LBST Courses

Oakland mural

LBST 201: Introduction to Liberal Studies

Units: 3
Introduction to the liberal arts educational approach, and application of interdisciplinary perspective to selected contemporary issues. Emphasis on information, reasoning, and evidence in written and/or visual presentations. 

Credit Restrictions: Not open to students with credit in HUM 2010.
Equivalent Quarter Course: HUM 2010.
Possible Instructional Methods: Entirely Online, On Ground or Hybrid.
Grading: A-F grading only.
Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

Fall 2022

LBST 201 - Intro to Liberal Studies (3 Units)

01   2176  1   LEC  50/32  W          Hayward Campus     MI-2106    07:00P-09:00P Ellis-Marino E. 1,R
                           ** Meets 08-17-2022 to 08-17-2022 **
                           W          Hayward Campus     MI-2106    07:00P-09:00P Ellis-Marino E. 
                           ** Meets 09-21-2022 to 09-21-2022 **
                           W          Hayward Campus     MI-2106    07:00P-09:00P Ellis-Marino E. 
                           ** Meets 11-02-2022 to 11-02-2022 **
                           TBA        Hayward Campus     WEB-ASYNCH               Ellis-Marino E. 

02   2177  1   LEC  50/45  Th         Concord Campus     CCLB-250   07:00P-09:00P Ellis-Marino E. 1,R
                           ** Meets 08-18-2022 to 08-18-2022 **
                           Th         Concord Campus     CCLB-250   07:00P-09:00P Ellis-Marino E. 
                           ** Meets 09-22-2022 to 09-22-2022 **
                           Th         Concord Campus     CCLB-250   07:00P-09:00P Ellis-Marino E. 
                           ** Meets 11-03-2022 to 11-03-2022 **
                           TBA        Concord Campus     WEB-ASYNCH               Ellis-Marino E.


Student Learning Outcomes - Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  1. show preliminary appreciation of the concept and importance of a well-rounded liberal arts education;
  2. show emerging foundational knowledge and understanding of interdisciplinary perspectives (humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences) on one or two contemporary issues of global scale;
  3. present the issue in question from interdisciplinary perspectives with reasonable articulation of the issue, past attempts to address the issue, and remaining problems, with reasonable evidence and valid reasoning;
  4. present the above in both speech and writing, supplemented by relevant visual and quantitative information; and
  5. engage in team work on a course project within a small group
books

LBST 499: Liberal Studies Senior Seminar

Units: 3
Capstone course for the Liberal Studies majors.  Emphasis on interdisciplinary analysis of a significant contemporary issue.  Written and/or web-based presentation of research and/or community engagement activities, and student learning outcomes portfolio.

Prerequisites: LBST 201.
Credit Restrictions: Not open to students with credit in HUM 4020.
Equivalent Quarter Course: HUM 4020.
Possible Instructional Methods: Entirely Online, On Ground or Hybrid.
Grading: A-F grading only.
Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

Fall 2022
LBST 499 - Liberal Studies Senior Seminar (3 Units)
01   2178  1   LEC  40/3   TBA        Online Campus      WEB-ASYNCH           Ellis-Marino E. 2

Student Learning Outcomes - Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  1. show solid foundational knowledge and understanding of interdisciplinary perspectives (humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences) on one contemporary issue of global scale;
  2. present the issue in question from interdisciplinary perspectives with clear articulation of the issue, past attempts to address the issue, and remaining problems, with solid evidence and clear reasoning;
  3. perceive and express personal and societal values and ethical orientations regarding the issue, present the above clearly in both speech and writing, supplemented with relevant visual and quantitative information;
  4. engage in team work on a course project within a small group, showing ability to listen and adopt comments and suggestions from others; and
  5. develop a personal portfolio showing accomplishments of the Liberal Studies Program SLOs.
Artwork by Alicia Siu, 2015

LBST 223: Education for Liberation

Units: 3

This lower division, interdisciplinary course focuses on how teachers and students can help create a more fair and just society. The class focuses on institutional challenges, educational policies, social problems and solutions in and through K-12 education as it relates to the intersections of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and ability.  The class provides students an opportunity to learn critical theories and practices that lead to liberatory forms of education. Crosslisted as ES 223. This course meets the CSU Ethnic Studies (Area F) requirement.

Prerequisites: none.
Credit Restrictions:
none.

Possible Instructional Methods:
Entirely Online, On Ground or Hybrid.
Grading:
A-F grading only.
Course Typically Offered:
Fall 

 

Student Learning Outcomes - Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  1. analyze educational policies and practices;
  2. articulate theories of social change in education;
  3. apply praxis models to address educational issues; and
  4. discuss the intersection of ethnic studies and education.

Area F Learning Outcomes

  1. Using a comparative or focused approach, explain and analyze core concepts such as racialization, racism, white supremacy, racial capitalism, critical race theory, intersectionality, women of color feminisms, queer of color theory, (counter)hegemony, eurocentrism, self-determination, food justice in communities of color, environmental justice, liberation, decolonization, genocide, sovereignty, indigeneity, imperialism, settler colonialism, antiBlackness, or anti-racism as analyzed in Native American/American Indian/Indigenous Studies, Chicana/o/x or Latina/o/x Studies, African American/Black/Africana/African Descended/Descendent of Enslaved African Studies, Asian/Pacific Islander/Middle Eastern/South Asian (APIMESA) American Studies.
  2. Critically analyze the Black feminist concept of intersectionality and the intersection of race, class, and gender with other axes of oppression including sexuality, sexual violence, religion/spirituality, national origin, immigration and citizenship status, ability, Indigenous sovereignty, language, and/or age as they apply to African American/Black/African diasporic/African Descended/Descendant of Enslaved African, Chicana/o/x or Latina/o/x, Asian/Pacific Islander/Middle Eastern/South Asian (APIMESA) American, and/or Native American/American Indian/Indigenous communities.
  3. Critically review how struggle, resistance, rematriation, social justice activism, solidarity, abolition, and liberation, as experienced, enacted, and studied by American Indians/Native Americans/Indigenous people, African Americans/Black people/African diasporic/African Descended/Descendant of Enslaved Africans, Asian/Pacific Islanders/Middle Eastern/South Asian (APIMESA) Americans and/or Latinas/os/xs or Chicanos/as/xs are relevant to current and structural issues such as communal, national, international, and transnational politics as for example, in health disparities, educational inequities, immigration policies, reparations, settler-colonialism, language policies, media depictions of ethnic/racial groups, racial and sexual violence, prison industrial complex, community development, gentrification, and/or other ethnic politics.