Meet Our Faculty and Staff

Faculty and Staff

Dr. Rush Woods

Dr. Rush Woods

Lead Faculty

Dr. Rush Woods has the distinction of being appointed as the first Diversity Officer for California State University, East Bay, as of July 1, 2013.  In her role as Diversity Officer, Dr. Woods coordinates efforts to foster and support diversity, equity and inclusion as core values throughout all aspects of the University community.  Her work emphasizes diversity-oriented programs and initiatives including implementation of the University Diversity Plan to ensure that actions are taken to fulfill its commitments.  She previously served as the Chief of Staff to Dr. Leroy Morishita, President of Cal State East Bay. Joining the faculty initially as a lecturer in the Department of Sociology, Dr. Woods was appointed as a tenure track faculty member in 2001.  A founding member of the Department of Social Work, Dr. Woods served as its chair from 2007-2010.  As a professor and active scholar in Social Work, Dr. Woods is recognized regionally and nationally for her work in the areas of race, gender and equity issues in the academy; photo-voice, community empowerment; and the overlap between domestic violence and animal abuse.  In addition, Dr. Woods has served as the principal or co-principal investigator on a series of Title IV Education Department grants and California Social Work Educational Consortium II Mental Health Department grants.

 

Dr. Anndretta Wilson

Dr. Anndretta Wilson

Dr. Anndretta Wilson's  current manuscript, “Labor, Pleasure, and Possession through Transnational Black Musical Performance” traces US Black American subterranean performances from community spaces where practitioners embodied African retentions to public commercial spaces where derivative performances have been feminized, racialized, and backgrounded in service to popular music globally. The study considers precarity, authorship, mastery, and mobility for Black performers through spaces within the US and circulating transnationally across technologies and geographies. A primary figure is former domestic worker Marion Williams whose forty-year career began in Pentecostal churches in the 1930s and extended to service as a US State Department musical ambassador across Africa and Europe. The study concludes with ethnography of contemporary francophone African performers in Paris who perform gospel concerts advertised as “Black American” for international tourists in Catholic cathedrals.
Dr. Dennis Chester, Ph.D

Dr. Dennis Chester

Dr. Dennis Chester has been a faculty member at CSUEB since 1999 where his academic focus has been on African American Literature. He has published articles and presented papers on African American detective fiction, writers of the Harlem Renaissance, and African American cinema. Dr. Chester is currently collaborating with other CSUEB faculty on a digital annotation of James Baldwin’s 1961 novel, Another Country.

Nicholas L Baham, III, Ph.D

Dr. Nicholas L Baham, III

Dr. Nicholas L. Baham III is a Professor of Ethnic Studies at California State University East Bay and teaches courses in African American Studies and Genders & Sexualities in Communities of Color.  Dr. Baham is a San Francisco native. He attended college at the University of Chicago, earned his Master’s degree at Stanford University and received his Ph.D. in Anthropology at Indiana University, Bloomington. His academic research focuses on African American religious experience, sexuality, and artistic expression. His book, The Coltrane Church: Apostles of Sound, Agents of Social Justice will be published in 2015 by McFarland Press. He has a growing body of published journal articles on the Coltrane Church, African American musical and religious expression, and James Baldwin including “I Know You Know: Esperanza Spalding’s Hybrid, Intertextual, Multilingual, Relevant Jazz Aesthetic,”  “Radio Free Coltrane: Free Jazz Radio as Revolutionary Practice” in Americana: The Journal of American Popular Culture, and “Rough Sex and Racial Reconciliation in James Baldwin’s Another Country” to be published as a chapter in an upcoming edition of new writing on the legacy of James Baldwin. He has presented his work nationally and internationally at the Universite Paul-Valery in Montpellier, France, Stanford University, University of Pennsylvania, Tuskegee, and Suffolk University. Dr. Baham has appeared on BET, local KPOO and KPFA radio, Canada’s SexTV and in ColorLines and Esquire magazine. He has initiated a blog of African American politics and culture called The Upper Room at nicholasbaham.blogspot.com. At California State University East Bay, Dr. Baham teaches courses on African American intellectual history, religion, jazz music, hip-hop, sexuality,James Baldwin, Malcolm X, race and masculinity, and a yearlong freshman cluster on the history of European colonialism.

Dr. Sukari Ivester

Dr. Sukari Ivester

Dr. Sukari Ivester, PhD is an urban sociologist and social epidemiologist with broad interests in urban development, the social determinants of health, the politics of resistance, and urban history. With a specialization as a Brazilianist, she is currently exploring the social impacts of the World Cup 2014/ Olympics 2016. Her most recent publication explores FIFA and its policies of exclusion through the case of the Baianas do Acarajé at the World Cup 2014 in Salvador.  In addition, Dr. Ivester is working on a US/Brazil comparative social historical project on urban slavery.
Dr. Ivester earned her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Chicago and a B.A. in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. Following the completion of her PhD, Dr. Ivester was a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley.
Dr. Ivester teaches Medical Sociology, Urban Sociology, Sociology of Travel and Tourism, Olympics and Urban Development, Research Methods, and Social History of Brazil. She is active in the American Sociological Association, Urban Affairs Association, Latin American Studies Association, and American Historical Association.

Dr. ZaNean McClain, PhD

Dr. ZaNean McClain

Dr. ZáNean McClain’s research interest focuses on instructional effectiveness, enjoyment in school physical education, adapted physical activity/motor difficulties, evidence-based research and practices, service learning, community engagement and social justice practices, inclusive interdisciplinary curriculum, mentoring and diversity issues and strategies within all levels of education, skateboarding and its culture of youth, parents and stakeholders, and physical activity promotion for all populations. She has continued to work on systematic observational techniques, which helps with awareness and in turn improvement of effective strategies within settings such as sport, exercise and physical activity. She has worked on the Commission on Teachers Credentialing (CTC) approval document in order for the Physical Education Teaching program to be recognized as a program that truly prepares quality and effective teachers to go into any credential program and eventually into the field of teaching.

Dr. McClain’s vision is to conduct research while enhancing opportunities to engage students in scholarship and practical experiences through funding for undergraduate students in public and private sectors, coordinate and supervise students within a variety of settings. Furthermore, Dr. McClain wants to secure funding for undergraduate and graduate students during summer programs and/or year-long institutes, and provide students with the opportunity to lead in an academic and physical activity program aimed at servicing underprivileged children and youth in the community, while conducting immediate and longitudinal research on various aspects of the program.

Bobby Ewing

Bobby Ewing

Sankofa Scholars Academic and Enrichment Counselor

Bobby Ewing

Bobby Ewing is the Sankofa Scholars Academic and Enrichment Counselor in Student Equity and Success.  His role is focused on supporting African American students as they transition to and navigate though CSUEB.  Bobby received both his Bachelor's degree in Sociology and Master's degree in Higher Education and Student Affairs from the University of San Francisco.  His master's program was focused on improving access to higher education for first generation, low-income, and underserved students.  Prior to East Bay, he worked at the University of California, Berkeley with undergraduate and graduate students.  Additionally, Bobby worked at the University of California, Santa Cruz where he served as an Academic Counselor and Pre-Graduate Programs Coordinator for the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP).