scientific literature and popular media. 

I am looking for a student on a second project which investigates the linkages between drought and infectious disease transmission. This work examines the environmental and climatic determinants of Valley Fever and West Nile virus incidence in California. 

Student researcher expectations and responsibilities:

  • Work 3 - 5 hours per week on your research project
  • Meet every other week with research updates

Dr. Bhattachan’s contact info and instructions regarding what you need to provide when you contact him about a student-research position:

Please email Dr. Bhattachan at abinash.bhattachan@csueastbay.edu with your research interests and availability.

Faculty member: Dr. Mariana Guzzardo 

Discipline:  Human Development and Women’s Studies

Related majors for this project:  Human Development, Sociology, Psychology, Health Sciences, Social Work, Education

Project: Stories of life during a pandemic 

Dr. Guzzardo is a collaborator on an international research study (https://www.storiesduringapandemic.com/) based at  Northeastern University (NU IRB# 20-04-28). The purpose of the study is to understand how people are living with and coping with the current COVID-19 pandemic. Data is collected through a web-based online survey that includes several questions about demographics and 3 open-ended questions.  The project takes a narrative approach, in which respondents discuss their experiences in text form, and the meaning people assign to their experiences is explored in the analysis. 


Student-researcher expectations and responsibilities:

  • Work a minimum of 3-5 hours per week on your research project (CSR Scholar requirement)
  • Code English and/or Spanish responses
  • Collaborate on statistical and qualitative analysis
  • Be conscientious, pay attention to detail, be professional and submit timely and quality work

Contact information:

mariana.guzzardo@csueastbay.edu

Office: MI 4037, Phone- 510-885-4512

In your message, please include: 

  • A statement of interest including relevant experience or knowledge
  • A resume 
  • A written sample such as a student paper or a piece of creative writing
  • Name of two academic references 

Faculty members: Dr. Anndretta Lyle Wilson, Dr. Carlos Salomon, Dr. Nicholas Baham, Dr. Jocyl Sacramento, Dr. Jennifer K. Tran, 

Discipline: Ethnic Studies

General description of Dr. Wilson's expertise:

Wilson is an assistant professor with specialities in Black Studies, Feminisms,  and Community Engagement in the Department of Ethnic Studies. Courses they teach include: Black Power, Enslavement and Resistance, Women of Color Writers, The Black Fantastic: Politics and Popular Culture, and Black Feminism(s). Their most recent publications include "Preserving Sacred Space: Mahalia Jackson’s Transnational Song Labor During the Era of Decolonization" (Springer) and "Between Duty and Romance: The Attraction of Sounding 'Black' in Paris" (University of California)

 

Related majors for this project:  Open to all majors. 

Project: 

Co-Editors: Nicholas Baham, Jocyl Sacramento, Carlos Salomon, Jennifer Tran, Anndretta Lyle Wilson

Love, Knowledge, and Revolution: Decolonizing Directions in Comparative Ethnic Studies is organized to guide instructors and students through an intersectional and comparative approach to understanding key theories, concepts, practices, and movements in Ethnic Studies. Each chapter introduces the decolonial process of Love, Knowledge, and Revolution rooted in the theoretical and activist lineages of Ethnic Studies as an academic discipline. The textbook begins with an introductory chapter explicating the decolonial legacies and origins of Ethnic Studies. The remaining chapters of the textbook are organized in three sections (1) Love; (2) Knowledge; and (3) Revolution as phases in a decolonial process and broach topics ranging from Comparative Ethnic Studies Pedagogy; Music and Performance; Visual Art; Ethnic Futurisms; Settler Colonialism and Indigeneity; U.S. Militarism and Migration; Race, Space; Cities; Class, Labor & Racial Capitalism; Women of Color Feminist Theory and Praxis; Gender and Sexuality; Decolonization; Environmental Activism; Immigration; Abolition and Prison Protest; Social Movements; and Liberation through Education. This textbook offers perspectives to help students develop critical self-awareness that nurtures a love for self and community, explore the theoretical insights of comparative Ethnic Studies, and engage in revolutionary praxis.


Student-researcher expectations and responsibilities: 

  • Work a minimum of 3-5 hours per week on your research project (CSR Scholar requirement)
  • Complete literature reviews using the University library databases 
  • Read and analyze primary and secondary source material 
  • Copy editing, proofreading, indexing, formatting, footnoting, and compiling data for review and publication. 
  • Desirable skills are being able to work independently, ask clarifying questions, knowledge of Chicago style formatting, Microsoft Office, and Google Suite software.  

Next Steps: 

Please complete the interest form uing this link: https://forms.gle/RyWQAcqBmtqjd7Wg9 

You will need to include your name, major, and a brief summary of why you are interested in this project.

Faculty member: Dr. Mariana Guzzardo 

Discipline:  Human Development and Women’s Studies

Related majors for this project:  Human Development, Sociology, Psychology, Health Sciences, Social Work, Education

Project: Access and utilization of health and social services for LatinX immigrants: Perspectives of service providers 

Previous research has concluded that assumptions regarding the use of formal long-term care services do not “fit” with the pattern of use for LatinX elders. In the context of an increased aging LatinX population, it is necessary to connect elderly LatinXs to services they need, as they experience increasing levels of age-related functional limitations. This qualitative descriptive study uses phone interviews to explore service providers’ perceptions of LatinX immigrant elders’ access to, and use of, services in Hayward and the surrounding area. Service providers in this study (n 30) include those geared to working with immigrant families, as well as older adults in general, with the aim of providing community-based long-term care (e.g., nursing, personal care, or social services provided to older persons). A combination of purposive and snowball sampling strategies are  used to recruit participants. Qualitative analysis of the data will identify relevant themes. Data from service providers will provide a nuanced perspective of the complex and interrelated barriers that LatinX immigrant elders face. Increasing our understanding of how LatinX elders utilize LTC services will contribute to proposing more appropriate and effective policies and practices in community service delivery programs. 


Student-researcher expectations and responsibilities:

  • Work a minimum of 3-5 hours per week on your research project (CSR Scholar requirement)
  • Help with participant recruitment; make phone calls to service providers
  • Conduct phone interviews using interview guide
  • Code survey responses
  • Collaborate on qualitative analysis 
  • Be conscientious, pay attention to detail, be professional and submit timely and quality work

Contact information:

mariana.guzzardo@csueastbay.edu

Office: MI 4037, Phone- 510-885-4512

In your message, please include: 

  • A statement of interest including relevant experience or knowledge
  • A resume 
  • A written sample such as a student paper or a piece of creative writing
  • Name of two academic references 

Faculty member: Dr. Anndretta Lyle Wilson

Discipline: Ethnic Studies

General description of Dr. Wilson's expertise:

Wilson is an assistant professor with specialities in Black Studies, Feminisms,  and Community Engagement in the Department of Ethnic Studies. Courses they teach include: Black Power, Enslavement and Resistance, Women of Color Writers, The Black Fantastic: Politics and Popular Culture, and Black Feminism(s). Their most recent publications include "Preserving Sacred Space: Mahalia Jackson’s Transnational Song Labor During the Era of Decolonization" (Springer) and "Between Duty and Romance: The Attraction of Sounding 'Black' in Paris" (University of California)

Related majors for this project:

Open to all majors. 

Project: 

This book project centers Black United States performers who traveled and worked overseas through Jim Crow, Civil Rights, and Black Power eras. 

Student-researcher expectations and responsibilities: 

  • Work a minimum of 3-5 hours per week on your research project (CSR Scholar requirement)
  • Complete literature reviews using the University library databases 
  • Read and analyze primary and secondary source material 
  • Copy editing, proofreading, indexing, formatting, footnoting, and compiling data for review and publication. 
  • Desirable skills are being able to work independently, ask clarifying questions, knowledge of Chicago or MLA style formatting, Microsoft Office, and Google Suite software.  

Next Steps: 

Please contact Dr. Anndretta Wilson <anndretta.wilson@csueastbay.edu> if you are interested in more information or to apply for the position. Please include your name, major, and a brief summary of why you are interested in this project.

Faculty member: Dr. Ram Kandasamy

 

Discipline: Psychology/Neuroscience

 

General description of Dr. Kandasamy’s expertise:
I am a behavioral neuroscientist who is generally interested in the mechanisms underlying
chronic pain. I am interested in discovering new treatments for chronic pain, specifically
treatments that do not produce side effects. These treatments can be combinations of existing
drugs used in humans (e.g., opioids, cannabinoids) or new compounds that have yet to be used
in humans. I use laboratory rats to ensure the drugs produce pain relief without side effects by
measuring pain-related behaviors.

 

Related majors for this project:
Psychology, Biology

 

Project:
Chronic pain affects one third of the U. S. population and costs over $635 billion annually in
medical expenses and lost productivity. Poor analgesic efficacy and undesirable and/or
dangerous side effects greatly limit treatment options. Unfortunately, basic preclinical research
has provided almost no new treatments for chronic pain despite over 50 years of intense
animal research. This project will align preclinical research with clinical goals by shifting the
focus of animal studies from pain inhibition to restoration of normal life activity and elimination
of the negative consequences associated with pain. Specifically, we will determine: 1) whether
home cage wheel running is a reliable and clinically valid method to assess the effect of
inflammatory pain on normal functioning in rats; 2) whether drugs alone impact wheel running
behavior in the absence of pain; and 3) whether drugs can reverse pain-depressed functioning
in rats. The studies will determine what treatments (anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids,
cannabinoids, etc.) alter the development of these behaviors. The studies are important
because they will transform animal research, so it more closely models the human condition.
The benefits will extend from providing a method to assess spontaneous pain in animals to
ushering in a new era of analgesic drug discovery focused reversing the functional
consequences of pain. Given the past failure of drug discovery in pain research, validation of
these behaviors and identifying treatments that prevent the negative consequences of pain will
have a huge impact on improving both animal and human health.

 

Student-researcher expectations and responsibilities:

  • Work a minimum of 3-5 hours per week on your research project
  • Perform research carefully and ethically

 

Dr. Kandasamy’s contact info and instructions regarding what you need to provide when you
contact him about a student-research position:
Please e-mail Dr. Kandasamy at ram.kandasamy@csueastbay.edu stating your interest and
availability.

Faculty member: Dr. Stephen Asztalos

 

Discipline: Physics and Astronomy

 

General description of Dr. Asztalos’s expertise:
My research interests lie in particle astrophysics and stellar evolution, specifically in better
characterizing the properties of Cepheid variables, which are massive, variable stars subject to
periodic oscillations used as standard candles hence, cosmological distance indicators.

 

Related majors for this project:
Physics and astronomy, computer science, geosciences

 

Project:
Cepheid variable stars are massive stars that have ceased burning hydrogen in their cores and
are on the evolutionary track to becoming red supergiants. Along their evolutionary paths they
enter a region of instability (driven by a temperature dependent opacity) that is manifested by
the expansion and contraction of their outer stellar envelopes. The resultant period versus
luminosity relationship transforms these objects into standard candles; the expansion of the
universe was discovered by Edwin Hubble using Cepheid variables as distance indicators. As
central as they are to modern cosmology, some of their properties remain poorly understood.
Specifically, there persists a significant discrepancy between their inferred and modeled masses,
whose resolution may improve their ability to anchor the Hubble diagram. Recent data from the
Las Cumbres Observatory will be used to test the accuracy of 1D stellar modeling codes and
discrepancies used to infer where improvements are needed in the models.

 

Student-researcher expectations and responsibilities:
• Work a minimum of 3-5 hours per week on your research project (CSR Scholar
requirement)
• Work and communicate enthusiastically with a small team that includes undergraduates
from other institutions, as well as more senior scientists
• Learn the basic elements of stellar astrophysics
• Modify, test and run existing stellar evolutionary code(s) and analyze their output

 

Dr. Asztalos contact info. and instructions regarding what you need to provide when you
contact him about a student-research position:
Dr. Asztalos can be reached at stephen.asztalos@csueastbay.edu Please describe any physics
and/or astronomy classes you’ve taken, how much time you can devote per week and with what
languages you have programming experience.

Faculty member: Dr. Jenny Hazlehurst

 

Discipline: Ecology

 

General description of Dr. Hazlehurst's expertise: 

The Pollination Ecology & Conservation Lab @ CSUEB:

You have probably heard that pollinators, those helpful critters that move pollen from one flower to another and give us the abundance of wonderful plants ranging from wildflowers to major crops important to global food security, are in trouble. Pollinators are being threatened by habitat loss, pesticides, and climate change. Research in my lab focuses on how pollinators (from flies to bees to hummingbirds) change how and what plants they eat in response to these changes, and what cascading effects those changes might have on the plants that depend on animals for pollination. My lab is also interested in using citizen science platforms like iNaturalist to both aid in scientific data collection and to improve scientific literacy outside of the scientific community.

 

Related majors for this project: 

Biology, Earth & Environmental Science, Computer Science, Education, Communication, English, Art. 

 

Project: 

There are several projects available for students to work on as my new lab starts gearing up its research. 

   1. Using the iNaturalist app to document plant-pollinator networks in California 

The lab needs a tech savvy individual with a love for nature to help manage and promote our iNaturalist project, The California Pollination Project (website: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/california-pollination-project). Part of this project will involve learning to do network analysis in the program R.

    2. Native bee diversity on CSUEB’s campus

Did you know there are over 4,000 species of bees native to North America, and most are very different from the popular honey bee? Help the lab start to document native bee diversity on campus! 

   3. Pollination ecology of the Snowplant (Sarcodes sanguinea) in the Sierra Nevada

Snowplant is a fascinating parasitic plant that features a large, bright red inflorescence of flowers that sticks straight up out of the ground in the Sierra Nevada mountains after the first snows begin to melt. It also happens to be a preferred food for at least one species of migratory hummingbird species, the Calliope hummingbird (Selasphorus calliope).

   4. Others… 

Do you have an idea for a research project involving pollinators, native California plants, or science communication? I am very open to exploring opportunities for artists, writers, and educators as well as scientists. Let Dr. Hazlehurst know!

 

Student-researcher expectations and responsibilities:

  • Work a minimum of 3-5 hours per week on your research project (CSR Scholar requirement).
  • Stay in regular communication with Dr. Hazlehurst about your research progress.
  • Attend and participate in regular lab meetings (twice a month).
  • Share in regular lab duties with other lab members (for example, maintaining and cleaning equipment that you are using). 
  • Complete all required lab and fieldwork training while in the lab.
  • Be a partner in creating a creative, collaborative, and productive atmosphere in the lab.

 

Dr. Hazlehurt's contact info. and instructions regarding what you need to provide when you contact her about a student-research position: 

Interested in doing research with us?

Directions: Reach out to Dr. Hazlehurst by email (see below). In the subject of the email, please mention CSR if you already are or are interested in applying to be a CSR Scholar. In the email itself, please provide a statement about your research interests and goals and how they intersect with the work my lab is doing on pollinators. In the email, please also include contact information for one faculty reference who is willing to give you a good recommendation (be sure to ask their permission first), and a copy of your Resume. Here is a summary of what you will need:

  • Contact information for 1 faculty reference (can be from another school, get their permission first).
  • A statement about your research interests and goals, and how they intersect with my lab’s research on pollinators.
  • A copy of your current resume.

Contact Info

Email: jenny.hazlehurst@csueastbay.edu

Website: https://www.hazlehurstecolab.com/

Faculty member: Dr. Heather Vilhauer

 

Discipline: Hospitality, Recreation and Tourism

 

General description of Dr. Vilhauer’s expertise:

Heather Vilhauer is an Assistant Professor in the Hospitality, Recreation and Tourism Department. She teaches classes on youth development, leadership and management, and data-driven decision making. Her research interests include leadership and career development in parks and recreation, as well as disaster planning and relief in the public parks and recreation sector.

Prior to her work in education, she spent over 20 years working in nonprofit, public, and for-profit recreation in a variety of jobs including camp director and Director of Volunteer Resources for Girl Scouts of Northern California. She has degrees in recreation and business and a doctorate in Organization and Leadership from the University of San Francisco.

 

Related majors for this project:

Open to all

 

Project: 

This project is making use of the results of a survey of parks and recreation professionals in California. The survey focused on transformational leadership, leadership development, and career pathing and experiences in parks and recreation. Research assistants will work with the researcher to determine the exact focus of this study (and resulting publication).

 

Student-researcher expectations and responsibilities: 

  • Work a minimum of 3-5 hours per week on your research project (CSR Scholar requirement)
  • Conduct literature reviews using the University library databases (focused on transformational leadership, career pathing, and leadership development)
  • Code qualitative data from survey
  • Analyze qualitative data from survey
  • Manuscript writing

 

Next Steps: 

Please contact Dr. Heather Vilhauer @ heather.vilhauer@csueastbay.edu if you are interested in more information or to apply for the position. Please include your name, major, and a brief summary of why you are interested in this project.

 

Faculty member: Dr. Albert R. Mendoza

 Discipline: Kinesiology (Physical Activity and Health)

 Looking for students from the following disciplines: Applied and basic sciences, and others (if applicable).

General description of Dr. Mendoza’s expertise:

Dr. Mendoza received his BS in Kinesiology (Exercise and Movement Sciences) and MS in Kinesiology (Exercise Physiology) from San Francisco State University and his Ph.D. in Kinesiology from the Physical Activity and Health Laboratory at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

 Dr. Mendoza's research focus is to develop and validate innovative methods to process and interpret physical activity and sedentary behavior data collected from wearable sensors (e.g., Fitbit or other wearable device data). This work will enhance our understanding of the relationship between physical activity, sedentary behavior and health.

Project:

The proposed project is a prospective cohort study of objectively measured, physical activity and sedentary behavior levels in college students with 1- and 2-year follow-ups.  We will also employ several validated questionnaires to explore relationships among outcome measures.  For example, a U.S. Household Food Security questionnaire will be used to identify those students/households that are food insecure. These data will allow us to identify: (1) whether students are meeting U.S. physical activity recommendations, (2) the amount of time students engage in sedentary behaviors (3) racial/ethnic disparities, (4) those at risk for negative health outcomes, and (5) possible intervention strategies to minimize risk for negative health outcomes.

Student-researcher expectations and responsibilities:

  • Work a minimum of 3-5 hours per week on your research project (CSR Scholar requirement),
  • Recruitment and consenting study participants,
  • Initializing, employing and downloading research- and consumer-grade activity monitors,
  • Administering questionnaires,
  • Analyzing and interpreting research- and consumer-grade activity monitor data, and,
  • Organizing, storing and maintaining activity monitors.

Dr. Mendoza’s contact information and instructions regarding what you need to provide when you contact him about a student-research position:

Contact Dr. Mendoza and inform him why you are interested in joining his research team, and why you may be a good fit.

Email:  albert.mendoza@csueastbay.edu

Faculty member: Dr. Nidhi Khosla, PhD, MPH, PGDRM (MBA)

 Discipline: Public Health

 General description of Dr. Khosla’s expertise:

Khosla’s research concerns access to care among vulnerable populations and reducing health disparities. Her current research focuses on increasing access to and satisfaction with palliative and end-of-life care among minorities, especially persons of South Asian origin. She has also researched organizational behavior such as collaboration among HIV agencies.

E esearch link (Google Scholar): Google Scholar Nidhi Khosla

MEDIA COVERAGE OF HER RESEARCH (select examples): 

  • http://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-07-south-asians-reluctant-medication-pain.html
  • http://www.business-standard.com/article/news-ians/south-asians-in-us-reluctant-to-report-pain-115072400530_1.html
  • http://www.indiawest.com/news/global_indian/study-points-to-need-to-share-end-of-life-wish/article_5bfb621e-0f91-11e5-bfbb-572da2f314e9.html
  • http://www.futurity.org/food-banks-public-assistance-953902/
  • http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/04/150416132337.htm 
  • http://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-06-clients-lost-safety-net-agencies.html 

 Related majors for this project: Health Sciences, Social Work, Education, Human Development preferred

 Project:

 Project 1 is focused on factors that affect healthcare-related decision making among South Asians. One dataset comprises 10 focus group discussions with youth of South Asian origin. Data was collected from Cal State East Bay students in 2018 and is being analysed. Another dataset includes focus group discussions and interviews with healthcare providers with experience caring for seriously ill South Asians. Students will learn how to do a literature review and how to prepare a manuscript for submission to a peer reviewed journal.

 Project 2 seeks to investigate issues around how to make advance care planning more popular among minorities and the knowledge-attitude-behaviors of young people towards advance care planning. Minorities are known to have low rates of advance directive completion. Advance care planning refers to behaviors such as completing a written advance directive (e.g., living will), appoint a durable power of attorney or having conversations with loved ones about the type of care one would desire if in the future one is not able to communicate one’s decisions/preferences. This project will involve literature review, and may involve data collection and analysis.

 Project 3 requires updating a literature review on collaboration among HIV agencies in the US, reviewing coding and possibly conducting a few interviews with HIV agencies’ representatives. This requires a Master’s level student.

 Student-researcher expectations and responsibilities:

  • Work a minimum of 3-5 hours per week on your research project (CSR Scholar requirement)
  • Meet with the professor and other student assistants on the team as required by the professor
  • Be conscientious, pay attention to details, be professional and submit timely and quality work
  • Maintain personal integrity and data integrity and not share project data or findings outside the study team
  • Be willing to take on research responsibilities as they emerge

Dr. Khosla’s contact info. and instructions regarding what you need to provide when you contact her about a student-research position:

Nidhi.khosla@csueastbay.edu

Office: SF 543, Phone- 510-885-2718

 A resume

A written sample such as a student paper or a piece of creative writing

Name of two referees at CSUEB-staff/professors who can discuss your abilities